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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have these two Civil War era BP firearms. I would really appreciate it if the board experts took a gander and told me what they think. Any iffy looking bits? The rifle musket has been cleaned but other than that do they look original?

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1. 1860 Army Revolver
http://s276.photobucket.com/albums/kk9/shutupnshoot/Firearms/1860Army/

2. 1861 Springfield Rifle Musket
http://s276.photobucket.com/albums/kk9/shutupnshoot/Firearms/1861RifleMusket/

Cheers and thanks ...:)
 

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Both are originals near as I can tell...the only thing that jumps out is the front triggerguard screw on the Colt. It appears to be a replacement.
 

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Both nice looking guns, I would like to see more of the 1860 Army, #'s I can see match, wear looks average. I am researching one like it now, along with an 1851 Navy.
 

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To illustrate What I mean about the screw...here are a couple of shots of mine. You can see that the front triggerguard screw should be flush with the surface, with a head the same size as the two in back. Shouldn't be too big of a deal to find a replacement.

I don't have my letter from Colt yet, but from the looks of things, your revolver was likely shipped to the US Army in either May or June of 1863.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks all for your responses. Yes jrhead75, the screw looks like a careless replacement. As you said, it shouldn't be hard to find a good one.
Rick N, let me know if you'd find any more specific pics useful.
Just want to put together a reliable description and I am no expert. I actually have a "professional" appraisal for the Springfield Rifle Musket from a local store that specializes in C&R and antiques.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Okay I have added a few more photographs for each gun. The newer photographs are on the top now. Here are a few more questions/comments ...

1860 Army
Are those case hardening colors on the hammer?
What is the "E" stamp on the barrel? The one on the trigger guard is also "E".
Apart from the first few serial numbers that were shipped to the South were any specific later serial numbers shipped to the South? Why would a manufacturer be allowed to ship to the enemy?

1861 Springfield
There are a few faintly visible stamps on the wood on the grip that look like "J66". What are these? Any detailed information about the other stamps?
BTW Rick the barrel length is 40 inches.
 

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Those "E" stamps should be assembly numbers and probably can be found on other bits - they were used to match fitted parts back up.
 

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It is a very legitimate musket with all the correct parts. I could not see a cartouche, so it's hard to tell if it has been sanded and refinished. The only fault I could find is the sear screw is not correct or is backed out. The end of the screw should project slightly from the lockplate. If the bore is nice and shootable, I would think it is in the $2,000+ category.
 

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You know, I would love to have a look at you guns but I have been getting "Login to Photobucket" and of course it won't accept the password to my account. Any idea what I am doing wrong?
 

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Thanks Jimbo.

Shutupandshoot, the M1861 Rifle Musket is a very nice, clean gun in totally original condition. It appears to have been well used but not fooled with after it's military service. I like the fact that it has it's original ramrod too, many don't.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
@TP yes as Jimbo453 said please use the guest password "gunboards09".(edit: cross-posted with TP)
@musketshooter did you mean the hammer screw? The sear screw won't be visible from the outside, right? The hammer screw was a little loose but does not sit flush even when tightened. None of the examples I have seen online are flush though. Can you can link me to a correct pic? As far as the bore goes I will post later since I don't have a pen flashlight right now. Doesn't look rusty. The mechanicals are excellent with a crisp half cock and full cock.
(edit: on re-reading your comments about the screw I see what you are saying)
More questions ...
Does the "E 29" on the butt plate of the rifle musket denote the company and soldier? Has anyone tried to track down the soldier based on this?
 

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More questions ...
Does the "E 29" on the butt plate of the rifle musket denote the company and soldier? Has anyone tried to track down the soldier based on this?
Yes, "E" may be the Company letter and "29" could be the soldier's number within that company but without the Regimental number you would never be able to make even a WAG as to who the rifle was issued to. As a matter of fact, even if the regiment were known, few if any records exist from that period that could help you with that search, the vast majority of regiments at that period (CW era) were State regiments in Federal service and neither the states or the national government kept detailed records. Some are in state archives but not many. And as one man was replaced, his number was taken by another - man number 29 of Co. E in January of 1863 was someone else in July of '63 and someone else yet in January of '64. And so it goes, the number meant something to t6he company clerk and the captain but didn't mean much to anyone outside that unit so the records were often disposed of when that unit was dissolved at the end of it's active service.

It is not terribly unusual to see a sear or sear spring screw that appears to be a little short, it may be a replacement screw put in for repair or to replace a lost screw, very likely during the period of the rifle musket's use. It doesn't hurt the value of the gun in the slightest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I was Googling around a little yesterday before TP's response and I reached the conclusion that the search cannot be narrowed down to fewer than about a 100 soldiers using this information. Another approach is if there are records from the armory showing where the guns were shipped. The Springfield Armory contracted out the manufacture to twenty other firms so this might be difficult.
On the positive side, even if more than one man was assigned E29 that doesn't really confound our search. Each must then be considered a bearer of this weapon.
BTW I think I have in storage a bayonet that looks a heck of a lot like the ones I have seen in photos of the 1861. Will post soon.
 
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