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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm doing a gun transfer for a friend over at my house for an acquaintance who knows I like old WWII guns. He brings over this old gal and at first, I thought it was just a 91/30 until I got a better look at her. It's a 1930 Tula on barrel shank and the tang reads 1930 Tula as well. Typical Finn shims and barrel channel sanding also. There are no import markings on the rifle. He received it about 15 years ago from his father-in-law who apparently purchased it in the 1960's. What I found "odd" is the presence of old "type 2" sights in 1930 and the Russian hammer/sickle being still present. There is also a larger boxed SA above the regular SA on the left side of the barrel shank. The bolt has two numbers one of which matches the number on the barrel shank. Any thoughts as to what this rifle might have originally been? Is she just a plain old first year 91/30 Finn capture? He wants to sell also but I don't know what to offer him.





 

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That looks to be a Finn captured 1930 Izhevsk “Dragoon” rifle. The rear sight would be correct for this variation. The bolt may be (and likely was) renumbered by the Finns, and the other number present on the top of the bolt body there should be an old civil guard number from the rifle it was previously a part of prior to being swapped in on this one and renumbered.
 

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It's a Dragoon rifle--they were produced a few years after 1930. I cannot remember the last year of production on them. I don't know why a Tula receiver was used. Nor do I know a good offer. I'd say $450; however, prices are insane right now. So, I don't know what a good offer would be.
 

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With the missing cleaning rod I would say that $450-500 would be a reasonable place to start as far as making an offer on it, but in present crazy times would expect to pay up to $650 or so if everything else is in order and bore condition is fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It's a Dragoon rifle--they were produced a few years after 1930. I cannot remember the last year of production on them. I don't know why a Tula receiver was used. Nor do I know a good offer. I'd say $450; however, prices are insane right now. So, I don't know what a good offer would be.
Very cool to hear. I was thinking "ex-dragoon" because I thought Dragoon production ended in the 20's but what do I know. I'm so sorry........I got my markings confused, it's an Izhevsk.....not a Tula. Was Tula not making receivers in 1930?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
With the missing cleaning rod I would say that $450-500 would be a reasonable place to start as far as making an offer on it, but in present crazy times would expect to pay up to $650 or so if everything else is in order and bore condition is fine.
Is there a specific style cleaning rod for that year? Are they hard to find?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Regular 91/30 cleaning rod should be fine and they’re not too hard to find, just an added cost so could be a point to haggle a bit on.
Thanks. He also brought over a German Commission 88 that has been "turked" and she is a cosmoline monster. I'm going to see if he wants to bundle the two. Oddly enough, I transferred him a brand-new Tikka rifle today.
 

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Very cool to hear. I was thinking "ex-dragoon" because I thought Dragoon production ended in the 20's but what do I know. I'm so sorry........I got my markings confused, it's an Izhevsk.....not a Tula. Was Tula not making receivers in 1930?
Tula made receivers in 1930. You said it had a Tula marking on the tang. It's not horribly uncommon to see a rifle with a barrel from one factory, and a receiver from a different factory. I don't think it would be common to see that on a 1930 production rifle. Finland sometimes swapped barrels/receivers; however, these were generally (in my experience) older rifles from WW1.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Tula made receivers in 1930. You said it had a Tula marking on the tang. It's not horribly uncommon to see a rifle with a barrel from one factory, and a receiver from a different factory. I don't think it would be common to see that on a 1930 production rifle. Finland sometimes swapped barrels/receivers; however, these were generally (in my experience) older rifles from WW1.
The bore/rifling are really decent with no pitting. Muzzle has been counterbored, but the new crown is just fine. Original finish on the wood? I can't find any markings on the wood for what it's worth. Thanks for your input BTW. I wonder if the Civil Guard number on the bolt could put it with a known unit?
 

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It's a depot-built rifle. It was assembled by repair depot using spare action (receiver with attached barrel and sights). The rifle was numbered by repair depot, just compare serial number style with other Izhevsk 1930 rifles, it is different. And also your rifle is missing O and K in a circle proof marks on the right side of the barrel shank
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
It's a depot-built rifle. It was assembled by repair depot using spare action (receiver with attached barrel and sights). The rifle was numbered by repair depot, just compare serial number style with other Izhevsk 1930 rifles, it is different. And also your rifle is missing O and K in a circle proof marks on the right side of the barrel shank
What is the significance of the "O" and "K" not being stamped on the barrel shank? Any thoughts as to why the Finns would leave the Soviet markings on the shank if this was a "depot-built rifle"?
 
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