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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a Wilkinson-made Pattern 1895 sword, with the patented solid hilt. It was originally made for Lieutenant (later Colonel) Lewis Munro of the Hampshire Regiment, who served in the Second Boer War.
It's in fair condition, but has a small bend in the last 5cm of the tip.
I'd like to straighten it to its original position, but the last thing I want to do is break off the tip. Are there any "tips" on a safe way to go about this?
Cheers from Oz

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Tip 1. Don't do it.

Tip 2. If you have to don't put it in a vice and try to bend it back. Get a big block of steel and grind a shallow groove in it 1/8 to 1/4 inch deep and 1-2 inches wide. Place the bend over the center of the groove with at least 3/4 inch of the tip fully supported by the flat portion. Then start tapping the bend down with a hammer. Cover where you hit with a few layers of duct tape and start slow. But you will probably have to end up hitting it pretty hard.

Tip 3. Dont try to make it perfect just less obvious.

Tip 4. If it breaks don't blame me.

Tip 5. Don't do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah, that's what I figured. I've seen plenty of swords with old repairs to broken-off tips.
Perhaps the bend occurred during a fierce hand-to-hand battle during the Siege of Mafeking or the Battle of Colenso?
More likely he accidentally closed the lid of his trunk on it.
 

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Tip 1 and Tip 5 are the right tips.
 
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I have used a vice several times for bent sword tips, and bayonet blades. With good results.

This method doesnt work for everybody, but just stating my experience having done it.

Keep in mind many sword blades were made of spring steel, that was designed to flex to some degree. In fact many swords underwent a bending test during inspection.
 

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Have 1915 Lithgow ex hooky same bloody problem 🤢 as of yet left well enough alone.🤷‍♂️

I have a Normandy Invasion documentary from 1994 on VHS that shows British troops in England training. At one point they show closeups of several doing upward thrusts at a bayonet dummy. The one Tommy stabbed a lot harder than the others as the 1907 blade really flexed in that scene. Not sure if doing such training exercises could in fact bend a 1907 blade ??
 

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I have a Normandy Invasion documentary from 1994 on VHS that shows British troops in England training. At one point they show closeups of several doing upward thrusts at a bayonet dummy. The one Tommy stabbed a lot harder than the others as the 1907 blade really flexed in that scene. Not sure if doing such training exercises could in fact bend a 1907 blade ??
Thanks for that tidbit,have also read & seen photo’s of them using the 1907 pat bayonet’s to pry open heavy wooden crates etc like a (Sears crow bar 🤢🤣),guess it’s all part of the history of the pointy bits.🤔🤷‍♂️
Cheer’s
 

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Along the way I have seen photos of Tommy Adkins or Digger Smith etc using P1907 bayonets in unapproved fashion. Including cooking tasks and poking fire coals.
I'm guessing a personal sword of an officer wouldn't be relegated to such tasks.
Opening wine bottles and tins of caviar....maybe.:p
 
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