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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Posting this question here since I figure someone will know. I have an Australian P37 web belt that is light green in color (or should that be colour?), and it has an extra tab on each side with a small D ring hanging down. Were belts like this post-WWII use only?

It seems like I read that somewhere, but I haven't been able to find any confirmation of the fact. I'm beginning to wonder if the changes to the P37 gear that the Aussies made in 1944 (like the wider shoulder straps) would also include the tabs on the belt.

I have a 1944 S&W Victory revolver with Aussie markings and a 1944-dated Aussie P37 holster and ammo pouch. I want to know if the belt is "right" to complete the set!

Thanks to anyone who knows!
 

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Don't tell anyone but the Ozmanics hung their vegemite pouches from the D-rings :rolleyes:

From Ed the manual man.

Australian Web Gear Pattern 1937
http://home.comcast.net/~ehorton/Pattern 37 Australian Web Gear.pdf

Canadian Web Gear Pattern 1937
http://home.comcast.net/~ehorton/Canadian Web Gear.pdf

Canadian Web Gear Pattern 1937 Ancillaries
http://home.comcast.net/~ehorton/37 Web, Canadian Ancillaries.pdf

The Development of Mills Woven Cartridge Belt 1877-1956
http://home.comcast.net/~ehorton/Development of Mills.pdf

Mills Woven Military Equipment
http://home.comcast.net/~ehorton/Mills Woven Military Equipment.pdf
 

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It doesn't sound like an Australian issue at all - it sounds more like a British '44 issue belt

the Australian army issued '37 issue up until they issued american webbing in the early 60's - vietnam era

the Australian '37 web belts were khaki not green
 

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It doesn't sound like an Australian issue at all - it sounds more like a British '44 issue belt

the Australian army issued '37 issue up until they issued american webbing in the early 60's - vietnam era

the Australian '37 web belts were khaki not green
Im most of the pictures I have seen Australian troops in Vietnam appear to have been issued with 44 Patt webbing; albeit somtimes with American water bottles.
 

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Pattern 47

HI found this information.

Cotton; Anodised alloy; Brass; Pattern 1944 green three part waist belt, made of two side pieces and an central adjustment strap, with a hook and loop front buckle for closure. Size adjustment is by double hooks at the end of each side piece, which fit into fabric loops in the adjustment strap. The belt was available in two sizes. The size of this belt is 'Normal', having a maximum adjustment of 40 inches. Each side piece has a diagonally fitted link for the attachment of shoulder strap braces, while the adjustment strap has a pair of diagonally fitted green anodised alloy one inch buckles for fitting of the inner straps of the braces. A series of brass eyelets is let into the lower edge of the belt for attachment of water bottle and machete. A square mark is visible where a one inch strap with a snap fastener, which was was intended to secure a rifle when slung, has been removed from the right hand side piece.
Summary: Associated with the service of 235080 Lieutenant Robert John Fletcher, 2 Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment (2 RAR). Bob Fletcher was born in Cowra in 1932, and entered the Royal Military College, Duntroon, in February 1951. He graduated in December 1954, and served with 2 RAR in Malaya between 1955 and 1957 commanding rifle and mortar platoons. The British Pattern 1944 Web Equipment was designed to replace the clumsy, noisy and heavy Pattern 1937 Equipment which was entirely unsuitable for jungle or tropical conditions. The Pattern 1944 was lighter (using mostly light alloy instead of brass fittings) and more comfortable, as well as being quicker drying and resistant to rotting. It was introduced too late to see general service in the Second World War, and was not manufactured or issued in Australia. Australian troops serving with British forces in Malaya during the 1950s were issued with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the info and suggestions. It's definitely not a British Pattern 1944, and I am 99.9% sure it is of Australian Manufacture. Even though it's been dyed a light green (it's a little greener "in person" than in the photos below), the webbing has the striations that I've seen in other Aussie webbing. Plus I got it in a box of assorted web gear I bought from an ebay seller in Australia.

Here are pictures. The second photo is a close-up of one of the tabs and D-rings.
 

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Posting this question here since I figure someone will know. I have an Australian P37 web belt that is light green in color (or should that be colour?), and it has an extra tab on each side with a small D ring hanging down. Were belts like this post-WWII use only?
That sounds like a '58 Pattern Belt. The two D rings are for hanging your Poncho cover from.

'44 Pattern belts are in three parts and would never be mistaken for '37 Pattern.

Just seen the picture. That looks like a mixture of '37 Pattern and '58 Pattern. I'd say that it was something made up for the civilian wannabe market.
 

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Sorry for the bad picture however. I purchased this from "Sportsmans Guide" (Edit: 3-4 years ago perhaps?) as a Australian "set" anyways the buttons on the ammo pouches were garbage, the belt was sized to fit a anorexic girl, sholder strap was meant for people who are not taller then about 5ft 10in, the Small pack was modfied as can be seen and the bandoleer was marked with the Australian Broad Arrow.



EDIT the colors don't match I messed up with the camera settings or something back in 2006 but the pouches were darker green, the belt a lime/green in the condition I described and the Bandoleer, Small Pack and Strap are the ones with a "nice" Khaki coloring.

Anyways my belt although hard to see came with 2 small D-rings attached. No idea if there was Broad Arrow marks on it or not, even so it looked plenty used and then flooded in the box it was in.

Needless to say I bought myself another belt set and ammo pouches and scrapped that belt (I think I may take a look for it) the strap barely fits me now that I'm 60 pounds lighter being 6ft 2in tall but then again I'm sure the Army didn't expect too many tall people in service of King and Country and had longer straps to suit us tall weirdo's. :p

Big question on my mind. If I remove the poncho/bedroll flap from the small pack you think it would cause much harm? :confused:

Dimitri
 

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Couple of things. Folks were smaller than and not as "horizontaly chalenged" as us Americans. Also the really small stuff usually didn't get issued and wound up on the surplus market.
Those pouches were usually issued to people who were not usually infantry, but in other trades, but needed to be armed on occasion.
 
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