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These have no drive bands, so could not be fired through a rifled barrel...There's also no threads in the hole in the base, which would be unable to use a plug....I would say these are training projectiles or something somebody just made to add fuses to and display....Bodes
 

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Looking at the picture of the base again, it does appear to have an ordnance stamp and ammunition lot information, but no size or round designation....I also don't see how brass would be practical for this type of projectile....Bodes
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yep thats what I was thinking brass wouldn't be that great .
Thanks tom
 

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The base of the projectile should have threads where a base fuse that had an inertia firing pin that would act when the projectile impacted depending on how the projectile was designed to function. Or should have a plug if the projectile was designed to operate via the nose fuse. And should have the bands swaged on the body of the projectile to engage the rifling when fired. Most if not all artillary,naval gun projectiles I have seen were made of steel with the brass/bronze rotating bands. Can you make out the information on the base of the projectile?. Frank
 

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I'm beginning to wonder if these brass rounds weren't perhaps used for setting up the machines?...You know, run a piece of stock that is more malleable to machine than steel....Once you get the series of machining processes down, you put steel stock in....Bodes
 

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It looks like the rotating bands were removed (the lip near the bottom). 105s wouldn’t have a base fuze, just a nose fuze. If there is a rear cavity, you’ll see female threads or shear pin holes for a base ejecting payload (usually illumination or smoke rounds). Extended range rounds could have a small cavity for what’s called a “base bleed” charge that produces gasses to reduce drag in flight. From these pictures, I doubt it’s any of those.

As for a brass 105, I couldn’t tell you what it was used for but I’d bet a 6 pack it was for some R&D or logistics purpose.

What fuze is in the nose? One looks like a solid shape and the other looks like a replica mech time fuze.

I see you picked up your Krag! Haha!


I Explosives
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Haha on krag .
I really don't know what the fuse are I think the one says dummy ,I just bought all the ordnance with the krag, forearms and bayonets.was curious abought the brass ones .here are the fuses pic.

Will keep look out for krag forearm for you at the gun shows I go to many thanks tom
 

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It looks like the rotating bands were removed (the lip near the bottom). 105s wouldn’t have a base fuze, just a nose fuze. If there is a rear cavity, you’ll see female threads or shear pin holes for a base ejecting payload (usually illumination or smoke rounds). Extended range rounds could have a small cavity for what’s called a “base bleed” charge that produces gasses to reduce drag in flight. From these pictures, I doubt it’s any of those.

As for a brass 105, I couldn’t tell you what it was used for but I’d bet a 6 pack it was for some R&D or logistics purpose.

What fuze is in the nose? One looks like a solid shape and the other looks like a replica mech time fuze.

I see you picked up your Krag! Haha!


I Explosives
I doubt you would need one specially made of brass for study purposes, when you could simply take a standard one off the assembly line....Just saying, Bodes
 

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The fuze on the left originally looked like a solid dummy but the other picture shows what appears to be a selector used on point detonating fuzes...one selection is instant, one is for a slight delay.

What do the bottom sides of the fuzes look like? Solid or threaded for a booster cup? Based on what I see so far, they look like trainers, not the firing type but for training troops.

Just had another thought...the brass projectiles could be used to slug the bore to determine the condition or wear of the barrel. Do you know any artillery type guys? They may know what a brass projo is/was used for.


I Explosives
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Have a friend that might know will take to him and see what he says many thanks again tom
 
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