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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got the opportunity to look at this beauty at a friend’s this evening and thought I’d share. It has probably the most unique “notch” system I’ve ever seen on a hunting rifle and is what’s prompting the share. Sorry my photos aren’t the best!

Original Listing: http://www.sitemason.com/page/bculAk
 

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WOW!! Just when you think you've seen it all. Would love to see the takedown system up close in all it's glory. The 6.5 Dutch sporting ammo must have been pretty scarce stuff even for a peer of the Crown. But then the means were just a trivial nuisance for a Baronet on holiday in the colonies, no?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I can't remember what it was used on but my friend had taken that rifle to Africa to take a couple of animals on his last trip there. I would love to have 10% of the knowledge many of you have on the high grade guns when I'm over in that trophy room as there are holland and holland's, griffin and howe's, german drillings, and a number of other old british manufacturers whom I don't recognize. That's not to mention the plethora of other old stuff (cane guns and older hunting swords with flintlock pistols around the handguards) lying around on leopard skins or propped against massive kudu horns.
 

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Way outside my knowledge here and quite possibly I'm missing something from the narrative! I just did a bit of superficial pix editing and below a better more detailed viewable edition. That before checking out the Web referenced, now noting its superior pix. I don't know exactly what Model Mannlicher here and confused by the "British bayonet" reference unless the rifle beginning life in military configuration??? Also, could it have started life as straight bolt handle design?
An interesting story by any account and quite unique product/collector piece!
Thanks for posting!
John
Rifle in Case Edit 1GB.png
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Way outside my knowledge here and quite possibly I'm missing something from the narrative! I just did a bit of superficial pix editing and below a better more detailed viewable edition. That before checking out the Web referenced, now noting its superior pix. I don't know exactly what Model Mannlicher here and confused by the "British bayonet" reference unless the rifle beginning life in military configuration??? Also, could it have started life as straight bolt handle design?
An interesting story by any account and quite unique product/collector piece!
Thanks for posting!
John View attachment 3840800
Thanks for uploading that! Looks much better. I think you're misreading "baronet" to read "bayonet". The Baronet was the original owner of the rifle. As to the gun it's a Dutch mannlicher but if it was a converted military action or not I don't know. Good question.
 

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Upon second glance it does look converted… I haven’t seen many civilian sporting rifles with a real mannlicher clip loading magazine. Usually they’re “Mannlichers” only in the sense that they’re made in Steyr with the Gew88 style bolt, or made anywhere, with a stock to the muzzle. This one is also chambered not for 6.5x54MS, but 6.5x53R Dutch… which seems to be almost exclusively a military round. So I’m inclined to think it’s a very nicely done, and doubtless expensive in the day, sporter, on a Dutch Mannlicher action. Very cool. Makes me want to load up some rounds for my Marechausee carbine and go hunting!
 

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there were a "few" English sporting rifles of this type, which were called, by the English, 256 Mannlicher. the Gibbs facility made some of them. but the Mauser action rifles seemed to become the more popular in the English market.

a bit of a enigma; two countries that were at war with each other, but some, "business as usual".
 

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Upon second glance it does look converted… I haven’t seen many civilian sporting rifles with a real mannlicher clip loading magazine. Usually they’re “Mannlichers” only in the sense that they’re made in Steyr with the Gew88 style bolt, or made anywhere, with a stock to the muzzle. This one is also chambered not for 6.5x54MS, but 6.5x53R Dutch… which seems to be almost exclusively a military round. So I’m inclined to think it’s a very nicely done, and doubtless expensive in the day, sporter, on a Dutch Mannlicher action. Very cool. Makes me want to load up some rounds for my Marechausee carbine and go hunting!
the only significant difference between 6,5 x54MS, and 6,5x53R Dutch is that the Dutch cartridge is rimmed, whereas the MS cartridge is not. the dimensions, otherwise, are pretty much identical, other than 1mm in length.
 

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the only significant difference between 6,5 x54MS, and 6,5x53R Dutch is that the Dutch cartridge is rimmed, whereas the MS cartridge is not. the dimensions, otherwise, are pretty much identical, other than 1mm in length.
Yep. I know the dies for 6.5MS will work with the Dutch round. I’m not aware of any real advantage of 6.5 Dutch over MS (or vice versa really), which makes me think the chambering of this Africa rifle is incidental upon its origin rather than a deliberate choice. (Aside from the fact that they’re both excellent and versatile…) Maybe the maker couldn’t obtain a Schoenauer magazine action? Maybe the baronet liked en-bloc clips? It’s just really interesting to me since I haven’t seen many Mannlicher-magazine sporters of the prewar sort (plenty of bubba-modded M95 Austrian rifles but that’s a rather different phenomenon.)
 

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you are SOOOO right about this type of rifle being in the "scarcer" group. both the MS style, and even more so the English type, such as we see in the OP.
 

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The 6.5x54R was orig a Military round. Steyr made the Mannlicher enbloc fed rifles for Holland (Mod 1895), Romania Model 1893 and Portugal Model 1896.
The Dutch version is easily ID'd by it's bolt body guide rib centered on the bolt handle shank. The other two don't have that feature.

The Steyr Mannlicher 'Schoenauer' is the rotary magazine fed rifle. The Greek govt bought it as a service rifle in a 1903 contract and in the 6.5x54 rimless caliber. Other contracts were later licensed out & made for Greece by Breda in Italy.

Both military versions were used by English, Scot and Irish gunsmiths to make custom rifles. Companies like George Gibbs & Co, Bristol England converted large numbers of Dutch Mannlichers to sporting rifles by restocking them, fitting quality sights, ect.
Some were converted to his proprietary 256 Gibbs Magnum cartridge. Others rebbl'd to such calibers as 375 Nitro Express Rimmed 2 1/2".
The Surplused Greek MAnnlicher Schoenauers from WW1 got the same treatment by the English and Scot gunmakers.

The EnBloc fed Mannlicher rifles as posted are quite popular with collectors and shooters of vintage rifles and usually go for good money. They are surely not an unkn in the world of quality hunting rifles.
 

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Thanks for uploading that! Looks much better. I think you're misreading "baronet" to read "bayonet". The Baronet was the original owner of the rifle. As to the gun it's a Dutch mannlicher but if it was a converted military action or not I don't know. Good question.
Yes, yes error and thanks for the correction for goodness sakes. Affixing a "bayonet" to rifle muzzle, enhancing lethality. Affixing a "Baronet" to a rifle muzzle, reduced "legality" and almost surely not to be assessed as a resulting "sporting shot!" :) :) :) (Dumb humor aside, misread almost surely as result of 'speedreading'!)

Below pix of my perhaps' similar Steyr Model 1904 Mannlicher military "Export Model". 12K quantity order. Mine, in 8x57J allegedly acquired from Steyr by Irish Ulster Volunteers (Protestants) c.1912, during "The Troubles". Mine with SN in 16K range.. Notably, it lacks the integral bolt guide mentioned above with the Dutch model. The magazine is such that the preloaded clips are dispensed from the open bottom as last round chambered.
Best!
John
 

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