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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There has been a sporterized G98 at a LGS for quite a while. The barrel, receiver, rear sight are all matching. However, the stock has been cut at the barrel band, and none of the other parts match anything else. Really quite a shame, since what is left of the wood, and the metal is really nice. The price is $199, but I may be able to get that down $20-30 dollars.

My question is, is it worth restoring as a shooter? I figure if I can score a cheap walnut stock, I can chop the front end (even a 98K stock should do if I just mill down the additional length. The missing hardware is around too.

Or, should I just wait to score something all original? While I would love to have a really nice one, I don't collect G98s, so I just want a shooter (but in original configuration). I just hate to see the old girl sitting there, half complete!
 

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The problem is a decent stock is going cost $$. I searched and waited, and finally got a complete K98 RC stock on fleabay for $100. It could take awhile to find one for a decent price, but it can be done.
 

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There is a good reason it's been at a LGS for quite a while. Good enough for anyone else to leave it there too................

A "shooter" is a shooter, configuration doesn't really compute.................
 

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The problem with using a K98k stock is that most are laminated wood, which will not match up well with your walnut. A walnut K98k stock will be harder to find and cost more. A Mauser at most any price is not a good candidate for "restoration".
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Guys

Thanks for the replies. I am an old hand at the gun game (very old, truth be known), and realize that you very seldom wind up with something that is worth more than what you put into it when you "restore" something. It is almost always a labor of love. I would really like a WWI dated GEW98, but the prices are pretty crazy on them now (like everything else). The last "deal" I saw on one was last year at an antique firearms show, and that was $550 for a very worn rifle with a mismatched bolt.

I know where I can get a Brazilian stock set, with all hardware for about $80, so I could wind up with a nice looking shooter for under $300. I would just have to modify the top handguard to fit the Lange sight setup. My back up plan was to buy a beat up stock, and cut off the front portion, and replace the "duffle bag cut" missing front end.

All of the long rifle variants of the Mauser are just beautiful pieces of work. My Dad had an Argentine 1909 when I was young. All matching and mint. He bought a 50 round box of ammo, and we never shot it all! Sure wish I knew what he did with it before he died.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
OK, call me a glutton for punishment, but I stopped by the LGS today for another look. I wasn't too concerned with the collector's details, as this is a parts gun anyway, but here are the highlights. It is a 1918 Amberg. The receiver, barrel, rear sight, stock (what is left of it,) and trigger guard (just the guard frame) match. The bolt body matches (although I think it has been re-numbered), but everything else is mixture of numbers. The floorplate and follower both have imperial proofs on them, and one of the trigger guard screws is numbered (but not matching). The bore looks like new.

I got the owner to drop the price to $150 out the door, so I put some money down on it until payday. If I throw some Czech/Brazilian wood and hardware on it, it will look right and make a nice shooter for just over $200. I should be able to get at least that for it if I ever want to sell it!

Anyone have any bands/floorpate/or followers numbered 98 they want to sell? :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Picked up the mauser today. It is a 1916 Amberg, not 1918. I HAVE to find a donor stock to replace the missing front section. The original stock is just covered in proofs, and I just want to restore it to original configuration. Anyone know a good method to repair a duffle bag type cut? With the cleaning rod channel in the way, there is no way to dowel the repair that I can see. The bore looks very nice, and it should shoot well. I think I will pick up a Brazilian stock set to shoot with, and continue to look for a good donor.
 

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Anyone know a good method to repair a duffle bag type cut? With the cleaning rod channel in the way, there is no way to dowel the repair that I can see.
What you do is drill out the cleaning rod channel to a larger diameter in both directions from the cut, and insert an appropriately sized (inside and outside diameter) length of steel, or copper, tubing as your 'dowel'. The cleaning rod will fit right down the tube, and forend alignment gets maintained.

With cross sectional area in the forend an issue, I go with 'stapling' the pieces together across the cut. I re-use the big copper staples that get used to hold large cardboard boxes together, reshape them into a long, square-cornered "U", cut a groove on the inside of the barrel channel across the cut for the staple to fit in, drill holes at each end for the vertical legs of the U, and epoxy the staples in place.

I would put one of these 'staples' on either side of the forend. Between the tube and the staples, that forend piece isn't going anywhere.

Oh, and don't forget to add a piece of wood at the cut to compensate for the width of the sawblade that made the cut.
 

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You are going to have a very nice shooter even if you stick with the 08 stock.

JG Sales used to have Israeli 98K stocks. The 7.62 mark will be cut off anyway. Not sure if they still do or what they go for now.

Please post some pictures when you get it put together. Lots of people spend $200 on a Turk!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for the replies! I have been searching all the boards, and have run a crossed a couple of variations of the brass tube and glued in fasteners mentioned above. Very clever, I never would have thought of using hobby brass tubing to bridge the splice.

The 98k stock is shorter from the lower band forward than the G98 (shorter barrel), so the only way to make that stock work as a donor is to actually carve it back in the lower band area when you cut it off. I only mentioned it as a last resort. The Brazilian stock is the way to go. I just wish I could find a donor that is severally damaged on the butt end, as I just hate to cut up a good stock!

Does anyone know if you can shorten a Brazilian handguard to work on the G98? I know the G98 and K98 use the same handguard, and I can get a Walnut one to use. However, if I wind up picking up a 1908 stock set, I would hate to waste money on a handguard I can't use!


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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Well, live and learn! I finally got a chance to clean the rifle up. I never noticed, but the barrel is counter bored 1 1/2"!!! In my concern for the stock, I over looked it. I guess on my first range outing, I will see if it messed up the accuracy any.

Since the bolt has been rebuilt, and the but plate is stamped with a 4 and M (rebuild marks), I wonder if the barrel was counter bored at that time?

Speaking of the stock, I can't use the brass tube in the repair. It seems the cleaning rod nut on the G98 is located under the lower band. The cut nose of the stock shows part of the cutout for the nut. Need to figure out another way to reinforce the splice.


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along with the brass tube, you can use 6 or 8-32 threaded rod with devcon. put some devcon in the rod holes and on the threads along with a few hack marks on the tube and some devcon on that as well. assemble and make sure you have some devcon between the faces of the wood. the key is to use Vaseline on the barrel and barrel channel so disassembly will be easy. you will have to make up a spacer matching the cross section and appropriate thickness that matches the saw blade thickness.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Kursk,

Thanks for your reply.

The brass tube will not be needed, nor will it fit. Its purpose is to reinforce the splice, and provide a clear path for the cleaning rod. Since the cleaning rod nut on the G98 is located exactly under the lower band (where the cut is), the nut is in the way of the repair. The brass tube/threaded rod method was conceived for rifles like the 98k, that has the rod nut inbedded in the stock further down, where it is not in the way of the duffle bag cut. The nut is also large enough to be in the way of the threaded rod. I will figure out something!

As far as the spacer goes, that is not needed either. Remember I am not trying to reconnect the original cut off piece of stock, it is long gone! Since my plan is to splice in the front of another donor stock, l will just cut the replacement long enough for everthing to line up after the repair is made.

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
If it was counter-bored because the crown was damaged it should restore accuracy if done properly.
Ya, know the whole counterbore thing. I have two Mosins that are bored, and a Berthier in desperate need of it. I had just never seen a Mauser bored by the Germans before, and wanted to confirm it was done during a German rebuild.
 
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