Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,985 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good evening everyone! Today I managed to score a nice 1896 Tula M91! Not only is it Finn'ed but it has Austrian markings as well!

Here's one picture of it and I will just post the GB link here so you all can see the detailed pictures. If there is anything to note that I might have missed about the rifle, please let me know! :thumbsup:

LINK: http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=426127262

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,941 Posts
Oh very nice find! I love the old M91s. Well, they are all technically old, but the earlier date the better IMO. Nice OEWG Austrian mark on there too! Interesting line on the left shank too. Congrats on a nice acquisition!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,505 Posts
Nice but what was paid is awfully terribly steep . But if you want it bad enough it's worth it . Resale at that is a tough one
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,985 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank you everyone! I am interested to see about this rifle in person, it's just sad I'll be out of town for a week and it'll be sitting at my home in a box till I get back! Ughhh!

I offered a decent price but I didn't purchase it for $500 though, I don't plan on selling it for a while either since I've been looking for a double marked M91 for quite some time.
 

·
Super Moderator
Field Editor ~ GUNS Magazine, Co-Author ~ Serbian Army Weapons of Victory &PH - Kudu Safaris
Joined
·
11,752 Posts
How are both sides of the rear sight base numbered???

JPS

Never mind......I missed the auction link photos.

Almost an extremely rare rifle until the Finns got their grubby little mitts on it! Too bad. It would have been worth three or four times what you paid for it had it not passed through Finland! As the old saying goes, "Close!......but NO CIGAR!"

Ce la Vie!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,985 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks everyone! It's okay the Finns got a hold of it. If it didn't, I don't think I would have been able to get it as the bidding on it probably would have skyrocketed haha.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,929 Posts
This rifle defended Finland after defending the Czar's empire and then fought in WWI. Maybe it's less rare than an untouched Imperial rifle, but certainly it has at least as honorable service, and probably has had a more interesting life.

But I'm primarily a Finn collector - and frankly it would not interest me in the least in its un-Finned state. I like guns used by the good guys and the underdogs. Silly of me, probably, but there you have it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
380 Posts
How are both sides of the rear sight base numbered???

JPS

Never mind......I missed the auction link photos.

Almost an extremely rare rifle until the Finns got their grubby little mitts on it! Too bad. It would have been worth three or four times what you paid for it had it not passed through Finland! As the old saying goes, "Close!......but NO CIGAR!"

Ce la Vie!
Were you thinking 8x50 conversion?
 

·
Super Moderator
Field Editor ~ GUNS Magazine, Co-Author ~ Serbian Army Weapons of Victory &PH - Kudu Safaris
Joined
·
11,752 Posts
Not thinking, that IS what it WAS.

Look at the left side of the rear sight base. It's marked in Schritt and the majority of the conversions to 8x50mmR were performed by Steyr, hence the "OEWG" mark on the receiver flat. It was stamped with a broken "W". It also has an Austro-Hungarian serial number added on the left side of the reciever.

The Finns acquired it after the war and sleeved the chamber back to 7.62x54mmR. Personally, I wouldn't fire it. I would deem it potentially dangerous to shoot.

Regards,

JPS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
380 Posts
Not thinking, that's IS what it WAS.

Look at the left side of the rear sight base. It's marked in Schritt and the majority of the conversions to 8x50mmR were performed by Steyr, hence the "OEWG" mark on the receiver flat. It was stamped with a broken "W". It also has an Austro-Hungarian serial number added on the left side of the reciever.

The Finns acquired it after the war and sleeved the chamber back to 7.62x54mmR. Personally, I wouldn't fire it. I would deem it potentially dangerous to shoot.

Regards,

JPS
Ah, yes. Didn't see left side of the rear sight in the auction pics. Looked at the pics the seller posted on the other forum, there they are - lined out Schritt gradations. Although the font, particularly on the "3", is a little different from the one on my Finn-sleeved re-conversion.

What percentage of Austrian captures that went through OEWG were converted to 8x50?

As an aside, there was a M28 on auction recently which had a rear sight base with unmolested Schritt gradations on left side and Finn gradations on right side. Finns recycled that base of Austrian converted rifle.
 

·
Super Moderator
Field Editor ~ GUNS Magazine, Co-Author ~ Serbian Army Weapons of Victory &PH - Kudu Safaris
Joined
·
11,752 Posts
While I have seen many Finnish rebuilds where a Schritt marked rear sight base was used with an entirely different rifle, in this case the presence of Steyr's marking along with the Austro-Hungarian serial number pretty much guarantee that this barreled action and rear sight base are from an original Austro-Hungarian conversion to 8x50mmR.

By September 30th 1915, a total of 114,701 rifles had been converted by Steyr, AZF and JSE. The majority of these conversions were performed by Steyr. It is believed that FGGY in Budapest also converted an unknown number of rifles, however their records were destroyed during WWII. While there may be a breakdown of the 114,701 rifles somewhere in the K.u.K. Archives, I have yet to see copies of the documents that were used to compile this number? The total may have simply been provided in an update that did not provide a breakdown by source.

Hope this helps!

JPS
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top