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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've had these two Chinese manufactured (I assume it was China) ) broomhandle stocks since the mid-80's and early '90's.

Neither of them appears to be of the same quality level that the more recent stocks that we see imported here are. Mine are much cruder in terms of fit and finish.

Each of these two stocks is quite different from the other. The wood seems different, the hardware is definitely different. The finish was sloppily applied.
Stock #2 has matching assembly numbers 203 on both the lid and body. (visible next to the hinge, and seen when in the open position)

My question:
Were these stocks produced for export to go with the Chinese C96 imports of the '80s ?
Or were these made for Chinese use ?

I'd appreciate any info.
Regards, Ned

Stock #1

 

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The modern made repros generally have Phillips screws. These two don't. As you may know, Chinese war industries in WW2 and the Communist Revolution right afterwards were operating under last ditch conditions. Niceties like fit and finish were low priorities and it shows on their rifles and bayonets of the period. Having said that, there are no markings to help ID and I don't know of a way to positively date these stocks. Sorry, couldn't be more definitive. Interesting, though.
 

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I bought a Chinese stock back in the 80's that is the same as the second style shown by the OP. Maybe I was lucky but the fit was actually really good on my stock. I removed all of the hardware and sent it out to be blued (was not expensive back then) and then I stripped and refinished the wood myself. It looks like a million dollars now and goes beautifully with my Mauser manufactured broomhandle. You could say as initially manufactured, the stock was a diamond in the rough. It just needed some TLC.
 

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They look like they were mfg for Chinese use / police forces , the crudeness looks similar to the military sks rifles, the finish has a low sheen just like many of the Vietnam war era sks stocks.

Chinese firearms often function better than they look , they dont try to make it look like a fine piece of furniture, they're more concerned with function / practical use.

I have a surplus Chinese sks that had a rough stock with varnish finish, and you could see some chipped spots, but it works just fine, and it came like that from the factory in new condition.
 
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