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Platinum Bullet Member/Moderator
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Discussion Starter #1
Walked the show twice and came home. One fellow had a No.32 Mk1 scope, first model adjusting tool and metal case for the measly sum of $2200! He also had a British No.4 Mk1(T) rifle for $800 that might have been good at one time before the new post war wood, new mfg cheek piece, possible new made Mk1 rear sight and a new funky phos job. There were some Lees but nothing exceptional or to me reasonable.

A fair condition military Adams revolver with 30% smaller wood grip fit was available for a modest $1100. I stood around for awhile but did not see a line form to purchase it.

I think we are getting near the point where you can no longer afford to be a generalist Lee collector or collector of all Briitish Military small arms. Specialization may be necessary. The Left Boot may have the right idea in collecting, in his case, .22 caliber only. Sigh!
 

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Paul,
Just think of the Dollar as a single square of toilet paper and the new price structures will seem less insane.
I am going to Tulsa in October----I shudder to think of what I might find at the end of that 6.5 hour drive...
-----krinko
 

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Platinum Bullet Member/Moderator
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Discussion Starter #3
I appreciate your analogy but when it comes to Tulsa, money is not on rolls, they just weight it when you buy something. The state motto is "Keep Oklahoma green--bring money."
 

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There are a few reasons why I got into a major portion of my L-E's being .22's (a plurality.):

1) Dumb luck - In my early days of collecting (1999-2002) some of the more collectable L-E's I found were .22's;

2) Shootability - I am more comfortable shooting my .22's than my .303's. By comfortable I mean less concern over damaging a major investment. Shooting .22's will not cause the stock of a 100 year old weapon to crack. I fear such if I shot my '04 LSA I* **, my 1901 NZ cavalry carbine, or my 1896 BSA MLE I, etc. I do not fear shooting my 1901 Sparkbrooke Sht. 22 II N;

3) I like how they are an extra bit more scarce than a .303. An NRF? Scarce. An NRF converted to .22? Very cool and likely far more scarce. How many have seen an Ishapore .22?

Still though, I do have much to obtain:

1) No.5 Trials .22 (My Holy Graille)
2) No.8
3) No.9
4) MLE .22

While L-E .22's are in my blood, I do have the overall Lee-Enfield virus and want them ALL!! ;')
 

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There was a gentleman with a #8 at the show. Pretty nifty rifle. I thought it looked like a L42A1. Went for 800.oo I think. Only lasted on the table for about an hour.
 

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I am at a point, a point that Paul is likely making reference, where I am getting more and more willing to trade/sell many of my L-E .303's in order to obtain L-E .22's.

If I went to a show and saw a $800 No. 8, I would not be able to buy it unless he held it while I traded off some of my .303's.

Damn school loans will be the death of me! :'(
 

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While I can't buy the really pricey stuff, I still think it's wise to pick up an inexpensive L-E whenever I find them for a good deal. Eventually even the common .303's in nice shape will be more than I want to spend, so I'm getting what I can now. I figure in 5-10 years, even that pricey FTR No4 I posted about will seem like a good deal.
 
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