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My father served on the USS New Orleans at the same time as Joe Herman. His war diary is below. He records the incident on April 22, 1944 that Joe Herman related about a TBF crashing into the mast, killing 3 on the aircraft and 1 on the ship.

War Diary of Clifford R. Utterback
Chief Petty Officer, USN 1935-1955

My father, Clifford R. Utterback, 1917-2007, was a 20 year career U.S. Navy veteran. He served on the first three purpose built aircraft carriers Ranger, Lexington, and Saratoga before WWII. During WWII he served as Aviation Chief of the heavy cruiser USS New Orleans in the Pacific. His job there was senior enlisted man of the aviation department. His rate was originally Aviation Chief Metalsmith but the name was later changed to Aviation Chief Structural Mechanic.
What follows is a transcription of his war diary from 29 Sep 43 to 14 Feb 45.

left Pearl Harbor Sept 29
arrived at Wake Island
Oct 5, ’43, We hit Wake
Island with 6 Carriers
Cruisers, Destroyers, etc.
We encountered stiff
A.A. and Counter Battery
Fire. New Orleans lost
1 S.O.C., but pilot and
radioman were saved,
altho’ both were ser-
iously wounded.

Nov. 20. Shelled Makin.

Dec. 4, We shot down
1 Jap Kate, and were
at General Quarters
for 7½ hours during
a bad nite torpedo
plane attack at Kwajalien

Jan 29, ’44, We shelled
Taroa. They returned
fire – very close. We
sunk 1 A.K., Hit 1 AO.

Jan 31 – Feb 1[SUP]st[/SUP] at Kwaj-
alien. Landed troops.

Feb. 16, We hit Truk
with Carrier planes.
Chased, overtook, and
Sank 1 Jap CL, 1 Jap DD,
1 Jap AK., one Jap plane.

Feb. 21. Jap Betty Air
Attack. Rugged.

Feb. 22. Hit Marianas
with Carrier planes

Mar. 29. Nite Betty Attack.

Mar. 30. Carrier plane
raid on Palau. 12
Bettys attacked us at
nite.

Mar. 31 Hit them again.
Three more Bettys splash-
ed. One of our destroyers
sinks Jap AK. (He re-
fused our offer of aid.
said he could do it. He
did.)

Apr. 1. Hit Wolai.

Apr. 21 Hit Hollandia
New Guinea. Two of
our fighters got Two
Bettys.

Apr. 22. Bad Accident –
One of our TBF’s took
off a Carrier before dawn,
and crashed into our
mast, killing 3 men
in plane and one on
ship.

Apr. 23. (My Birthday)
Hit Hollandia again.

Apr. 25, Splash 4 Bogies.

Apr. 29. We hit Truk
with Carrier planes.
15 Zeros attack our
Combat Air Patrol. 3
Zeros got through
to our ships, but
we got them. Our
planes destroyed 80
planes on ground, 37
in Air, and Sunk 8
AK’s. Bogies at Nite.

Apr. 30, 0730 Bogies.
Jap Subs all around.
Our destroyers are con-
tinously dropping depth
charges. We Bombard
Satawan at 1630. No re-
turn fire.

May 1. Battleships and
planes hit Ponape.
May 12. First time a-
shore since we left
Pearl Harbor. We Chiefs
had a beer party on
Rita Island in the
Majuro Attol (Marshall Is.)

June 6. Europe Invaded.
We leave Majuro.
June 7. Arrive Roi.
June 8. Underway for
Marianas Invasion.

June 12. Carrier Planes
hit Saipan, Tinian, and
Guam.

June 13. New Battleships
hit Saipan.

June 14. We run up the
channel between Saipan
and Tinian to draw
Jap fire, to knock
out their shore batteries.

June 15. We lose one
of my planes by
accident. Pilot and
radioman picked up,
uninjured, by us. We
go in close to fire
at installations. Japs
attack us at dusk with
planes.

June 1. We are Bom-
barding Guam when
we are recalled to
join our battle fleet
to meet Jap Fleet.

June 17. We meet
up with our Battle
Fleet. 7 New Super Battle
Ships, 8 Light Carriers,
7 Big Carriers, Cruisers,
Destroyers, etc.

June 18 – We play Hide
and Seek with Jap
Fleet, at full speed.

June 19. They really
hit us today, but
we have excellent
luck. One Battleship
was hit by dive bomber.
A lot of near misses.
Planes all over hell.
Sky black for miles
with our A.A. Fire.
Our Combat Air Patrols
got most of the Jap
planes on the way in,
but still we had a
lot of action. We were
hit by dive-bombers,
high altitude bombers,
Torpedo planes all at
the same time. A total
of nearly 400 Jap planes
were destroyed that day
and the Jap Fleet took
off for Japan at full
speed, with us in
pursuit. Couldn’t get
close enough for sur-
face combat.
June 20. We launched
three air attack groups of 40
planes each. They hit
the Jap Fleet about
dark, hard. We were
still recovering our
planes at 2300 with
our carriers lit up
like Xmas trees. We
lost a lot of planes, but
picked up most of the
crews later. Our planes
sunk 1 Heavy Cruiser,
3 transports, one destroyer,
damaged one Battleship, one
Heavy Cruiser, one destroyer,
Two Carriers, etc.

July 8-12 – Bombarded Guam.

July 13 Anchored at Saipan.
Dead Japs and Greek
Flies very thick. Awful
Smell.
July 19. Bombarded Guam.

July 21. Invaded Guam.

July 22-23 Bombarded
Tinian.

July 24. Invaded Tinian.
Colorado hit 21 times.
Norman Scott hit. Many
Killed.
July 26-Aug. 1 Bombarded Guam.
Aug 1-10, Supported Ground
troops on Guam. Often
Fired around the clock.

Aug 10. Marianas ours.
We get underway for
Eniwetok.

Aug 14. Anchored at Eni-
wetok in Marshall Group.

Aug 15. I am transferred
to USS ???????? (ship) for
transportation to Pearl.

Aug. 22 – Arrive Pearl.

Aug 26. I am assigned
to N.A.T.S.

Feb 14, ’45 I am flown to Alameda
on the Mars, and assigned to
VR-3, with 30 days leave
& four days travel time.


Later additions are in Italics.

NAVAL AIR TRANSPORT SQUADRON THREE (VR-3)
Established December 1941 - NAS Fairfax, KS
Relocated January 1944 - NAS Olathe, KS
Relocated January 1946 - NAS Patuxent River, MD

I was born at Gardner, KS (next to NAS Olathe, KS) on January 14, 1946. Shortly after that our family was transferred to NAS Patuxent River, MD.


Definitions:

AA = anti aircraft

AK = attack transport (ship) carries troops and landing craft

AO = fleet oiler (ship) a tanker carrying fuel for ships and aircraft

Betty = Japanese twin engine bomber plane

bogies = unidentified aircraft

CL = light cruiser (ship)

carrier = aircraft carrier (ship)

Chiefs = Chief Petty Officers, the USN senior non-commissioned officer rank

Colorado = The USN battleship USS Colorado. On 24 July 1944, during the shelling of Tinian, the battleship USS Colorado BB 45 received 22 shell hits from shore batteries but continued to support the invading troops until 3 August.

Combat Air Patrol = fighter planes kept in the air in relays during daylight in combat operations

Counter Battery Fire = fire from enemy shore batteries (artillery)

DD = destroyer (ship)

General Quarters = battle stations

Greek flies = big flies ??

Kate = Japanese single engine torpedo plane

Mars = USN four engine flying boat JRM transport plane

NATS = Naval Air Transport Service

New Orleans = The USS New Orleans, a heavy cruiser, my father’s ship

Norman Scott = The USN destroyer USS Norman Scott (ship). During the invasion of Tinian the battle ship USS Colorado BB 45 was being attacked by shore batteries. While drawing fire away from the USS Colorado the Norman Scott was hit six times within a few seconds by counterfire. The USS Norman Scott lost her captain, Seymour Owens, and 22 others, with an additional 57 wounded.

SOC = Scout Observation Curtiss, a USN two seat, single engine, biplane, floatplane observation aircraft. The USS New Orleans carried – I think – 4: two operational and two with wings folded.

sub = submarine (ship)

TBF = Torpedo Bomber Grumman, a USN single engine torpedo plane with a normal crew of three

VR-3 = USN Transport (aircraft) Squadron 3

Zero = Japanese single engine fighter plane
 

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Awesome indeed. Both the OP's story and geladen's.

Wonder what the Chief's cabbage patch looked like? And wonder if his service on Lex (CV-2, converted battlecruiser) over-lapped Robert A. Heinlein's?

Curious that his service and Joe Herman's was on New Orleans at the same time. Wonder if they knew each other?
 

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Awesome indeed. Both the OP's story and geladen's.

Wonder what the Chief's cabbage patch looked like? And wonder if his service on Lex (CV-2, converted battlecruiser) over-lapped Robert A. Heinlein's?

Curious that his service and Joe Herman's was on New Orleans at the same time. Wonder if they knew each other?
I don't know when my Dad was on the Lex, just some time between 1935 and 1941. He was also on the Sara and Ranger during that period. I also don't know when Heinlein was on the Lex but I have every book he wrote.

It's doubtful that my Dad and Joe Herman knew each other; their duties were too different.

Here's a story from the New Orleans. The Captain was regular Navy as was my Dad. My Dad's Division Officer was a reserve. The Captain avoided speaking to reserve officers. When there was a problem related to the aircraft, they would hear on the ship's PA "Aviation Chief to the bridge!". The Captain would deal with the Aviation Chief and Dad would come back and tell his Division Officer what was going on.

By "cabbage patch" I assume you mean ribbons/medals. That must be an Army term. Photo below.

1. Navy Good Conduct, 4 awards (third bar missing)
2. American Defense, Fleet Bar/star
3. American Campaign
4. Pacific Campaign, 6 campaign stars
5. WWII Victory
6. National Defense (Korea)
 

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We called it "Fruit Salad", not cabbage patch.

I don't know when my Dad was on the Lex, just some time between 1935 and 1941. He was also on the Sara and Ranger during that period. I also don't know when Heinlein was on the Lex but I have every book he wrote.

It's doubtful that my Dad and Joe Herman knew each other; their duties were too different.

Here's a story from the New Orleans. The Captain was regular Navy as was my Dad. My Dad's Division Officer was a reserve. The Captain avoided speaking to reserve officers. When there was a problem related to the aircraft, they would hear on the ship's PA "Aviation Chief to the bridge!". The Captain would deal with the Aviation Chief and Dad would come back and tell his Division Officer what was going on.

By "cabbage patch" I assume you mean ribbons/medals. That must be an Army term. Photo below.

1. Navy Good Conduct, 4 awards (third bar missing)
2. American Defense, Fleet Bar/star
3. American Campaign
4. Pacific Campaign, 6 campaign stars
5. WWII Victory
6. National Defense (Korea)
 

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It must have been on the JPS WWI board that I once told a telephonic conversation between my two year older brother (°1943) and myself. In short: "Hey Paul do you have any idea what dad's medals would be worth?". I asked him if he would think about to sell them. This was his intention. WTF? Not in my lifetime! I gave him, in return, a couple of 19th century military epaulettes he could sell knowing he needed some money to keep his ex wife under financial control. I will never forgive him to have lost/selled the '14-18 fire card' with the most possible front stripes (8) in the Belgian army of 14-18... with the only known full size picture of our dad in his 20ties. I confess that I regularly give the third degree interrogation to my two nieces in an attempt to know wheren that firecard went. It's not always the most valuable things that are important in one's life, simple and cheap remnants may be priceless.
 
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This last Post that Bill makes, the photo of his Dad's campaign ribbons, strongly points out something that causes me a slight case of "heartburn" that I've ridiculed for some time now.

Here we have a man, Bill's Dad, who saw intense combat throughout WWII right through the Korean War, 20 years total service, and yet has no more than SIX SERVICE RIBBONS! In my opinion this is as it should be! THESE RIBBONS MEAN SOMETHING! My Dad flew 30ish something combat bombing missions as crew chief in a B-24 Liberator. His kid brother made 6 war patrols off Japan in an old diesel boat, the Blenny, hull # 324. Neither of them had any more combat related ribbons than Bill's Dad, and probably not that many!

Look at modern conditions in the Military, all branches....A chest full of campaign ribbons on the left side even slopping over to the right side of dress uniforms---15 to 20 different ribbons/awards! I sometimes think that a ribbon is given for throwing the trash over the side of the ship 10 times in a month! Am I wrong to think like this? Correct me if I am! (I'm retired Navy, by the way.)
 

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I agree, totally. Today, senior officers, particularly, wear so many ribbons that they look grotesque. Even a seaman apprentice, right out of boot camp, wears a ribbon, the National Defense Service Medal, that is handed out automatically if you served in any capacity during certain specified dates. I shouldn't be too critical - I served as an officer in the Navy for five years, and the only medal I received was the NDSM, which was like a Miss Congeniality Award.
 

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We are 1st generation immigrants (legal), so we don't have anyone as our direct relatives who served in US armed forces. But yet every year for 5 years my wife and I bring our two young kids to Fort Rosecrans national cemetery to lay down in front of one headstone a small bundle of flesh flowers cut from our garden.

It is a grave we "adopted". Below the headstone lies a marines officer we don't personally know. No madels nor ribbons, but just a few words carved under the cross on the white marble.

James Roscoe Arnette
Iowa
U.S. Marines Corps
Lt. Col.
WWI, WWII
1888 - 1969

We drove by the cemetery on many occasions. Our daughter noticed this headstone never had flowers. On that day I declared it is "ours".

Just something we can do to show our gratitude. Without him and the others who served and sacrificed, we won't be here living a good life.

-TL
 

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This last Post that Bill makes, the photo of his Dad's campaign ribbons, strongly points out something that causes me a slight case of "heartburn" that I've ridiculed for some time now.

Here we have a man, Bill's Dad, who saw intense combat throughout WWII right through the Korean War, 20 years total service, and yet has no more than SIX SERVICE RIBBONS! In my opinion this is as it should be! THESE RIBBONS MEAN SOMETHING! My Dad flew 30ish something combat bombing missions as crew chief in a B-24 Liberator. His kid brother made 6 war patrols off Japan in an old diesel boat, the Blenny, hull # 324. Neither of them had any more combat related ribbons than Bill's Dad, and probably not that many!

Look at modern conditions in the Military, all branches....A chest full of campaign ribbons on the left side even slopping over to the right side of dress uniforms---15 to 20 different ribbons/awards! I sometimes think that a ribbon is given for throwing the trash over the side of the ship 10 times in a month! Am I wrong to think like this? Correct me if I am! (I'm retired Navy, by the way.)
Despite being the beneficiary of a (fairly) liberal medals/awards policy (ARCOM w/1st OLC; NDSM; Armed Forces Reserve Medal; Vietnam Campaign and Vietnam Service with four campaign stars; RVN Cross of Gallantry w/Palm), seems a bit excessive today.

I agree, totally. Today, senior officers, particularly, wear so many ribbons that they look grotesque. Even a seaman apprentice, right out of boot camp, wears a ribbon, the National Defense Service Medal, that is handed out automatically if you served in any capacity during certain specified dates. I shouldn't be too critical - I served as an officer in the Navy for five years, and the only medal I received was the NDSM, which was like a Miss Congeniality Award.
Well, everybody got the NDSM if they were AD after it was authorized - means the same thing as any other service medal does, that you had service. I found it sort of embarrassing to see it in all its lonesome glory until I got back from RVN and the only time I wore a uniform displaying it was for my official picture (orders).

We are 1st generation immigrants (legal), so we don't have anyone as our direct relatives who served in US armed forces. But yet every year for 5 years my wife and I bring our two young kids to Fort Rosecrans national cemetery to lay down in front of one headstone a small bundle of flesh flowers cut from our garden.

It is a grave we "adopted". Below the headstone lies a marines officer we don't personally know. No madels nor ribbons, but just a few words carved under the cross on the white marble.

James Roscoe Arnette
Iowa
U.S. Marines Corps
Lt. Col.
WWI, WWII
1888 - 1969

We drove by the cemetery on many occasions. Our daughter noticed this headstone never had flowers. On that day I declared it is "ours".

Just something we can do to show our gratitude. Without him and the others who served and sacrificed, we won't be here living a good life.

-TL
A good thing your family is doing, sir. Tried to look him up for more information (a Marine LTC with service in WWI and WWII is likely to have had an "interesting" life and likely a number of medals and decorations), but no luck. I did find he lost a son in infancy, in 1928, who is buried in the USNA cemetery.
 

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I also tried looking him up, but couldn't find anything either. Almost for sure no one has visited the grave for years. Perhaps he has no one who can get to the grave.

Years ago the pastor of our church told us the origin of memorial day in his Sunday sermon. It used to be called decoration day. It started not long after end of civil war, when ladies in South volunteered to clean up and decorate forgotten graves of Yankee soldiers. We are doing the same; something we should do.

-TL
 

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This last Post that Bill makes, the photo of his Dad's campaign ribbons, strongly points out something that causes me a slight case of "heartburn" that I've ridiculed for some time now.

Here we have a man, Bill's Dad, who saw intense combat throughout WWII right through the Korean War, 20 years total service, and yet has no more than SIX SERVICE RIBBONS! In my opinion this is as it should be! THESE RIBBONS MEAN SOMETHING! My Dad flew 30ish something combat bombing missions as crew chief in a B-24 Liberator. His kid brother made 6 war patrols off Japan in an old diesel boat, the Blenny, hull # 324. Neither of them had any more combat related ribbons than Bill's Dad, and probably not that many!

Look at modern conditions in the Military, all branches....A chest full of campaign ribbons on the left side even slopping over to the right side of dress uniforms---15 to 20 different ribbons/awards! I sometimes think that a ribbon is given for throwing the trash over the side of the ship 10 times in a month! Am I wrong to think like this? Correct me if I am! (I'm retired Navy, by the way.)
When I finished my four years in the USAF and came back from Vietnam, I had 10 ribbons. Three were unit awards. Later I found out I was due one more, the USAF Overseas Service Short Tour ribbon with one oak leaf cluster (see signature photo). When my Dad saw them he asked me "How'd you get so many ribbons?" I told him I went into the BX and bought one of each kind they had in stock.

I agree that ribbons today or even back in 1970 (mine) do not mean what they did in WWII. Someone once asked me what the first ribbon was for and I told him "perfect attendance in Sunday School".

Then I volunteered for 11 years in Civil Air Patrol / Air Search & Rescue and got 10 more ribbons. They were almost going over my shoulder and down my back - but I guess it was OK since in CAP they don't pay you in cash, so they pay you with ribbons.
 

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Not so kind to say to people who realy value personal medals but I had/have the proof of what my dad once said to my mom when I was youngster. Note that he, as an officer, had to pay himself for any medal, uniform etc.
I remember it word for word: "Do they realy think I'm gonna pay for some palms and swords to clip on those medals?".
I have his medals and I have his military file (on photo) and thus know what he refused to spend money on. Ridiculous for some but the least of worries for him. The man wasn't interested in medals and the like, he lived his two WW's and was an excellent mentor to his sons by teaching them to make a difference between what's important and what isn't.
Sorry to rant ... I needed that!
 

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Not so kind to say to people who realy value personal medals but I had/have the proof of what my dad once said to my mom when I was youngster. Note that he, as an officer, had to pay himself for any medal, uniform etc.
I remember it word for word: "Do they realy think I'm gonna pay for some palms and swords to clip on those medals?".
I have his medals and I have his military file (on photo) and thus know what he refused to spend money on. Ridiculous for some but the least of worries for him. The man wasn't interested in medals and the like, he lived his two WW's and was an excellent mentor to his sons by teaching them to make a difference between what's important and what isn't.
Sorry to rant ... I needed that!
No one here is saying that they do not value WWI and WWII awards. The problem is that the US military passes out awards so freely today that they (except for the top few medals) have lost much of the perceived value.

My Dad received six medals for 20 years service and 1 1/2 years of combat in the Pacific. In 1970 I received 11 medals and ribbons for 4 years service and 2 years in Vietnam. Today the ratio is even worse.
 

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When I see photos of
Petraeus I have the urge to laugh. He seems to be wearing a load of medals that signify nothing important.
In comparison my dad and his twin both fought in WWII in the USMC.
My uncle was only in combat from Feb 19 to 26 1945 on Iwo Jima. He was in what was reputed to be the company with the largest number of KIAs (69) in that battle. He received 4 medals, the Asiatic Pacific Campaign Medal, WWII Victory Medal, the PUC awarded to his regiment and a Purple Heart. That was not much to show for being sent home permanently 100% disabled.

My dad was in combat maybe 45 days total on Guadalcanal, Tarawa and Saipan. He was nearly killed by artillery and later suffered a serious gunshot wound. He was sent home permanently disabled. His medals included the same as my uncle including the PUC and Purple Heart.
His US Army 27th Infantry Division counterparts on Saipan would have be awarded the Combat Infantryman's Badge. The Marines got nothing of the sort.

 

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In WW2 there was one campaign ribbon with additional stars. Nowadays there is a Campaign ribbon for each place ; Somalia, Kuwait, Iraq, Afghanistan, War on Terror, Syria (soon I would expect) yada yada. To be able to read it just lets a person know where they have been but to read above a certain line you start getting into the meat of their career: BS, PH, PUC, CAR, SS yada.

Impressive to the uninitiated eye unless you know what your looking at. Still they are deserved bragging rights by those who earn them even if a little crowded and some not as heavy as others.

Though a little crowded even now I would stand up and take notice of these .......( Oh HeartBreak ridge as an example) Notice most of the bottom three rows are just letting you know where he has been. In WW2 there would only be one ribbon with multiple stars.

 

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In WW2 there was one campaign ribbon with additional stars. Nowadays there is a Campaign ribbon for each place ; Somalia, Kuwait, Iraq, Afghanistan, War on Terror, Syria (soon I would expect) yada yada. To be able to read it just lets a person know where they have been but to read above a certain line you start getting into the meat of their career: BS, PH, PUC, CAR, SS yada.

Impressive to the uninitiated eye unless you know what your looking at. Still they are deserved bragging rights by those who earn them even if a little crowded and some not as heavy as others.

Though a little crowded even now I would stand up and take notice of these .......( Oh HeartBreak ridge as an example) Notice most of the bottom three rows are just letting you know where he has been. In WW2 there would only be one ribbon with multiple stars.

View attachment 2265090
That spread is rather impressive. Especially the one on top... Note the for valor V on the bronze Star - something General Petraeus' ribbon seems to lack.

WWII actually had several campaign and service medals. American Defense, Europe-Africa, and Asia-Pacific come to mind. What you got depended on where you served, and I knew a couple of WWII vets who were in both North Africa and Sicily and then did time on Okinawa, so they had both of those medals , plus (of course) WWII Victory Medal and Army of Occupation with Japan Clasp. And then there was the Marine who was on Guadalcanal while it was hot, and then served on USS Texas for Overlord as part of her Marine detachment. Not sure there were a lot of those.
 

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That spread is rather impressive. Especially the one on top... Note the for valor V on the bronze Star - something General Petraeus' ribbon seems to lack.

WWII actually had several campaign and service medals. American Defense, Europe-Africa, and Asia-Pacific come to mind. What you got depended on where you served, and I knew a couple of WWII vets who were in both North Africa and Sicily and then did time on Okinawa, so they had both of those medals , plus (of course) WWII Victory Medal and Army of Occupation with Japan Clasp. And then there was the Marine who was on Guadalcanal while it was hot, and then served on USS Texas for Overlord as part of her Marine detachment. Not sure there were a lot of those.
Post #5 photo shows American Defense Medal as well as American Campaign Medal. Since I did not understand the difference between them I looked it up.

The American Defense Medal - WW II (ADSM) is granted to any military personnel who served between September 8, 1939 and December 6, 1941. It is necessary for U.S. Army personnel to actively serve for at least one year during the time period noted above. As for U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, and U.S. Marine Corps members, they are granted the ADSM for any length of active service during the eligible time frame.

a. The American Campaign Medal was awarded to personnel for service within the American Theater between 7 December 1941 and 2 March 1946 under any of the following conditions.
(1) On permanent assignment outside the continental limits of the United States.
(2) Permanently assigned as a member of a crew of a vessel sailing ocean waters for a period of 30 days or 60 nonconsecutive days.
(3) Permanently assigned as a member of an operating crew of an airplane actually making regular and frequent flights over ocean waters for a period of 30 days.
(4) Outside the continental limits of the United States in a passenger status or on temporary duty for 30 consecutive days or 60 days not consecutive.
(5) In active combat against the enemy and was awarded a combat decoration or furnished a certificate by the commanding general of a corps, higher unit, or independent force that he actually participated in combat.
(6) Within the continental limits of the United States for an aggregate period of one year.
b. The eastern boundary of the American Theater is from the North Pole, south along the 75[SUP]th[/SUP] meridian west longitude to the 77[SUP]th[/SUP] parallel north latitude, then southeast through Davis Strait to the intersection of the 40[SUP]th[/SUP]parallel north latitude and the 35[SUP]th[/SUP] meridian west longitude, then south along the meridian to the 10[SUP]th[/SUP] parallel north latitude, then southeast to the intersection of the Equator and the 20[SUP]th[/SUP] meridian west longitude, then south along the 20[SUP]th[/SUP] meridian west longitude to the South Pole. The western boundary is from the North Pole, south along the 141[SUP]st[/SUP] meridian west longitude to the east boundary of Alaska, then south and southeast along the Alaska boundary to the Pacific Ocean, then south along the 130[SUP]th[/SUP] meridian to its intersection with the 30[SUP]th[/SUP]parallel north latitude, then southeast to the intersection of the Equator and the 100[SUP]th[/SUP] meridian west longitude to the South Pole. The American Theater included North America (excluding Alaska) and South America.

One bronze service star is authorized for wear on the American Campaign Medal to denote participation in the antisubmarine campaign. The individual must have been assigned or attached to, and present for duty with, a unit credited with the campaign.
 

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Post #5 photo shows American Defense Medal as well as American Campaign Medal. Since I did not understand the difference between them I looked it up.

The American Defense Medal - WW II (ADSM) is granted to any military personnel who served between September 8, 1939 and December 6, 1941. It is necessary for U.S. Army personnel to actively serve for at least one year during the time period noted above. As for U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, and U.S. Marine Corps members, they are granted the ADSM for any length of active service during the eligible time frame.

a. The American Campaign Medal was awarded to personnel for service within the American Theater between 7 December 1941 and 2 March 1946 under any of the following conditions.
(1) On permanent assignment outside the continental limits of the United States.
(2) Permanently assigned as a member of a crew of a vessel sailing ocean waters for a period of 30 days or 60 nonconsecutive days.
(3) Permanently assigned as a member of an operating crew of an airplane actually making regular and frequent flights over ocean waters for a period of 30 days.
(4) Outside the continental limits of the United States in a passenger status or on temporary duty for 30 consecutive days or 60 days not consecutive.
(5) In active combat against the enemy and was awarded a combat decoration or furnished a certificate by the commanding general of a corps, higher unit, or independent force that he actually participated in combat.
(6) Within the continental limits of the United States for an aggregate period of one year.
b. The eastern boundary of the American Theater is from the North Pole, south along the 75[SUP]th[/SUP] meridian west longitude to the 77[SUP]th[/SUP] parallel north latitude, then southeast through Davis Strait to the intersection of the 40[SUP]th[/SUP]parallel north latitude and the 35[SUP]th[/SUP] meridian west longitude, then south along the meridian to the 10[SUP]th[/SUP] parallel north latitude, then southeast to the intersection of the Equator and the 20[SUP]th[/SUP] meridian west longitude, then south along the 20[SUP]th[/SUP] meridian west longitude to the South Pole. The western boundary is from the North Pole, south along the 141[SUP]st[/SUP] meridian west longitude to the east boundary of Alaska, then south and southeast along the Alaska boundary to the Pacific Ocean, then south along the 130[SUP]th[/SUP] meridian to its intersection with the 30[SUP]th[/SUP]parallel north latitude, then southeast to the intersection of the Equator and the 100[SUP]th[/SUP] meridian west longitude to the South Pole. The American Theater included North America (excluding Alaska) and South America.

One bronze service star is authorized for wear on the American Campaign Medal to denote participation in the antisubmarine campaign. The individual must have been assigned or attached to, and present for duty with, a unit credited with the campaign.
Dad had American Campaign Medal (Stateside USN 1942-1945); Asiatic Pacific Campaign Medal (Okinawa in 1945); WWII Victory Medal. He never had any of them issued until got some help from my US Rep (Charley Wilson at the time). He did have his Honorable Discharge pin. And the embroidered patch, which he got at out-processing center at Dickinson or Hitchcock - wherever the blimp base was.

Oh - the American Dense medal is often called, in my experience, the "Pre-Pearl Harbor" Medal.
 
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