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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
<<JUST BELOW THE AFRICAN LEAF PATTERN SWORD KNIFE>>
Found this at a local gun (pawn) shop a while ago and it sat in the corner waiting for me to identify it. I've been a bad gun-daddy as I have been unable to figure it out. If someone cut it down from an original rifle, it was very well done and a very long time ago. I never had any ammo, and the shop didn't know what it chambered, so... looks about 30 cal/8mm. Military cartouche is crisp, and overall condition is pretty nice for 107 years old. All in all, I'm happy to have it on my wall. I'm open to any comments about it, can provide better pictures if you tell me what you want to see, and no, I'm not interested in parting with my little guy anytime soon (unless the right trade comes along, you all know how it goes).
Thanks in advance and hope you like what you see.
 

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Looks like a nicer than average KNIL M-95 carbine. Originally in 6.5mm Dutch, the Indonesians converted many to .303 British after WWII. I have one, still in 6.5mm, and use .303 British as the parent case for my reloading efforts. Clips are the same for either cartridge.

Sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I screwed up, it's 6.5mm. I never checked (or noted different) what the seller told me. A .303 rim fits the bolt head beautifully, and a 6.5mm Carcano bullet (original round point) fit in the muzzle almost to the end of the ogive. Now to figure out how to make ammo for it. I always thought the cartouche indicated an Austrian unit, never thought Dutch. Thank you.
 

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Dutch 6,5x53R ammo making.

Dear Navy Ogre,
The 6,5ZDutch ammo is one of the easiest reform jobs around ( Nonte used it as an example of Case Forming in his Book in 1967 "Home Guide to cartridge Conversions.

My system is a bit longer than Nonte's system, but reduces the chances of case loss from accidents in forming.

Take Winchester or Remington .303 British cases, boxer primed.

Run into a .308 FLS die to set the shoulder back, just enough to match a real 6,5mm Dutch case ( or a 7mm-08 die is just as good)

Then run into a 6,5x53R die, Full length size. CH4D makes this calibre, as does Lee and RCBS

Then trim to 53mm OAL.

Deburr, Load with Primer, about 30 grains of 3031 or 4895 or similar, and a 156 grain RN .264 diameter Bullet.

Get some 5 shot Dutch Mannlicher charger clips ( gun is a single shot without them)

Fill the clip, insert into magazine untill clip latch engages, Load first round, and
"Bang" Bullseye.

Your Carbine is a very nice example of a Steyr-made Dutch Cavalry Carbine ( no bayo Band, but some used a socket type spike bayonet.

Regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics
 

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Although this carbine looks like the early cavalry carbines used by the Dutch European Army, it is actually a Dutch colonial carbine used by the Royal East Indies Army (the KNIL) in what is now Indonesia. Specifically, it is the KNIL police carbine, refered to in Dutch as the "Karabijn M.95 marechausee", or "Marechausee Carbine Model 95". "Marechausee" is a Dutch word meaning military police. 28,000 of these were manufactured at Steyr and Hembrug, making it the most widely produced of all Dutch colonial carbines. This was also the most popular ex-Dutch carbine for Indonesians to convert to .303 British. In the process, they almost always seem to have added a flash supressor.

The unit mark, "Res. Min." is interesting. The "Res" stands for the Dutch phrase "reservekorps oud-militairen". The "Min" stands for a location in Indonesia, but the unit mark list in my KNIL book does not list it specifically. (See "Nederlandse Vuurwapens, KNIL en Militarire Luchtvaart, 1897-1942" by Drs. de Vries and Martens.)
Regards,
John
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Gentlemen,
Thank you ever so much. In less than 24 hours I've learned the calibre, loading data, and a good history of a wonderful little carbine. I had always thought it was too good to be a cut-down, and I am even more amazed, considering the area of the world where it saw service, at what wonderful condition it remains all these years later. I we could only hear the stories it could tell. I'll have to cast about for all the ingredients, but will give a range report after I get some ammo built up.
Thank you again.
Mike
 
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