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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Thought I would pass this one on to the brethren here in the group here as these are seldom seen anymore.
This is an example of the Canadian UNIVERSAL SCREW as used on some arms chests such as the No.4 (T) sniper, Bren gun, the NO.7 rifle and others.
The screw is a combination of the Canadian Robertson screw adapted in Canada in 1907 with the addition of a slot in the head so a normal slotted screw driver could be used as Canada was the only country in the world using the Robertson screw.
When chests of arms were sent to the UK they could not open them as they did not have the proper tools.
Canada obliged by adding in the slot in the screw head.
There are 4 sizes of Robertson screws used in Canada and Robertson screws are the dominate screw head in Canada and have been for many years. They are starting to be used to some extent in the USA now.
These screws would be in universal use if not for Henry Ford.
Ford was offered the rights to them but Ford and Robertson could not some to an agreement.
The screws do not fall off the head of the screwdriver and they really sped up Canadian WW 2 production.
I make repro No.15, Thompson and MP40 chests and now I have to order slotted screws in as a special order in Canada.
For some museum repair projects, I manufacture them by slotting a Robertson wood screw.
Eye Automotive tire Helmet Wood Automotive wheel system


Eye Automotive tire Helmet Wood Automotive wheel system
 

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On second thought, though, look how the square drive does not always "clock" consistently on the slots? That seems a bit "off"?!?

Oh...I see it now...it was never intended to be "clocked"...the Robertson head was the prime expedient and the slots were cut for those that hadn't accepted its advantages!
 

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1915? Took quite a while before they caught on in the Lower 48. Saw them come into use on automobiles in the late 70’s.
We transitioned from Phillips to Pozi-Drive and then to Robeson (common spelling down here along with Robertson)
A few years later the Torx came into use and in some odd sizes such as T-27 etc.
Snap-On made a bit of money selling tools before anyone else could. Inside info conspiracy? Most of us in the trades still believe so.

Many of the “square drive” fasteners now also have the corners relieved for Phillips drivers.
 

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1915? Took quite a while before they caught on in the Lower 48. Saw them come into use on automobiles in the late 70’s.
We transitioned from Phillips to Pozi-Drive and then to Robeson (common spelling down here along with Robertson)
A few years later the Torx came into use and in some odd sizes such as T-27 etc.
Snap-On made a bit of money selling tools before anyone else could. Inside info conspiracy? Most of us in the trades still believe so.

Many of the “square drive” fasteners now also have the corners relieved for Phillips drivers.

PHILLIPS??? Yuck! Phooey! Fine for toasters or TV's and the like, but useless outdoors or on mechanical equipment where things seize up. Flimsy garbage.

Although I'm very partial to our Robertson system, I have to be fair and admit that the Torx is really the best of the bunch, even if you do need a whole set of drivers to work with them. But our "square-head" is the next best thing. I couldn't imagine building a deck with slotted screws! Years ago, I was picking up an assortment of socket-head fasteners for a machine we were building, and I asked our bolt supplier who would ever want a slotted anything. He said they were fine for putting on a suit of armour, and they've been obsolete ever since.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Here are the originals ..two on the top and the ones I make that have not been stripped of the cadmium and blackened.
Also there is a display of the 4 sizes of Robertson screw drivers and the No.3 is holding a screw on the tip unaided
Ford missed out on a chance to speed his production line up immensely, but that was Henry Ford.
If not his idea not worth shXt
I had to change the date on the Robertson screw from 1915 to the correct date of 1907.😔
 

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the Torx is really the best of the bunch, even if you do need a whole set of drivers to work with them. But our "square-head" is the next best thing. I couldn't imagine building a deck with slotted screws!

Just occurred to me, we need an automotive forum on here.

I couldnt imagine building a deck with anything other than good ole fashion hammer and nails.
 

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Just occurred to me, we need an automotive forum on here.

I couldnt imagine building a deck with anything other than good ole fashion hammer and nails.
Hammer and nails? Sounds to me what you're looking for is a horse-and-buggy forum, not an automotive one.... 😁
 
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