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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thanks to Gunboards, I managed to come across a March 1960-dated Seneca Green Nylon 66.

Despite all the warnings against disassembling these rifles, I wanted to peek inside to be sure everything was okay and clean it up a little. Instead, I found this:



Does anyone out there know of a product or method for a permanent repair?

Google offered a mix of suggestions:

"Weld" in cable ties
http://www.ehow.com/how_4822270_repair-plastic-radiators.html

JB Water Weld
http://www.instructables.com/answers/How-To-Repair-A-Car-Radiator-Leak-In-The-Plastic-A/

Marine-Tex
http://www.nylonrifles.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=439


Emergency Tape (obviously a bad idea for this repair)
http://www.duluthtrading.com/search/searchresults/42054.aspx?feature=&kw=tape
 

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The problem is, the stock is made of nylon, and nylon is difficult to glue or get anything to adhere to it. Most glues will simply peel right off.
The best option is a solvent type cement that actually dissolves the plastic and "welds" it back together.

What I'd do is a Google search for plastic glues to look for one of the hard-to-find specialty glues that are made for these types of plastics.
Again, you want a glue that specifically made to glue nylon. These are often a two-part system in which the first part is a special primer or activator, and the second the actual glue.

Honestly, once cracked the Remington nylon stock is almost always non-repairable.
 

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You need something as dfariswheel says that will actually melt the nylon material and then bond the two surfaces back together.

You can try good old Super Glue. Just a dot on a hidden surface and push it around a bit with the point of a pin will show if it is disolving the nylon stock material or not. It's probably been tried already and doesn't work or we'd be hearing rave reviews about it,,but it's a thought.
You might also try common acetone. It will disolve alot of plastics and some nylon. It evaporates quickly but in a crack it will migrate in and hold there perfectly. If it does melt the stock material, it should do a good clean job of welding it back together with a little bit of pressure on the joint I would think. If it doesn't work,,it'll just clean things up for you.

Other than that, I can't think of anything common to do the job. The usual glues and epoxys are worthless on those stocks. Short of melting it back together with heat(!), a specialty glue/solvent is probably the only other alternative if the above doesn't work.
 

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Have you fired it yet? It looks to be mostly on the outside and is not where it would affect the bolt. If it doesn't interfere w/function, I wouldn't worry about it. The receiver cover will keep everything together when you have it screwed on.
 

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Repairing nylon 66 is tough. However it has been done successfully.

Best options is to weld the area back up using the original stock as filler. The melting point of nylon 66 is 380-400 deg F. You can use a air heat gun for best results.

Start off by beveling the edges and cleaning them by either media-blasting them or light sanding. Then use Acetone to clean before welding.

You can also try Devcon II (not the Devcon 2 ton). It is designed for Nylon.

You can get additional pointers by googling HK SL-8 conversions to G36 where the rear end is replaced.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Repairing nylon 66 is tough. However it has been done successfully.

You can also try Devcon II (not the Devcon 2 ton). It is designed for Nylon.

Good luck.
Thanks for the help so far.

There are several listings for Devcon "Plastic Welder" with different part numbers, do you know the one I should use? I am getting lots of hits for Devcon 2-ton but none for Devcon-II for sale.

As for welding, well, the idea of a heat gun scares the bejeezus out of me since I don't have anyplace I could use it (except outside where the neighbors can see me and even then its sub-optimal). Still interested in the soldering iron idea if I knew it would work. I found a post where someone said they tried and it broke.
 

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This is the best I could find for nylon. Not sure it'll work unless you can get at the surfaces to be mated as its not really a glue but a surface prep, for their "Tech Bond" glue that lets it stick to nylon. I've used a plastic epoxy with success but only where i've glopped a lot around the outside for the epoxy to hold it together, not something you can do with your 66.

http://www.tech-bond.net/gluethepoly_snylonetal.html

I've use Marine-Tex. I doubt it'll work on nylon. Ditto JB Water-Weld, a similar epoxy putty.
 

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I once attmepted to repair a Nylon66 that was broken in the same area. I used cable ties and a soldering iron and was very careful to get the filler rod (cable ties) mixed in really well with the nylon of the stock. I would heat and melt the nylon and then press in the filler. When I had it all done, I very carefully filed off the excess and put the gun back together. First shot and it came apart as the stock is actually the receiver and does take all the recoil forces of the bolt. The owner of the rifle did not care what it looked so I ended up drilling through the sheet metal receiver cover on either side of the crack and tapping the nylon and using short button head screws. That worked just fine but did nothing for the collectablility of the rifle. You may have better luck than I however and it is worth a try. Maybe some butterfly shaped inlays woudl be strong enough to tie both pieces together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Though you won't fully believe until you try it, Tech-Bond's Plastic Prep Solution, an adhesion promoter, will work quite well on the surface of nylon and will allow any advanced CA to "work". To find out more information visit www.tech-bond.net.
I've been trading emails with the Tech-Bond person, and it looks like this will be the route I take.

They offered to send me some product on the condition I take pictures of the before and after process (and probably some during). Thats a small favor to ask and it could potentially get it back up and running.

BTW, the hole is for the sear pin
 

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I've been trading emails with the Tech-Bond person, and it looks like this will be the route I take.

They offered to send me some product on the condition I take pictures of the before and after process (and probably some during). Thats a small favor to ask and it could potentially get it back up and running.

BTW, the hole is for the sear pin
phenol acid this info is right out of the remington fac. repair manual hope that helps as i have nor tryed it
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
I have the Tech-bond stuff, I've flushed the crack with acetone, the work will start soon!

Didn't know about Carbolic Acid (aka pheol acid) but I would like to think that in the 50 years since the introduction of these rifles *someone* has developed a better way to fix cracks instead of melting them back together.

UPDATE: With my housemate snapping photos, I performed with work with Tech-Bond following the email instructions. Once I overcame my fear of the chemicals it was fairly straightforward. My only complaint is I am not 100% sure the glue filled the crack, and I didn't want to risk using dental floss to work it in (now if I had an old feeler gauge I could cut up, that might have worked). I prefer the glue be too thick as opposed to too watery and run everyhere.

It set up nicely and I'll start putting the Nylon 66 back together for a range trip. Once I get my main computer rebuilt, I'll post the pics and describe the work.
 

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Fushi
NO
sorry, but the best 'repair' is to physically REJOIN the plastic, it can be done chemically, which is somewhat perfered to heat, or heat (esp. depending on plastic, the less reactive the plastic (like Polyethylene, which is a major bitch to repair) the less chemical is an option and you are stuck (if a thermal plastic) with rewelding, which is a chemical repair, however this depletes the free radical/oxidation protection, and leaves stresses in the join
 

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I had a cracked fore-end and after doing some research I chose to try this stuff; http://www.surehold.com/adhesives/7-plastic-surgery-302.html

Called around and found the local True-Value hardware store had it on the shelf so I went over and got some. Just did the application and it *seems* to be holding quite well.........feels like a unitized fore-end again. Time will tell but since it actually does say that it works on *nylon* I feel pretty confident that it will hold up.....YMMV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·

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Heat the part before applying those, they work ALOT better warm but then you have stress issues, Ultrasonics are also an option,,, if you happen to have an ultrasonic plastic welding machine
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Heat the part before applying those, they work ALOT better warm but then you have stress issues, Ultrasonics are also an option,,, if you happen to have an ultrasonic plastic welding machine
I heard of companies that use ultrasonic welding to re-seal toner cartridges. Hmmm, that sounds like an idea.
 
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