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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

Is there any method to restore erased numbers and marked proofs on the gun frame, and engrave back with a stamp or anything else?
 

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Do you mean like adding fake numbers so a gun is all-matching? Sure, fraudsters try it all the time. A guy even sells stencils for engraving flaming bomb and U.S. marks.
 

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The usual methods of restoring the original marks on guns are to have them refreshed by a hand engraver, or having them laser deepened.

Since you can't exactly match original stamps, attempting to hand stamp them with steel stamp sets is ugly and looks like a botch job.

There are restoration services who offer hand engraving or laser etching of original stamps, but prices can be high.
 

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A very bad idea.
 
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Do you mean like adding fake numbers so a gun is all-matching? Sure, fraudsters try it all the time. A guy even sells stencils for engraving flaming bomb and U.S. marks.
No, i don't want add fake marks, just restoring the original marks and proofs.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The usual methods of restoring the original marks on guns are to have them refreshed by a hand engraver, or having them laser deepened.

Since you can't exactly match original stamps, attempting to hand stamp them with steel stamp sets is ugly and looks like a botch job.

There are restoration services who offer hand engraving or laser etching of original stamps, but prices can be high.
I can't use a laser, because it's an old gun. I am planning to use a Dremel engraver.
 

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Id say a Dremel would be an extremely bad idea......of the "I wish I hadnt done that" kind......I see no reason why any reasonably skilful person couldnt get a few engravers tools together ,and hand engrave the marks,especially if a witness mark was still evident......Stamps can be overdone undectably ,with experience.......general rule is to practice a bit until the result is acceptable,then work on your gun.
 

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Original marks are added back regularly by companies like Turnbull, and they are considered high dollar restorations.

What is the difference then?

I have met Doug numerous times, our paths have crossed on several occasions. I have not met a person yet that considers his companies work to be Fakes... ? And these guns demand a premium, sometimes above and beyond the cost of an original.
 

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It is interesting how the definition and acceptability of restorations varies among collectors of different arms. In general collectors of WWl and WWll German long arms are against any form of marking restoration, and I do mean the restoration of original marks, not adding something to indicate the gun is something it never really was. But if you get into the Luger collecting world, in general, there are always exceptions, professional restorations are accepted, even valued. Rough specimens of rare variations will sometimes be given a complete restoration, including removing of light pitting, refreshing original markings and then a complete or partial reblue. And if it is acknowledged and the work is preformed by a respected source, the item will increase in value.
 

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There is a big difference in restoration and merely refinished/ faked firearms.

If a collectable firearm is in a desirable form but maybe neglected or altered it can be a candidate for restoration to include freshening of its original markings .
But that is always a last resort.
Years ago I purchased a how to VHS from Doug Turnbull and one of the first things they do is take "ink pulls" of all markings prior to any work being done.
This helps the engraver to duplicate any lightened marks.

Adding markings that were not there is not very desirable ,unless were talking engraving or enlays to upgrade status to deluxe.

Most restoration specialists will work around markings to save them if at all possible.

I've worked with Turnbull on a rifle restoration ,generally he apply a D/T in an area so as not to be confused with original rifles.

There are firearms that can not be found in high condition ,hence the desire by some collectors to choose correct restorations.
 

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The problem with a great many restorations is that they loose the 'restoration' tag after being out on the market for a while. Then they are simply an excellent condition original ' GeeWhiz will ya Look at that Gun,, Wow!!'
The ones that know anything or know the difference hold tongue in cheek so as not to upset the money cart.

If you really believe that all these 'Highly Respected' restorations are marked as such, were sold as such, and marketed with the expressed claim as being done so to 'save a very rare firearm from the dustbin of history',,you are sadly mistaken.

There's more redone, upgraded, duplicated, changed ser#, changed model guns out there than than you could ever imagine. Many are in publications as originals. Along with repro boxes, paperwork and factory invoices.
People don't know any better
 
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