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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
seeking ballpark value on a Mauser rifle

no pics available, handled it for a couple minutes, what I know:

presumptive GI bringback, but no duffle cut, no import marks, no sling, bayo, etc.

dated: 1940

maker code: 237

serial 6xx, matching numbers as far as I can tell

wood: good or better condition

metal finish: good or better condition

bore: I can see rifling, but it appears rounded and the bore is very dirty, may have been shot w/ corrosive ammo and not cleaned properly. I was not able to run patches down the bore.

a good buy at $700 ?
 

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You realy need pics, good pics to get an acurate assesment ... but if correct, #'s matching and not sanded that is give or take about 1/2 the average price I have seen lately, and I would jump on it. If it has issues ( sanded , renumbered, wrong parts) it would be a costly mistake. Again without good pics or knowledge????
 

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There is no way to speak to the value without seeing some pics. There are just too many details to be considered that effect value. For instance the wood. Being in good condition is not enough description. If original and not sanded or refinished or over varnished that is one thing. Sanded and refinished, but in good condition is an entire different can of worms, and can cut value from 25 -75%. The $700 figure may be real cheap, or way too much just depending on condition. Condition is an important factor in value, and can't be determined from the details you have provided.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm not an expert on Mauser wood, but comparing it to pics I've seen here and elsewhere, and the Russian captures I've handled, I'd say original and not sanded and refinished. It has a few dings, but nothing serious. I'll take another look Monday. Is there a FAQ/checklist here for an "originality test"? Thanks.
 

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...Is there a FAQ/checklist here for an "originality test"? Thanks.
Sadly no. Such a work would be monumental in scope. But here are a few hints af what to look for. On the rifle in question all the parts should be numbered. If you find a couple mismatched parts, that is a warning sign, but not always a deal breaker... Just a warning to look more carefully. For instance it is common to see earlier rifles with mismatched safeties, as they were a weak spot and broke often. So finding a mismatched safety is common, but if the barrel bands don't match, that is more of a sign that perhaps the rifle was sporterized and then restored to military trim. The bottom of the stock should be numbered to match the rifle. This sometimes will be hard to see. The right side of the stock should have markings. If you can't find these, that is a sign of "wood work". Look around the area where the stock is cut out for the bolt handle. The edges of this should be sharp, if they are rounded that is a common sign of "wood work". Again a few quick pics would be the best way to go. It also might be telling if you consider the seller. Is this in a shop? From a neighbor? At a show? If for instance the rifle is out of some neighbor's attic, then chances are better that it is original. If the rifle is being offered by some guy at a gunshow... That is a bit more of a risk. These are just a few general things to look at. They are guidlines, and not 100% hard and fast rules. OH... also Look close at the barrel out near the bayo lug. Early imports had tiny import marks there, and many newer collectors do not realize they are there. If there are import marks, this could tell a lot about the rifle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the info. Armed w/ a printout, I will take a closer look Monday. It's in a shop. It came in w/ a P08 (also 1940 and matching ) and a Fox shotgun. The indications are all 3 come from from a vets' estate.
 

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i got a k98 thats rifling looked good but was dirty as hell. after running a patch or two it revealed that it was mirror and in exellent shape. make shure the crown is visible at the tip so you know its snug. 700 is nothing for something that matches, put some picks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
now with pics and more details

well, here's my attempt at pics, only half of them were clear enough to bother uploading


no import marks up by the bayonet lug

markings:

on barrel, three times WA214

reciever, right side, 3 times WA214

bolt release WA214

extractor WA280

bolt and safety matching #, the collar is also, but it appears to have been rusted/pitted and reblued, the blueing does not match that of the rest of the bolt or the reciever, it's dull and the rest of the metal is a brighter blue

below the sight base, on the right side S/42G K 167 (twice, each inside a large horizontal "H")

on the stock, centered below the pistol grip, S/N 606, WA280 below, below that, the number 4 in a hexagon It was quite faint, not like the cartouche on a 1903 I handled. Are k98 cartouches not as clear as US markings?

on the stock, left side, in the cutout for the rear sling attachment, the number 11 in a hexagon

the lower trigger guard screw has matching S/N, the upper is blank


the sight base: 67 WA359 88

sight leaf: 41 "twice WA 359" 90

It was sugggested by a neutral third party that this is a later war German refurb, is this plausible ?

The magazine follower shows virtually no wear. I noticed it because years ago I fired a refurbed Broomhandle mauser with a newly refinished follower. After the first 10 rounds, the last round stripped from the mag left a very noticeable drag mark on the follower.
 

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It was sugggested by a neutral third party that this is a later war German refurb, is this plausible ?
German reworks/repair is a deep subject, and to keep things simple for now, let me just say that this rifle is NOT any kind of war time refurb. Early or late.

The obvious thing here is that the stock has been heavily sanded. The closeness of the recoil lug to the surface, is a give away. The lack of markings on the right side is also a warning. I also suspect it is not a WW2 German stock as well. The hexagons with numbers are nothing I would expect on a war time rifle. (I am off hand thinking more like some south american contract rifle???) So if the stock is bad, you have to ask, what else was done to it? The metal is a bit hard to get a handle on from the pics, but your suspicion about some parts being reblued, and the tiny pits showing on the right side of the reciever lead me to think the metal has been reblued. That all said, better pics might tell a different story, but my money is on this being a restored sporter. It may be OK (with a nice bore) as a shooter for $300 but I just don't see it as a $700 rifle, and certainly nothing to buy as an investment.
 

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