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I have had no luck with denatured alcohol on my Norg stocks. And since it's not shellac, the duct tape method was useless as well. They used a tough varnish on those stocks and I fear that the feasible way to remove that varnish would consist of using chemical strippers or maybe a strong lacquer thinner.... And I refuse to use those methods on such beautiful stocks. Chemical strippers damage wood, period. Many will say they don't, but they do. Even the citristrip which people use and many times praise, is advertised as "safer for wood" then other products. Notice that it doesn't say "safe" for wood. It dries out the wood's fibers, but from what I have researched... It is probably your best bet if you will try the chemical stripping route. I personally have learned to enjoy my Norg stocks how they are in their "original" form.
 

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Best to just leave it as is, to get that varnish off you would need paint stripper.

If your going to do it use Citristrip followed by a damp cloth (H2O) to remove any of the stripper, let dry then follow up with Howard feed and Wax.
I've used this method on a Collector Grade K43 with Excellent results.

HDH.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Stan61 - your blonde stock that you posted is almost identical looking to mine.
I got mine approximately five years ago from Mario off of ebay and it is a good looking with nice markings and cartouches.
Think I will take everyone's good advice and leave it alone! I was just hoping that there was a way to remove it without damaging the wood.
Thanks for all of the postings on this topic!
PS - the incorrect stock (that I replaced with the Norway stock) that was on my rifle was a pre-war commercial mauser K98 stock. It still has traces of original varnish in less handled areas. I keep looking for the rifle (that has not been drilled & tapped) to go with my pre-war stock set.
 

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Brake cleaner quickly followed up by a damp cloth has worked for me. I have used it to also clean stock, then rub it down with one shot of BLO. Purists might not like this method, but when properly done, it gets oil, grease, grime, and discoloration off of the wood, dulls down wood, which can be revived with the BLO.
 

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Best to just leave it as is, to get that varnish off you would need paint stripper.

If your going to do it use Citristrip followed by a damp cloth (H2O) to remove any of the stripper, let dry then follow up with Howard feed and Wax.
I've used this method on a Collector Grade K43 with Excellent results.

HDH.

+1 this
 

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Oh man.... I would strongly recommend against the advice from post #10 as is an easy way to ruin a good and collectible stock. The harsh corrosive solvents in brake cleaner are about as damaging to wood as oven cleaner..... And then folks wonder why their stocks end up turning a green hue color or end up cracking in time. Leave the brake cleaner to brakes. The available BLO of today is not recommended either as it is nowhere close to what the Germans used in k98k production. The BLO of today (modern commercial easily available) is totally different then classic WW2 era BLO. In today's time it is processed with heavy petrochemical driers which simulate the desired oxidation and fast drying time, but in the process, makes the wood darker with over time, doesn't penetrate into the wood as it should and leads to the biggest problem... it gums up and looks glossy. Any k98k collector worth his salt can tell if a stock has been treated with modern BLO....
 

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Oh man.... I would strongly recommend against the advice from post #10 as is an easy way to ruin a good and collectible stock. The harsh corrosive solvents in brake cleaner are about as damaging to wood as oven cleaner..... And then folks wonder why their stocks end up turning a green hue color or end up cracking in time. Leave the brake cleaner to brakes. The available BLO of today is not recommended either as it is nowhere close to what the Germans used in k98k production. The BLO of today (modern commercial easily available) is totally different then classic WW2 era BLO. In today's time it is processed with heavy petrochemical driers which simulate the desired oxidation and fast drying time, but in the process, makes the wood darker with over time, doesn't penetrate into the wood as it should and leads to the biggest problem... it gums up and looks glossy. Any k98k collector worth his salt can tell if a stock has been treated with modern BLO....

+1 same here.. avoid both. Like i said HDH is correct with his suggestion.
 

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Oh man.... I would strongly recommend against the advice from post #10 as is an easy way to ruin a good and collectible stock. The harsh corrosive solvents in brake cleaner are about as damaging to wood as oven cleaner..... And then folks wonder why their stocks end up turning a green hue color or end up cracking in time. Leave the brake cleaner to brakes. The available BLO of today is not recommended either as it is nowhere close to what the Germans used in k98k production. The BLO of today (modern commercial easily available) is totally different then classic WW2 era BLO. In today's time it is processed with heavy petrochemical driers which simulate the desired oxidation and fast drying time, but in the process, makes the wood darker with over time, doesn't penetrate into the wood as it should and leads to the biggest problem... it gums up and looks glossy. Any k98k collector worth his salt can tell if a stock has been treated with modern BLO....
Yes the BLO sold at Home Depot is garbage and is nothing like what the Germans used, the big problem is what was in the linseed oil that the Germans did use? No one seems to know. The product that I use is Tom's 3 in one Finn Mix (BLO/turpentine/bees wax) This mixture has none of the buildup of standard BLO and is not glossy.

I have also tried pure Tung oil, the only problem I have with that is it takes a loooong time to dry.

http://www.thegunstockdoctor.com/index.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cI4GAWZKZnk

This and Howard Feed & Wax are all I use now for just about all my Military Wood.

Don't use Brake Cleaner on wood, however it's great for cleaning gunk off the metal.

HDH.
 

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+2

Looks like some type of ceremonial Bayonet, what is it Spax? not general issue that for sure.

HDH.
Ceremonial bayonet from my understanding- given to veterans - . It reads “Zur Erinnerung an Meine Dienstzeit” which translates: In Memory of my Time in Service



Its complete with fog and scabbard, still has its red felt in the bayo groove. This one was made by Robert klaas solingen.


My favorite though is this First Pattern Luftwaffe Dagger





 

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Yes the BLO sold at Home Depot is garbage and is nothing like what the Germans used, the big problem is what was in the linseed oil that the Germans did use? No one seems to know. The product that I use is Tom's 3 in one Finn Mix (BLO/turpentine/bees wax) This mixture has none of the buildup of standard BLO and is not glossy.
hansellhd2, I think I will give this product a try as soon as they respond to my email. I asked about the driers that they use if any. Hopefully they just heat it through the oxygen process which will result in the BLO of old times. BLO can be made at home (backyard) from raw linseed oil but it is a time consuming 24 hour heating process that is highly flammable, but at least you will know it doesn't have added petrochemicals and solvents as driers. I will keep you guys updated as I do have a k98k "test stock" to use it on. My cousin has used it on furniture and it has not gummed up, nor is it glossy like the typical commercial garbage. http://www.solventfreepaint.com/cleaned_linseed_oil.htm#linseedoil

Also if I had to guess and this is just speculation, a liquid based lead product was most likely used as the drier agent to produce BLO....
 

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I use acetone (fingernail polish remover). It cleans the stock and removes old unwanted stains and leaves the wood a nice tone with all of the original scars. Then I use one of three oils. Teak, Tung, or other such new oils. The new oils are a mixture of varnish and oil. Read the cans carefully. Teak and Tung and others are now a combination of Varnish and oils. As you clean the stock with Fingernail Polish remover you will see a beautiful texture appear in the stock. Then a coat of Teak or other will bring your rifle back to a beautiful finish. If this is not what you want, use acetone to remove the new finish.
 
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