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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I'm back from holiday in Paris/Normandy. Before the last change in the system I offered to take some pics for people, but can't remember who wanted what. Regardless, I have pics from Utah and Omaha, as well as a lot of photos from Villers Bocage, Wittman's Grave and Teddy Roosevelt Jr. Just PM me with what you want, and I'll send them to your e-mail address (can't post photos from here). BTW, if anyone knows how I can get a new password for the Current Events and Minefield, it would be appreciated.
 

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Send the respective Mods of those boards a PM pw-request. ;)
 

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Pictures

I was there in 2004, (60th) and have 6,000 photos, as well. Many of those as listed above . (not to hijack your thread, though). Let me know what you want to see.
 

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....We don't know each other that well!!!!!

Well to start with more of your avatar.
LOL. I found that wilst surfing one night, and was attracted to it. Just can't help it!!!!



Here's one you don't see every day, at Bovington, UK Tank Museum. I've never seen one anywhere else.
 

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Gold Bullet Member and Noted Curmudgeon
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Maybe it is the angle, but I don't think I recognize it. Not an A7v, Bovington doesn't have one and it doesn't look right anyway. French thing, perhaps?
 

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"Well duh" he says while giving himself a dope-slap. Of course it is - and a second look at teh suspension would have provided the clue. Oh well.
 

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DD Shermans

internal pictures of the framework that supported the canvas. There were vertical rubber inner tubes which were inflated to provide support and additional buoyancy. The free board of these tanks was less than a foot. These were brave men that took to the ocean in these things!!!
 

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Brave to the point of fool-hardy. Like trying to swim an M-113 or M-114 in anything but the very calmest of water (M-59s and M-75s were even worse that way).
 

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There is a chap who goes to Beltring in the UK and he is restoring a Canadian Valentine tank with the DD. Just a wonderful piece of kit and he is getting done on his own, out of his own pocket...
 

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I hope he isn't planning to test-swim it when done. I surely do.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
DiveTom, drop me a PM with your address and I'll send you a disk. I just sent out two yesterday. We don't have the ability to put in attachments in my present locale.
 

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Talking about the Sherman's suspension, My dad worked in the steel industry in PA. He helped make those torsion arm housings before he was drafted in '43.
 

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Of all the various photos I've seen of the DD-Shermans, though few show the canvas fully raised, I had no idea there was a window in the darn thing! Go figure...
Was the window 'standard' issue by June 6th ... or a later modified variation?
Even with some practice at Slapton Sands et al, I can't believe the tank crews had a whole lot of confidence in these.
The funniest of 'Hobart's Funnies' to be sure: 33 tons of steel held afloat by canvas. Yea, right, sure, uh-huh.
JohnB/
 

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My understanding is that the DD Shermans were launched WAY too far out-6,000 to
8,000 yards IIRC, and in seas that were way too rough. They were used as an ocean going vessel when they really should have been used as a river crossing craft. A Great Idea that
Didn't Work.
 

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The current belief, based on weather & wave research, interviews with vets etc. is that the DD's, though launched at a distance, COULD have made it in. They were drifting off from their assigned sectors due to the current and most drivers then focused on a singular landmark they recognized (a steeple, I think) and steered towards it. This placed them somewhat sideways to the waves and the canvas floatation system had not been designed to stand up to stress from that angle. Had they driven straight into the beach and then gone where they were supposed to be, most would ahave made it. One of the vets reported he did just that...and got ashore.
Omaha was the only Beach that experienced such heavy losses that day. The above explanation makes sense.
JohnB/
 
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