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I had one of these Khyber Toks, which I sold to another collector and a Makarov clone which I still have. As to the "Chinese" markings on the op's pistol (or "Soviet") on the Mak I have, it was explained to me that this was done because local end users believe that foreign made guns are better than the locally produced copies so the enterprising gun makers mark the weapons with fake markings that are designed to make it more appealing to the non-English speakers who can recognize the letters even if they can't read them.
(MADE AS CHINA BY NORINCO = must be a superior Chinese made gun!)



On my Makarov clone they even copied the Soviet "diver down" re-work marking.


 

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You know you really hit rock bottom when you (or someone) fakes Chinese guns! Kinda 1/2 serious, what was the motivation in stamping the gun with 'Norinco' ?

As for it being a real chinese gun imported to USA, it would have to predate 1968 GCA that required serial numbers and after the date when the Chinese made up the name Norinco. Was that Bush I? I dont think there is any overlap there, is there?
There was no trade between Red China and the US until 1984. After that all commercial small arms imports from China were legally required to be import stamped.

A handful of the early imports from China, had very faint, internally stamped import marks.
 

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Someone mentioned there was no trade between the US and Red China until 1984. Was that year supposed to be the first for imports of firearms or of trade in general? IIRC, in 1980 the Carter Administration granted most favorable trade status to China.
 

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From what I understand, the 30 Mauser (7.63X25) was the first round developed for the Mauser C96, the first of this family of pistols.
The round served as a basis for and was followed by the Tokarev 7.62X25.
Definitely close but not the same round.
Unless there are visible cracks in the slide, barrel, or frame, they were built to be shot, and if I could find the ammo for it, I would absolutely take the girl out for a run.
Not much more satisfying than an old 30 cal round coming out of a pistol at nearly 1,500FPS, and for the Tokarev family, over 1,600FPS.
 
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A Tokarev that's only proofed for 30 Mauser is a strange way to make a hand-grenade...
not that I'd trust 30 Mauser in it, either.
This is complete nonsense. This is complete internet myth, and you obviously don't know much about "proof pressures".
 

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This is complete nonsense. This is complete internet myth, and you obviously don't know much about "proof pressures".
Yep, I don't. I'm in IT, not metallurgy. I just randomly spout stuff I've seen elsewhere on the Internets. That gets me out of bed in the morning. Sorry to have poorly repeated the rumor I read that the Russians intentionally made 7.62x25 more powerful than the German .30 Mauser could handle. I shall correct my knowledge database forthwith, and shall stay away from that portion of the Internets going forward. Thank you.
 

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I like the 30 Mauser (7.62x25m) and have a few pieces that take it. I have a semi auto PPS 43c pistol in 7.62mm that likes a fairly warm round to function reliably. It's a good shooter. I also have a Yugo M57 pistol in 7.62 mm that likes the same ammo as the PPS 43c and eats it up just fine.

About 20 years ago I bought a Norinco M 213 pistol in 9mm and have fired it only with one or two mags. using my own 9mm ammo. It is in nearly mint condition. I'm sure the Norinco pieces will most likely never be imported again. I intend to keep it in its current near mint condition, sleeping in its new repro holster. I haven't attempted to estimate it's current value but I'm sure in today's crazy market it's worth more today than when I bought it 20+ years ago.
 

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You might not want to keep your pistol stored in a holster, it can retain moisture and rust the gun.
 

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jonny ------ Thanks for your advise. Yes I keep it in a leather repro holster and check it almost every month for any signs of rust or corrosion. A light film of gun oil is applied on its surface every time I examine it. For the twenty + years I've had it there has not been any sign of rust in or on its surfaces from sleeping in its holster. I do appreciate your advice tho.
 

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I have a Chinese made holsters for both the Tokarev and the Makarov. They are lined, not just leather. Not sure if all Chinese holsters are that way. IMO, get a "bore store" for about $10 and you won't have to worry about smearing it with oil every time you take it out.
 

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jaeger ------ I don't "smear" the piece with oil, I only use a lightly oiled cleaning patch and wipe its surfaces when I examine the gun. Besides handling the pistol and very lightly fondling it is fun for me. I guess I'm just strange that way. I like fondling all my little treasures.
 

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Watch out, you'll go blind!
 
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I have a Chinese made holsters for both the Tokarev and the Makarov. They are lined, not just leather. Not sure if all Chinese holsters are that way. IMO, get a "bore store" for about $10 and you won't have to worry about smearing it with oil every time you take it out.
speaking of 'Bore Stores' silicone cases. are they still in business?
 
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