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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Are there any firearms manufacturers producing weapons within the United States whose workers are not unionized?

I know that Colt, Remington, and Winchester are all union shops.

Ruger?
Henry?
Smith & Wesson?
Others?

What about ammo manufacturers? Winchester and Remington (see above) are union shops, but what about CCI and Federal?
 

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I guess as far as I go, I'd rather know which makers are union so I can avoid them. The UAW did their best to shut Colt down for good, the main reason they lost out on the M16a2 contract in the 90s to FN. Pretty hard to bid a govt contract with your line shut down for a year due to a strike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I suppose the question could be sliced either way. Colt, Remington, and Winchester are all on union "do-buy" lists targeted towards "look for the union label" types.
 

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Mainly due to labor problems, Winchester closed it's plant down in 2006. Most of the new guns are made in Utah by Browning, who is owned by a foreign conglomerate. Model 70s are made by FN in SC. Google "Items made in the USA (with non-sweatshop labor)" Ruger makes the list. When I did some checking I found that they were slapped with some fines by OSHA about the last time they had any labor problems. Remington has been bought by the same company that owns Bushmaster in the last few years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks srinde,
I posed this question on this and one other forum. On the other forum I was informed that all Winchester products are now being made in a non-union plant in South Carolina. Ruger is also non-union.
 

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Thanks srinde,
I posed this question on this and one other forum. On the other forum I was informed that all Winchester products are now being made in a non-union plant in South Carolina. Ruger is also non-union.
Good reasons to buy Winchester or Ruger. Unions started out as criminal conspiracies, and as best I can tell, haven't changd since. The main (but hardly only) victims are the poor suckers on the shop floor the union is supposed to be taking care of.
 

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As a former GM employee and member of the United Auto Workers in the 80's, the only surprise that I had from the recent GM bankruptcy was that it took so long to happen. That any company could run itself profitably while being so hag-ridden by a union as GM was by the UAW simply beggars belief!

Unions are an idea whose time has come and gone. Modern managers, if they want to stay competitive, have learned to treat their employees with decency and respect, as that has been proven to improve productivity and make the most money for the company in the long run. Do you think Microsoft or Google would have succeeded if their employees had all joined the SEIU?

I still keep my UAW union card as an object lesson of how NOT to run a company.

The Expert
 

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Could also help you with the current administration. (Since the unions seem to have the inside track.)
 

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Very interesting thread.
I emailed Kel-Tec and they replied that they are non union.
 

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I guess as far as I go, I'd rather know which makers are union so I can avoid them. The UAW did their best to shut Colt down for good, the main reason they lost out on the M16a2 contract in the 90s to FN. Pretty hard to bid a govt contract with your line shut down for a year due to a strike.
From Wikipedia:

In 1986, Colt's workers, members of the United Auto Workers went on strike for higher wages. This strike would ultimately last for four years, and was one of the longest running labor strikes in American history. With replacement workers running production, the quality of Colt's firearms began to slip. Dissatisfied with Colt's production, in 1988 the U.S. military awarded the contract for future M16 production to Fabrique Nationale.

Some criticized Colt's range of handgun products in the late 1980s as out of touch with the demands of the market, and their once-vaunted reputation for quality had suffered during the UAW strike. Colt's stable of double action revolvers and single action pistols were seen as old fashioned by a marketplace that was captivated by the new generation of "wondernines" - high-capacity, 9 mm caliber handguns, as typified by the Glock 17.

Realizing that the future of the company was at stake, labor and management agreed to end the strike in an arrangement that resulted in Colt being sold to a group of private investors, the State of Connecticut, and the UAW itself.

The new Colt first attempted to address some of the demands of the market with the production in 1990 of the Double Eagle, a double action pistol based heavily on the M1911 design which was seen as an attempt to "modernize" the classic Browning design. Colt followed this up in 1992 with the Colt All American 2000, which was unlike any other handgun Colt had produced before.

The Colt All American 2000 was a polymer framed, rotary bolt, 9 mm handgun with a magazine capacity of 15 rounds. It was everything that Colt thought the civilian market wanted in a handgun. Unfortunately, the execution was disastrous. Early models were plagued with inaccuracy and unreliability, and suffered from the poor publicity of having to be recalled. The product launch failed and production of the All American 2000 ended in 1994................



By 1992 Colt was forced to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. The reorganization included a new York investment firm, Zilkha & Co., took over 85% of the company ownership in exchange for an investment that rescued the company. This means the state and UAW took a beating. Tough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
By 1992 Colt was forced to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. The reorganization included a new York investment firm, Zilkha & Co., took over 85% of the company ownership in exchange for an investment that rescued the company. This means the state and UAW took a beating. Tough.
Thanks for the history jjk308, that was interesting and informative.
 

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Does anyone know what companies are now making our military ammo while we are engaged in two wars? I've heard that South Korea and Israel supply large qauntities of small arms ammo. Is this true? I also believe Winchester is now manufacturing fotr the military, maybe has been all along. Has the US military been buying up surplus ammo from private sources, explainingh the recent scarcity and high prices of military surplus ammo? Are there any US arsenals still in existance and producing ammo/weapons? I know there have been foreign takeovers of old US companies, though US plants may be producing, but what happens in a new military emergency (such as an attack on Israel or South Korea)? Where will our supplies come from??
T0
 

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Good reasons to buy Winchester or Ruger. Unions started out as criminal conspiracies, and as best I can tell, haven't changd since. The main (but hardly only) victims are the poor suckers on the shop floor the union is supposed to be taking care of.
I like Rugers, and this gives me another reason to like them. Lots of folks didn't like their support for the AWB though. I still think it was more a case of seeing the writing on the wall and trying to survive economically, so it doesn't bother me much.
 

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I like Rugers, and this gives me another reason to like them. Lots of folks didn't like their support for the AWB though. I still think it was more a case of seeing the writing on the wall and trying to survive economically, so it doesn't bother me much.
That (support for AWB) was pretty much a Bill Ruger, Sr, decision - and Bill ain't running things anymore.
 

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RUGER buys some of its wood from the same place my friend gets his high grade woods. NON UNION FAMILY BUSINESS.
we get a truck of two full each year.
RUGER lost its credit line with this old timer who goes all over the state and keeps tracks of individual trees buying old growth farm trees from families. FOR Win-Rem- MARLIN who buys wood that has a lot white colorless sap wood showing but the pressurized staining covers it well.:confused:
now do you want to do business with these guys?
when Ruger would place large orders for blanks mostly standard grades and order was filled, ready to ship they only wanted half or none at all.
putting the old man in a real bind, having to find a buyer to pay his incurred bills for this work already done. then maybe unpacking stacks to arrange orders to new spec ts. all losses of time and money again.
they have to pay cash on order now last 4 years.
the old wood man said the children had gambled heavily after dad died on stock market.( the first crises) and were hurting for liquid assets at times.
as far as buying union or non-union- i buy what i want - when i want to no regards for politics, unions, nationality, just my unbiased wants.:thumbsup:
years of seeing what big business- politics- unions did to my state, county, country------------ i wont go there.:angry:.
"a deal is a deal" my friend i can't/won't research old guns for CORRECTNESS and see if Colt or Smith was unionized back then or careless about it today!
if i buy an old GUN I DON'T THINK-- RUSSIAN Communist, a French Nationalist, BRITISH Socialist OR AN American Idealist of any party.
a deal is a deal- just try to buy the best at the least price.

but again i don't buy iceberg lettuce or Michelin tires since Vietnam.
this left over from my protest days when i was an American idealist too!:crossfingers:
NOW since we have opened the subject.:sorry:
we all buy from Walmart THAT practices HAS ACTUALLY HELPED TO DISPLACED MANY AMERICAN TEXTILE WORKERS PRODUCTS.
we buy CHEEP NON UNION SLAVE LABORED, UN-FARE TRADE STANDARDS, (COMPARED TO OUR STANDARDS) because the American dollar cant doesn't have high perching value before Clinton rein of sale offs.
LETS START THEIR FIRST.
FIRST BATTLE THE WIFE!:laugh:
BUT GUNS I THINK WE ARE WAY TOO LATE- LOOKING IN MY SAFES <><dk
 

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RUGER buys some of its wood from the same place my friend gets his high grade woods. NON UNION FAMILY BUSINESS.
we get a truck of two full each year.
RUGER lost its credit line with this old timer who goes all over the state and keeps tracks of individual trees buying old growth farm trees from families. FOR Win-Rem- MARLIN who buys wood that has a lot white colorless sap wood showing but the pressurized staining covers it well.:confused:
now do you want to do business with these guys?
when Ruger would place large orders for blanks mostly standard grades and order was filled, ready to ship they only wanted half or none at all.
putting the old man in a real bind, having to find a buyer to pay his incurred bills for this work already done. then maybe unpacking stacks to arrange orders to new spec ts. all losses of time and money again.
they have to pay cash on order now last 4 years.
the old wood man said the children had gambled heavily after dad died on stock market.( the first crises) and were hurting for liquid assets at times.
as far as buying union or non-union- i buy what i want - when i want to no regards for politics, unions, nationality, just my unbiased wants.:thumbsup:
years of seeing what big business- politics- unions did to my state, county, country------------ i wont go there.:angry:.
"a deal is a deal" my friend i can't/won't research old guns for CORRECTNESS and see if Colt or Smith was unionized back then or careless about it today!
if i buy an old GUN I DON'T THINK-- RUSSIAN Communist, a French Nationalist, BRITISH Socialist OR AN American Idealist of any party.
a deal is a deal- just try to buy the best at the least price.

but again i don't buy iceberg lettuce or Michelin tires since Vietnam.
this left over from my protest days when i was an American idealist too!:crossfingers:
NOW since we have opened the subject.:sorry:
we all buy from Walmart THAT practices HAS ACTUALLY HELPED TO DISPLACED MANY AMERICAN TEXTILE WORKERS PRODUCTS.
we buy CHEEP NON UNION SLAVE LABORED, UN-FARE TRADE STANDARDS, (COMPARED TO OUR STANDARDS) because the American dollar cant doesn't have high perching value before Clinton rein of sale offs.
LETS START THEIR FIRST.
FIRST BATTLE THE WIFE!:laugh:
BUT GUNS I THINK WE ARE WAY TOO LATE- LOOKING IN MY SAFES <><dk
I agree, but theres nothing wrong with putting your money into businesses that are on your side. To this day, I refuse to buy Heinz ketchup. ;)
 

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That (support for AWB) was pretty much a Bill Ruger, Sr, decision - and Bill ain't running things anymore.

Right, but it seems to have left a bad taste in alot of people's mouths. Not mine, I grew up on Rugers, and I still like them.
 

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It wasn't a rational business decision, just Bill Ruger's cranky old prejudice against rifles with big, clunky magazines. He just didn't think that any civilian needed more than 10 rounds. It really was just an antiquated survival of the pre WWII military's prejudice against magazines that stuck out of the bottom of a rifle, that resulted in the M1 Garand's 8 round clip.
 
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