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Diamond Bullet Member and the Revered Sir Jim
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William Badders was awarded the Navy Cross for "extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty" during the salvage of USS S-51 in 1926. He was designated a Master Diver and received commendations for his diving work in salvaging USS S-4 in 1928 and the Japanese steamship Kaku Maru in 1932.
Chief Machinist's Mate Badders was awarded the Medal of Honor for heroism during the rescue of survivors of USS Squalus (SS-192) and subsequent salvage of that submarine in 1939.
CITATION:
For extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession as a Diver with the Submarine and Rescue Salvage Unit, U.S.S. Falcon, during the rescue and salvage operations following the sinking of the U.S.S. Squalus. During the rescue operations, Chief Machinist's Mate Badders, made the last extremely hazardous trip of the rescue chamber to attempt to rescue any possible survivors in the flooded after portion of the Squalus.
He was fully aware of the great danger involved in that if he and his assistant became incapacitated, there was no way in which either could be rescued. During the salvage operations, Chief Machinist's Mate Badders made important and difficult dives under the most hazardous conditions. His outstanding performance of duty contributed much to the success of the operations and characterizes conduct far above and beyond the ordinary call of duty. William Badders died on November 23, 1986.

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The Squalus events were nuts, what these guys did. His MOH was as deserved as any from combat, for sure. When you read the books about that and other sub sinkings and you see what these men did, it is really something else.

Here is another non-combat Medal of Honor event, from 1905, the USS Bennington boiler explosion.

 

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Strictly speaking, though the tone of this thread suggest PEACETIME, non-combat actions, to my mind comes the incident below which, though it took place in WW2, the incident itself was non-combat: For those not familiar with the man and the deed, a reading of the article brings new meaning to the word VALOR. It brings tears to my eyes every time I think about it:

 

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Strictly speaking, though the tone of this thread suggest PEACETIME, non-combat actions, to my mind comes the incident below which, though it took place in WW2, the incident itself was non-combat: For those not familiar with the man and the deed, a reading of the article brings new meaning to the word VALOR. It brings tears to my eyes every time I think about it:

During combat operations, so (technically) a combat award. Still, (looking at it from my old JAGC perspective), not sure I would have chopped off on either the MoH or the PH IF I had been giving legal review to the awards. However, expect I'd have considered that MG LeMay had approved it and said "Pluck the rules, the awards are justified" - which they certainly were. Crossing Curtis LeMay was NOT something to be undertaken lightly.

In looking at the consolidated MoH list one time, was struck by the number of peacetime awards made under prior rules (when the MoH was the ONLY award for valorous conduct). And that several were for actions after boiler casualties (like the Bennington award mentioned supra).
 
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