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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Here's some pictures of a No5 I acquired somewhat recently. I've already posted it previously (only really asking about the MkII rear sight on it though I believe), but these pictures are much better. I'm not much of a Lee-Enfield guy (yet), as I am trying to collect WW2 rifles in general. My sub-collection of Enfields is just starting out really.

Honest opinions and any questions about this No5 would be most welcome.
 

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Looks good! Bayonet as you know is not for this rifle. I'm also just starting my Enfield collections. You have one of the harder ones out of the way now start with the Number ones and fours.

James
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Looks good! Bayonet as you know is not for this rifle. I'm also just starting my Enfield collections. You have one of the harder ones out of the way now start with the Number ones and fours.

James
Yeah, the bayonet obviously doesn't fit. It does fit this though! My only other L-E currently...
 

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Can't think of a reason the rear sight isn't original... Certainly the lesser seen model of the two. Your rifle has seen service in India as well. Overall a very nice start for sure, congrats!

Btw, you might consider not laying a cocked rifle on the ground, even though you might know it's empty, all safety training says to treat it as loaded if it is cocked. Too many people get shot by unloaded rifles because they have let their safety standards slip. You can dry fire Lee Enfields to your heart's content. It won't hurt them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Can't think of a reason the rear sight isn't original... Certainly the lesser seen model of the two. Your rifle has seen service in India as well. Overall a very nice start for sure, congrats!

Btw, you might consider not laying a cocked rifle on the ground, even though you might know it's empty, all safety training says to treat it as loaded if it is cocked. Too many people get shot by unloaded rifles because they have let their safety standards slip. You can dry fire Lee Enfields to your heart's content. It won't hurt them.
The "decocking" thing actually goes against American safety doctrine to some degree more so than just leaving it cocked during handling as it's sometimes more dangerous than dry firing depending on the weapon. I can see how it might serve as a visual indicator to letting one know that a rifle's been check empty, but Enfields are in the large minority in my collection and most rifles take more effort to decock (two hands or just actually dry fired even), so I like to be in the habit of handling them all the same.

Are you sure the screw in the stock indicates Indian use? I thought the British also added them sometimes. India might make a lot of since though since the rifle has no British civilian proof marks on it to speak of.
 

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The "decocking" thing actually goes against American safety doctrine to some degree more so than just leaving it cocked during handling as it's sometimes more dangerous than dry firing depending on the weapon. I can see how it might serve as a visual indicator to letting one know that a rifle's been check empty, but Enfields are in the large minority in my collection and most rifles take more effort to decock (two hands or just actually dry fired even), so I like to be in the habit of handling them all the same.

Are you sure the screw in the stock indicates Indian use? I thought the British also added them sometimes. India might omake a lot of since though since the rifle has no British civilian proof marks on it to speak of.
Ok, i'm trying to get my head around the first part of the above, are you saying that dry firing can be dangerous because if you have left a live round in there it could go off & so it would be better to just leave it cocked?
I would have thought that after checking the firearm is unloaded & while pointing it a safe direction dry firing would be the safe option & if you had somehow missed seeing a round still in it a controled discharge would be far better than an uncontroled discharge which could go anywhere.
Pardon me if i'm wrong about this.
 

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I have heard that the screw use was pioneered by the British, but have yet to see one, verified, as only in British service. Would be interesting, though.


Pretty sure that the screw in the fore end was more or less exclusive to the Indians.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Ok, i'm trying to get my head around the first part of the above, are you saying that dry firing can be dangerous because if you have left a live round in there it could go off & so it would be better to just leave it cocked?
I would have thought that after checking the firearm is unloaded & while pointing it a safe direction dry firing would be the safe option & if you had somehow missed seeing a round still in it a controled discharge would be far better than an uncontroled discharge which could go anywhere.
Pardon me if i'm wrong about this.
That's basically my point, but I try to potentially avoid the discharge in a "safe direction" too. If you leave the bolts open almost all of the time, then there's even less chance of a problem happening ever which is what the No5's condition was before and after pictures. Not pulling the trigger also prevents discharge.

For Mosins in particular (most common rifle in my collection), they can and should be checked for a round in the chamber just like everything else, but it is harder to check them because they have recessed chambers and are not controlled fed; opening and closing the bolt may not eject a round stuck in the chamber (among a few other disadvantages). Physical checking with your finger is OK when they are cold, but after firing a lot may be a very bad idea! Visual inspection is your only real option, but humans aren't 100% and the visual inspection may be difficult in low light. So, just leaving the bolts open and the not ever touching the trigger unless a very thorough inspection has taken place or you are actually shooting I think is the best course for them. I do use the safety too, but it's mainly when I know it's been loaded. I then just do this for all weapons that have a similar battery of arms to reduce the potential of thoughtless mistakes.

Now, I have had several Lee-Enfield collectors who do not reside in the US tell me that a bolt action rifle's trigger should be pulled whenever the bolt is closed to "decock" the rifle without fully dry firing it. I can kind of see how this is a good idea if you're watching the chamber as you do it (only really possible in rifle like the L-E), but it is flat out dangerous if there were a round in the chamber which may be easier to miss on another rifle type. I'm not sure if this is what you guys are advising or not, but I totally and completely ignore it as any "safety" advice. The round wouldn't go off at FIRST, but a bump could randomly set it off at a random time! I never do the "decocking" thing unless I've thoroughly checked the rifle several times and am inspecting it's function or something.

Straight up dry firing the rifle is better because you could ensure it's pointed in a safe direction, you're right. I try to avoid dry firing as well (unless rifle is thoroughly checked and I am practicing my trigger control or inspecting function or something), because I don't really see the point (and, as I've noted, checking non L-E rifles is potentially more error prone). IMO, it's better to just have the bolt closed and cocked briefly for pictures or other handling, and to leave the bolt open for storage, transport, and all other times I want to disable the rifle than to ever bother with dry firing it or dangerously "decocking" it.

Opening the bolt of a bolt action rifle totally disables it from accidentally going off, so I treat THAT as my mechanical safety unless I am purposefully loading the rifle to shoot (then I use the safety present on the rifle). For pictures I merely close the bolt after thoroughly checking the chamber and magazine which is, IMO, reasonable for handling away from ammo and in a situation in which I can make a thoughtful, very thorough inspection. Like usual, my finger is my real safety.
 

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Given that the L-E is a cock-on-closing action, there should be no need to have to de-cock them - if you hold the trigger fully rearward as you close the bolt, the sear does not catch the cocking piece, and so the rifle never gets cocked in the first place. This is quite different to dry firing after closing and cocking the bolt.
 

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I'm with Brad on this one, the first 10 pic's show the rifle cocked, safety not applied.
It's got nothing to do with a preference for action open, as this is not the case here, it is just a bad habit that needs to be corrected.
There are three safe ways to show the rifle...;) Either close the bolt, finger on trigger to ease the spring, leave the action open, or remove the bolt.
 
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