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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a NO1 MK3 from atlantic firearms, I think I know what to expect, and they wee just posted however What should i go over once I have it in hand, I have no clue on how to check the headspace for starters. Any help would be great!
 

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I saw those this morning but didn't have time to look.

I missed out on the K98's they got a few weeks ago. They had an "x" on the receiver, which I thought meant they were Russian Captures.. Anyway, sold out within minutes.

Watching thread with interest.
 

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Oh boy...these are RTI guns. Prepare to be disappointed (I can speak from experience).
Things to expect: gouges/cracks in wood, most blued components are either brown patina or worn away completely to "in the white", bugs/seeds/poop everywhere, sewer pipe bore with no rifling, etc.
 

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I will remind forum members that the motto of GunBoards is "By collectors, for collectors". So help a new guy out with your comments. There's enough rain in the world.
-limpetmine/moderator
 

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Brian Dick (BDL Ltd) has received dozens (yes dozens) of these RTI rifles from dissapointed buyers who have found that they have brought an unusable and in some cases unsafe rifle. He has had to rebarrel and rebuild every one he has been sent.
The buyer has paid over the top pricing for 'rubbish' and then had to throw another few $100 at them to make them usable.

IF they are indeed RTI rifles then the suggestion is to 'save your money', - in fact, if the prices are typical of the RTI prices you can buy a 'good +' rifle for the same money as you are paying for a tomato stake.
 

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Thinking I looked at a very expensive CLLE or CLLM they had listed and it looked pretty darn rough. Didn’t buy it. I would likely assume that it was the nicest example they had to photo to use in their description. Hope the op’s rifle is a decent one. Fingers crossed.
 

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Give it a good lookover and go SLOW...really go over every aspect of the rifle and use COMMON SENSE.

There is a good chance that the rifle will benefit from a judicious cleaning but go slow on this too. Ask questions, here.

Read up on the headspace issue....it's technical but not that daunting...

RIFLECHAIR'S LOUNGE: Evaluating Headspace - The Lee Enfield Rifle

Hopefully your rifle will be OK. I've seen some really simple evaluation techniques but NOBODY wants to treat this issue lightly.
 

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Headspace, all the info.
Okie is no longer in existence, It was a one man band & he passed, but this is excellent instructions starting from scratch.
The MEASUREMENT is critical, the name just a guide. Make sure you get the correct standards there are two & SAAMI is NOT the best choice.
When using very light finger pressure ONLY, don't go slamming or forcing the bolt.
.303 Enfield Gauges (Mil spec)
Headspace is measured in different ways on different calibers. For a rimmed cartridge such as the .303 British Enfield, headspace is the distance between the bolt face and the face of the chamber where the loaded cartridge rests. In a rimless cartridge such as a .308 the headspace is measured to the shoulder of the cartridge. This dimension is important for proper and safe firearm function regardless of the type of cartridge being checked. Too little headspace will not allow the bolt to fully close rendering the weapon unable to fire. Too much headspace can cause excess chamber pressure, as a result of the cartridge not being held firmly in the chamber on firing. This can be particularly dangerous given the chamber pressures generated by centerfire rifle cartridges.
Headspace gauges generally come in 3 sizes:

GO: measures the minimum acceptable headspace. This size is most often used when re-barreling or re-chambering a firearm.

NO-GO: This gauge is used to check for excessive headspace. If a firearm closes on the NO-GO gauge it is an indication that the weapon MAY not be safe to fire. Reloading ammunition for a firearm that fails NO-GO can result in unsafe loads due in part to the expended brass being elongated as a result of not being firmly chambered. Most military surplus firearms that pass NO-GO (the bolt will not fully close on the gauge) are considered safe to fire with surplus ammunition, or with modem loads not intended for reloading.

FIELD: A firearm failing the NO-GO spec can be tested on the slightly more forgiving FIELD gauge. Military chamber specifications are generally looser than commercial firearms, giving them a bit of tolerance for adverse conditions such as dirty chambers, weather extremes, etc. A firearm passing FIELD spec (not closing fully on the gauge) is generally considered safe to fire the ammunition it was designed to fire, i.e. military surplus ammunition of the designated caliber.

These are to be considered GENERAL GUIDELINES and are in no way intended to be an assurance of the safety of a particular firearm. If you have doubts about a firearm's safety and usability you should have it checked by a professional gunsmith.

Directions for use:
Make sure the firearm to be checked is UNLOADED.

Open and close the bolt on an empty chamber several times, making note of the amount of pressure needed to close the bolt. Knowing how the bolt feels on closing is important for proper usage of the gauge.

Wipe the gauge with a clean dry cloth to remove the protective oil residue. These gauges are made from hardened and ground 4140 steel for precision and durability, but they WILL rust if not kept oiled when not in use. A drop of any light oil such as 3 in 1 or gun oil will be sufficient. Re-oil the gauge before storing it in its bag.

Open the bolt far enough to allow you to insert the gauge on the bolt face, aligning the notch in the gauge with the extractor. The dimples in the gauge are for identification only and can face the chamber OR the bolt face.

GENTLY slide the bolt forward and with light finger pressure close the bolt. If you feel resistance DO NOT FORCE THE BOLT CLOSED. This can damage both the gauge and the firearm being tested.

The gauges are slightly magnetic and may stick to the chamber face when opening the bolt.

For the GO gauge the bolt should FULLY CLOSE with minimal pressure to pass.

For the NO-GO or FIELD the bolt SHOULD NOT fully close with minimal pressure to pass.

A qualified gunsmith must inspect any firearm failing both the NO-GO and FIELD before attempting to fire it. Failure to do so may result in personal injury or even death!
. DISCLAIMER

Okie Headspace Gauges assumes no liability for injury or damage caused by unsafe or improper use, malfunctions, defects, or other factors related to the use of any firearm. Our gauges are intended for use only as a preliminary inspection tool, and as such are not intended to replace a full inspection by a qualified gunsmith. Headspace is only one of a number of factors that can affect the safety of a firearm. Okie Headspace Gauges highly recommends that any firearm, regardless of age, be fully inspected by a gunsmith familiar with the type of firearm in question prior to use.

GO NO-GO FIELD
(One dimple) (Two dimples) (Three dimples)

GO = 0.064" NO-GO = 0.067" FIELD = 0.074".
 

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Since nobody said it already. Yes, headspace, but also if you are going to disassemble the rifle, DO IT IN THE RIGHT ORDER. Forend goes first, buttstock is the last thing you remove from the wrist.

To echo others, take lots of pictures, poste them here and ask questions if you're not 100% sure about something, before you do anything you will regret later.


From their site pictures...these have had a rough life...

Wood Air gun Shotgun Trigger Gun accessory
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank you guys, I have already had a great convo with Bryan over at BDL and he will be giving my new rife a good once over and barrel, I am going to use the gun as a range rifle and shooter, thank you for all the info and help, ill post pics once it gets here!
 

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I just bought a NO1 MK3 from atlantic firearms, I think I know what to expect, and they wee just posted however What should i go over once I have it in hand, I have no clue on how to check the headspace for starters. Any help would be great!
please do a detailed post when you get the rifle in ,

the pics on Atlantic's website show rifles that are not that bad looking , considering, other than one where the nosecap or forearm may have issues or not installed correctly, (barrel recessed)
 

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I saw those this morning but didn't have time to look.

I missed out on the K98's they got a few weeks ago. They had an "x" on the receiver, which I thought meant they were Russian Captures.. Anyway, sold out within minutes.

Watching thread with interest.
The Yugo M98 were the RTI guns from Ethiopian imports. Not RC. You didn't miss much.
 

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Why not wait until you get the rifle, check it over to a point where you feel comfortable shooting it (tied to some sawhorses for safety?), and see if it is A-OK?

Slug the barrel before you get a new one on...who knows...maybe your rifle will have some unusual collector value and will be better in its original state??
 

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I like Atlantic.. But in my personal opinion, most of those Ethiopian rifles are trash.. I mean, when is the last time you've heard about anything of quality coming out of Ethiopia? Not exactly the Swiss Watch makers of Africa.. Anything they surplus has no doubt been used to the point of truly being useless. While there are no doubt some decent ones mixed in here and there.. You're playing the lottery when in my opinion you could spend $100 or so more and get one of the nicer older imports on gunbroker or here in the trader.. There's plenty of them out there you just have to have patience.
 

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At this point, the OP pulled the trigger on the buy, so why don't we just wait until the rifle shows up. Who knows, we all may be pleasantly surprised.
 

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Well if you could get a decent rifle out of Ethiopia, and document its provenance, it will be of some historical interest a few decades from now. It all comes down to condition.

Not much comes out of Africa.

SA No4 reserve rifles (Savage and late Fazakerley rifles)
Some Rhodesian police rifles (3/4 variants)
Some Egyptian rifles (Hakim, FN 49, Rashid, SKS, No 1 MK III, 8mm Carcano, BO 48, some other Italian rifles)
Some Sinai rifles from Israeli (CZ 52 and SKS come to mind)
 
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