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No5 Mk2 never really transpired, and existed in trials phase only. These were reinforced (trigger hung on actions body, and gusseted) and tested for grenade use. A grenade spigot was attached around the flash hider and a level grenade sight attached to the left hand side. After trials, it was determined the No96 Enegerga grenade still damaged the action, and after only producing 100-150 of these trials rifles, the program was suspended. There are a few of these in private collections, but are extremely rare.

Refer to page page 245 Skennertons "The Lee Enfield" 2008 publishing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Thanks. I have just purchased a no.5 that was turned into a hunting rifle some years ago. I have it apart now, but will post photos as it is a very well made N0..5 destruction. Every electro pencil mark has been buffed off. It is what it is, but i was still hoping to date it some how. The gun has a lot of it's stamp marks left. On the bolt cocking piece it is stamped FY MK II. This may have been replaced of course, but it does seems that everything is original to the gun except all the wood and what ever is missing of course. The butt socket is marked with England so it was exported at some time. It was made by Fazakerley and is stamped RNC on the top of the receiver. Any thoughts would be helpful.

thanks scott
 

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Here are a few pics of mine. Notice it is not marked "No5 Mk 2." It has the trials script on the left side of the reciever wall.

These trials commenced in 1945 or '46, and were abandoned in 1947.
A wonderful example! Thanks for posting!
 
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I'd suggest that SMLE Addict's rifle is not in fact a Mk2 as the furniture is not as per the 'final' Mk2 model. It is however, certainly one of the developments models that led to the Mk2

There were in fact a number of trial varients of "No5 Mk2" as each was developed to try and overcome the 'wandering zero' (yes it did / does exist) as the No5 was on the cusp of being the standard infantry rifle and the No4's made obsolete.

Extract from an article in “The Lee Enfield Rifle” by Major EGB Reynolds.(Published in 1960)
A book well worth reading as it was researched and published whilst the Lee Enfield 'family' was still fresh in the minds of those who designed, built and used it and documentary evidence was still readily found.

The No5 Mk1 rifle had, however, one big fault : it was not easy to keep correctly sighted, and suffered from what was known as “wandering Zero”. This was a serious defect and many attempts were made to eradicate it. Trials were carried out with different forms of stocking up and a Mk2 pattern was eventually developed, with which further trials carried out in 1945 and 1946. In the new pattern the stock fore-end and hand-guard were extended to within about ½” of the rear of the flash eliminator, and the rear end of the fore-end was strengthened by a screw and nut. The band was positioned about three inches further forward to secure the lengthened fore-end and butt. The Mk2 never went into production, and it was eventually decided that the cause of the “wandering zero” was inherent in the design of the weapon and not the result of movement of unseasoned woodwork as had been suspected. The decision not to retain the No5 rifle in British service was made in July 1947 and it was declared obsolescent.
 

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Thanks. I have just purchased a no.5 that was turned into a hunting rifle some years ago. I have it apart now, but will post photos as it is a very well made N0..5 destruction. Every electro pencil mark has been buffed off. It is what it is, but i was still hoping to date it some how. The gun has a lot of it's stamp marks left. On the bolt cocking piece it is stamped FY MK II. This may have been replaced of course, but it does seems that everything is original to the gun except all the wood and what ever is missing of course. The butt socket is marked with England so it was exported at some time. It was made by Fazakerley and is stamped RNC on the top of the receiver. Any thoughts would be helpful.

thanks scott
Betting that RNC on top of the receiver is a poorly struck BNP (British Nitro Proof).
 

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Thanks. I have just purchased a no.5 that was turned into a hunting rifle some years ago. I have it apart now, but will post photos as it is a very well made N0..5 destruction. Every electro pencil mark has been buffed off. It is what it is, but i was still hoping to date it some how. The gun has a lot of it's stamp marks left. On the bolt cocking piece it is stamped FY MK II. This may have been replaced of course, but it does seems that everything is original to the gun except all the wood and what ever is missing of course. The butt socket is marked with England so it was exported at some time. It was made by Fazakerley and is stamped RNC on the top of the receiver. Any thoughts would be helpful.

thanks scott

start with posting them in a new thread,

and I would be Disasterdog is correct
 

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Betting that RNC on top of the receiver is a poorly struck BNP (British Nitro Proof).
BNP = Birmingham Nitro Proof to differentiate it from the London proof House which is just NP

Edit : Sorry DD - your last post was not showing until I posted and 'refreshed'
 
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