Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I have been "de-Bubba" restoring Mausers and Enfields during Covid (along with collecting other stuff). So far I have restored 3 WW I era No1 MK III's, keeping as original as possible. I poached a legitimate No 5 barreled receiver for 150 or so, with a bent barrel. After I got it, the barrel was junk, and the action may have sat in water for a bit, the left inside bolt channel had some light pitting. The important parts checked out with a gunsmith, so I had a sporterized No4 barrel installed, that was about 1/4 of an inch longer than a real No 5. Since originality wasn't an issue, I was going to make a No 4 "Tanker" out of it as a gift for a buddy that did that job in the Army. Ironically I bought a "sporterized" forend, thinking to use it, and it turned out to have a serial number at the end, just like a No 5. So I might have accidentally found a real No 5 forend.

I had the headspace checked with a mismatched No 4 bolt and a 0 bolt head, and everything seems good. However, following dry fire or manual decock, the bolt has a small amount of slop, maybe 1/8th inch forward/back. Is this bolt head size, or something else? I can take pictures if needed later.

Thank you
 

·
Platinum Bullet Member
Joined
·
59,095 Posts
headspaced with the same bolt that is installed?
or a different one?


Enfields are not really plug and play like US stuff,
the bolt should not move back or forward when it is in the locked (or ready to fire) position
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
headspaced with the same bolt that is installed?
or a different one?


Enfields are not really plug and play like US stuff,
the bolt should not move back or forward when it is in the locked (or ready to fire) position
It doesn't move/no slop when cocked either with or without a snapcap, but if you manual release the firing pin/decock, it has a slight amount of forward play without the snapcap. It is weird, and my No 4 rifle does not do the same thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
headspaced with the same bolt that is installed?
or a different one?


Enfields are not really plug and play like US stuff,
the bolt should not move back or forward when it is in the locked (or ready to fire) position
Yeah, Enfields are nothing like Mausers, and I played hell getting the 3x No1 Mk III's to have functional bolts, with in-tolerance bolt heads, AND correct headspace. I had enough leftovers to make 3 or 4 bolts, but a lot of the heads seemed out of tolerance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Putting aside the whole which bolt, which bolt head, correct fitting, bolt head overturn etc.

If I am understanding this correctly

The headspace for a Lee Enfield is measured from the front face of the Bolt head to the rear face of the chamber.
The max headspace is 0.074" over which the bolt must not close.
Your bolt has 0.125" 'slop' on top of anything else
At the minimum slop your CHS is to long by at least 0.051".

The slop disappears when cocked because the bolt is pulled and held rearwards by the pressure of the striker compressing its spring, this does not correct CHS.

The No1 Mk111 bolt heads were individually fitted to each rifle, not plugged and played.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks, I'll go back to the drawing board and try to figure out where the slop is coming from. I have 3 bolts I can compare. For the record, the original action had no bolt. I have a complete No 4 bolt that matches the barrel I put on the No 5, a No 5 bolt body from BRP, and numbers matched No 4 rifle I am using as my baseline. This No 5 is going to be mismatched at best. The donor No 4 rifle with the sportied barrel had been hacked to pieces, so I only kept the barrel and bolt.

I appreciate the advice-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,955 Posts
Ironically I bought a "sporterized" forend, thinking to use it, and it turned out to have a serial number at the end, just like a No 5. So I might have accidentally found a real No 5 forend.

No4 Forends were also numbered to match the body. (but obviously not when sporterised)

Even if not originally manufactured with numbered forends the instruction went out to armourers that on the rifles annual service (or before) the forend should be numbered.

Many were - some were not.

Writing implement Wood Pen Gun accessory Nail



The forend is as critical to making the rifle 'shoot straight' as the sights - hence it must be 'worked on' and matched to the rifle so they can be kept together if taken apart for service, painting etc.
Fitting a forend is not as easy as "offering it up and bolting it on".


There are three important parts to 'fitting a bolt' :
1) Headspace
2) Clocking
3) Locking lugs (making correct contact with the locking lugs in the body).

#1 & #2 can cause problens with inaccuracy, cases splitting and headspace increasing whilst #3 can be a serious challenge to health should the locking lug(s) shear off due to uneven loading.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I will take a picture when I get home, mine is a 4 digit cross stamp, at the end of the shortened forend. I have a No 4 like the one in your picture, but the No 5 forend I (apparently) have is in a different location, near where the rear barrel band would be on a No 4. I should have taken a bunch of pics prior to opening my yapper on here.

When I bought the forend, I was expecting it to be a shortened No 4, but it wasn't a typical hack job like the No 1's I bought.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,501 Posts
Even without addressing lug engagement & correct overclock on the bolt head…..

My concern would be the receiver, already lightened for the No.5, being warped in whatever process caused the barrel to be bent.

So, how in spec is your receiver?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Even without addressing lug engagement & correct overclock on the bolt head…..

My concern would be the receiver, already lightened for the No.5, being warped in whatever process caused the barrel to be bent.

So, how in spec is your receiver?
It was a distal bend, looked physical as opposed to heat related, like it got stepped on or something heavy dropped on it. I had a gunsmith take a look at it, and other than the bent barrel being a beotch to remove, they said it looked OK, but they weren't Enfield specialists. I live in NE WV, is there a place I can take it? At this point I am worried about the lugs with that sort of slop. I might do a short vid later to show what I mean. I got it for less than 150, so it isn't a huge deal if it just becomes a wall hanger.

thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,955 Posts
Use a spring balance to measure the 'weight' of the spring ............... it should be ~4lbs
From the Instructions to Armourers


Rectangle Font Water Parallel Number



The original Armourers Spring balance

Nickel Tool Bicycle part Composite material Metal



The Parker Hale Spring balance

Font Material property Newspaper Parallel Motor vehicle




And this picture of testing the Extractor srpring weight originally posted by "Son"



Wood Household hardware Tool Natural material Auto part
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top