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Discussion Starter #1
Just got a new M1, I have a couple of questions.

Been doing some research on sighting the rifle, I understand the general zeroing of modern rifles but have never zeroed any rifle this old. The research I have done is all over the place on potential quirks and "how to's". Also, it appears that there seem to be a number of different quirks depending on the manufacturer and era built (mine is a 54 H&R). Any "rule's of thumb" that I should know about to make sure that when I go to the range I have a fighting chance to hit paper?

Also, any good locations for a reasonably priced sling that works well for the rifle would be appreciated.
 

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Turner slings make high quality 1907 leather slings that shooters seem to appreciate and they’re the same or similar style as the older WW2 slings. They run about $80. They have “seconds” slings for about $55


There’s also a member on here named Jim Thompson (he wrote a book on the M1) who has some really nice leather 1907 slings for really great prices.

 

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Put your rear sight at zero windage. Aline the large mark on the rear of the sight base with the large mark on the reciever. Run the sight all the way down to the bottom of the elevation. Now come up 10 or12 clicks. that should put you on paper at 100 yds. Remember the sight is 1 minute of adjustment at 100 yards. Use M-2 ball ammo or a garand load from one of the ammo suppliers. You can also us a web sling. Nice thing about these is they have an infinate adjustment as compared to a leather sling. Think you really like shooting this puppy. Have fun.
 

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Use a large target board. Normally the M1 zeros for elevation at about 11-13 clicks from flat zero, but your EYE will determine your position. Be sure to adjust the front sight to approximate dead center and to peen, if necessary, the channels for the gas cylinder. If the cylinder slops around, NO WAY there can be true "zero". Loose gas cylinders and front sights are about 90% of the misunderstanding about M1 accuracy.

Edit 9:40 P.M. 2/23/2021: "flat zero" = "dead bottom", as low as an installed rear sight can mechanically go.

The T105 sight is the standard for iron sights, and until recently, worked exactly the same way as the rear sight on most M16 variants. Adopted right after WW2, it's the same as any other MOA-clicked receiver peep sight.

Get yourself a good manual. And LOTS of solid related literature, practical stuff. The collector's industrial histories are for collectors, and fine, but not much help. Grease is important--I use automotive wheel bearing grease. None of the stuff that costs 100x more is going to do any better, and oil is pretty much USELESS on the heavy parts of Mister Garand's rifle.

Most of the ammo "mysteries" are silly, extraneous internet ravings. Again: the hard literature is helpful, and it's especially good to remember that 173-grain M1 ball and even earlier loads were the first .30 Model of 1906 ammo to which the M1 was exposed.

My book is one of many, by the way, but the military Field and Tech Manuals are handy as well.

Slings?

I got so tired of rumors, flat-out lies, and hyperbole, decided to make some of my favorites accessible:



I'm the fellow mentioned above, two postings previous.

I'll have books available soon at $25.00, shipped and autographed, but mine isn't "magic". My "holiday" books sold out today, but will have more by this time next week.

It is, however, thorough, up-to-date, and purged of most internet hogwash.
 

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I shot in competition with the M1 Rifle for about 6 years. The 10 or 12 clicks elevation mentioned
above will get you on paper. That should get you in the center of a 10" bull with a six o'clock hold
at 200 yards. Elevation clicks up from the bottom will vary slightly from rifle to rifle and with
each shooter's sight picture.
 

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Here's an old post on how to set up and use the M1 Rifle sights, for both the combat (hunting) method and the Target shooters method.
BOTH can be used once you set the sights up. In other words, you can use the battle sight or the Target sight method as you want.
When hunting or plinking use the battle sight method, on the target range use the Target shooters method.

There are various methods of setting the sight so the markings agree with the range but the simple method is this.....

Raise the rear sight 8 to 10 clicks and shoot at 100 yards, adjusting the sight to get into the center of the target.
Note that you need to use point of aim-point of impact aiming. In other words, the bullets hit where the sights are aimed.
Aim at the center of the target and the bullets should hit the center after the sights are adjusted.

DO NOT use the target shooters 6:00 O'clock hold where you aim at the bottom of the black and the bullets hit up in the center. If you do that the sights will be off.

With the rifle sighted in and the bullets hitting the center, grip the elevation knob tightly with WELL PADDED pliers so it won't turn and unscrew the elevation knob screw.
It's a captive screw and won't come out.
Pull out on the elevation drum then turn it so the 100 yard mark lines up with the index mark on the receiver.
The 100 yard mark is the line under the "2" marking, which is 200 yards.
Push the drum in and gripping the drum with WELL PADDED pliers so it won't move, tighten the screw down snugly.

Check the setting by lowering the sight and then turn it back up so the 100 yard mark aligns with the receiver index mark.
Shoot the rifle to insure it's on target.

Note that this only works with USGI spec ammo. Heavier or lighter bullets or ammo loaded with non-GI spec powder will not target correctly.
Also note; this is the combat or hunting method of using the sight. It won't be perfectly exact for all ranges, but will be close enough for combat or hunting.

There is a "correct" method of doing this without using padded pliers, but this one is easier AS LONG AS YOU USE WELL PADDED PLIERS so you don't damage the elevation drum.

For full details see the US Field Manuals on the M1 Rifle.
You can get online copies on this site....Note the info at the page top on what username and password to use to get in.
This site has the users manuals and the Ordnance manuals........

Biggerhammer.net - Miscellaneous Firearms Technical and Training Manuals

With the elevation drum set, you can shoot at any range by turning the elevation drum to that range and with USGI spec ammo you'll be "Minute of man".

Happily, you can also still use the target shooters sight method.
Lower the sight down to the bottom and raise it about 8 to 10 clicks and shoot at a 100 yard Official target.
As you adjust the sight up or down keep track of how many clicks up or down.
Once your sighted in, just lower the sight, counting the clicks until it bottoms out.
Write that number down somewhere.
Now to get on an official target at 100 yards all you have to do is raise the sight that number of clicks.

Repeat this for every range you want to shoot at and write the number of clicks up for each range.
To shoot at any range you've done this for, just raise the sight that many clicks and shoot.

Note; This only works with official targets for a specific range. If you shoot a 200 yard official target set at 100 yards you'd be off.
Also note, the target shooters method is usually used with a 6:00 O'clock hold. That is you aim the sights down at the bottom of the black and the rifle puts the rounds up into the center.
The target shooters 6:00 O'clock aim is used because it's easier to align the sights with the target.
 

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Good advice above. I think you will really enjoy acclimating to your M1. It is one of my favorite surplus rifles to shoot and I particularly like the sights on them.

I would also vouch for Jim’s slings. I just received a couple more of his this week and love them.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Use a large target board. Normally the M1 zeros for elevation at about 11-13 clicks from flat zero, but your EYE will determine your position. Be sure to adjust the front sight to approximate dead center and to peen, if necessary, the channels for the gas cylinder. If the cylinder slops around, NO WAY there can be true "zero". Loose gas cylinders and front sights are about 90% of the misunderstanding about M1 accuracy.

The T105 sight is the standard for iron sights, and until recently, worked exactly the same way as the rear sight on most M16 variants. Adopted right after WW2, it's the same as any other MOA-clicked receiver peep sight.

Get yourself a good manual. And LOTS of solid related literature, practical stuff. The collector's industrial histories are for collectors, and fine, but not much help. Grease is important--I use automotive wheel bearing grease. None of the stuff that costs 100x more is going to do any better, and oil is pretty much USELESS on the heavy parts of Mister Garand's rifle.

Most of the ammo "mysteries" are silly, extraneous internet ravings. Again: the hard literature is helpful, and it's especially good to remember that 173-grain M1 ball and even earlier loads were the first .30 Model of 1906 ammo to which the M1 was exposed.

My book is one of many, by the way, but the military Field and Tech Manuals are handy as well.

Slings?

I got so tired of rumors, flat-out lies, and hyperbole, decided to make some of my favorites accessible:



I'm the fellow mentioned above two postings previous.

I'll have books available soon at $25.00, shipped and autographed, but mine isn't "magic". My "holiday" books sold out today, but will have more by this time next week.

It is, however, thorough, up-to-date, and purged of most internet hogwash.
I am interested in both the book and sling. Let me know how to order.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you all for the information. I’m definitely looking forward to getting out to the range in short order.
 
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