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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All!

I've got me a Mauser!!!!!

To back up a bit, my 19 year old son and I have just started collecting WWII era rifles used by both sides. Not just to collect, but to shoot and compare, etc. After research, I've decided to focus on the Mauser line, since there are so many variants used during that period.

What I got was a 24/47 Yugo, manufactured in 1944. This was built under Nazi supervision, as they were running Yugoslavia at the time. All parts match per original arsenal stamps. The stock is in very good condition (has wear marks, but not all beat up). The bluing is very strong (only places where it is thin are the usual hand hold/ touch places - plate under the receiver, parts of the trigger guard, etc). The rifling is of medium strength and everything very bright inside.

I preliminarily shot it yesterday, using Remington hunting rounds. These were used as the dealer could not confirm the head space and I wanted to confirm no blow back from an unknown rifle before trying higher power mil surplus rounds. It shoots sweet and accurate!!!!!

Some newbie Mauser questions:

1. What does it take to get the bolt safety lever to turn from "Fire" to "Safe" and "Ultra Safe" modes? I cannot get my safety to turn, but suspect that this is due to my ignorance on the practical side of this rifle. It seems to be stuck in the "Fire" position.

2. How do I remove the bolt? 'tried the usual techniques, like have the bolt open/pull trigger/pull the bolt out. No dice.

3. Also, where can I buy Mauser parts? This one is missing the hood on the front sight. The previous owner zeroed it for windage, by tapping it out of the rifle's alignment, but apparently lost the hood. I'd like to restore this feature to this fine rifle.

Thanks in advance.

Hillbilly
 

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What I got was a 24/47 Yugo, manufactured in 1944. This was built under Nazi supervision, as they were running Yugoslavia at the time. All parts match per original arsenal stamps. The stock is in very good condition (has wear marks, but not all beat up). The bluing is very strong (only places where it is thin are the usual hand hold/ touch places - plate under the receiver, parts of the trigger guard, etc). The rifling is of medium strength and everything very bright inside.

Did some one tell you that? Pure hokum.
A 24/47 is a model 1924 rifle produced in Belgium or more likely Yugoslavia which was then rearsenaled in a program started in 1947.

For your safety to operate the rifle must be cocked. The safety lever can then be moved to the upright position which will allow the bolt to be operated but the rifle not fired or fully right which locks the bolt. If with the rifle cocked you cannot move the safety lever then your safety needs repair.

Vlad
 

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Hi All!

Some newbie Mauser questions:

2. How do I remove the bolt? 'tried the usual techniques, like have the bolt open/pull trigger/pull the bolt out. No dice.

3. Also, where can I buy Mauser parts? This one is missing the hood on the front sight. The previous owner zeroed it for windage, by tapping it out of the rifle's alignment, but apparently lost the hood. I'd like to restore this feature to this fine rifle.

Thanks in advance.

Hillbilly
Hi, Hillbilly!

#2. The bolt is secured by a hinged "gate" which is on the left top side of the reciever. Hold the Mauser with your left hand on the floorplate immediately in front of the triggerguard and operate the bolt - pull it back as far as it'll go with your right hand; then use your left thumb to "open" the gate while continuing to pull back on the bolt. When you replace it, just push it in - the gate will automatically be pushed open. ( When you replace the bolt, it'll automatically cock unless you have the trigger pulled when you push it in. )

#3. I found one on eBay. The ones sold there as Genuine authentic WWII German AREN'T; they're Yugo surplus, perfect for your purpose. REAL German ones are a heavier spring steel than the post-war Yugos, but it looks fine on my RC K98k that was missing its.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks All!

The safety works fine. It was just stiff from lack of use. A stout push on it and it moved to all of the right positions. Now it easily moves among its three settings.

The bolt is out and it will be disassembled for a good cleaning and inspection. The safety being hard to initially set is all the more reason to disassemble/inspect/clean/lube it.

Also, thanks for heads up to look on eBay for the replacement hood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
An observation:

Surplus military rounds in the magazine cycle in and out "slick as a whistle." The ones I am trying are fully jacketed surplus Yugo rounds. Current hunting rounds from Remington tend to hang when swapping the rounds from magazine to receiver - not always, but, say 50 percent of the time. A side by side comparison was performed between these types and the difference was obvious. Either shoots well when chambered.

More on this later. I need to buy another batch or two of civilian branded rounds.
 

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Hillbilly,

Another feature of Mausers you may be unaware of: if you use a tool like a narrow-bladed screwdriver to press the recessed "button" on the floorplate ( which is the bottom of the magazine ), it will come off allowing you to safely unload any unfired rounds; you can also then easily clean it, the follower, and inside the magazine. The German infantrymen had a special tool included in their cleaning kits for this, but anything that'll fit will work. Japanese Arisakas ( which copy many Mauser features ) have an external button, which is easier to work, that similiarly releases the floorplate.
 

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If you thought it was made in 1944 because it has "44" on the side - that's not the date. The number 44 is the code for the factory which re-arsenaled it post-war. Factory code 44 was the ancestor of today's Zastava company. The rifle itself was originally made as the M24 in the 1920's or 30's and probably did see WW2 service with the Germans, their allies, or various partisans fighting against them (and each other) in the Balkans. When it was re-arsenaled post war, the original Royal Yugoslav crest was replaced with the Communist crest.
 
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