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Boiled linseed oil or tung oil. I believe I read somewhere that gunstocks were dipped in tung oil (post-war) once and allowed to dry before being assembled into a rifle at the factory.

After that initial tung oil treatment, rifles issued to soldiers were given applications of linseed oil by those soldiers. Linseed oil, if I remember my reading correctly, was what was in the supply system for the military. Naturally, soldiers (in peacetime) would find "wonder finishes" to apply to their rifles that would give it a high "parade ground" sheen. Just like using "leather luster" finish on black boots. It is faster and easier and looks pretty good. I imagine some of them got away with it.

Honestly, I have never read of soldiers applying linseed oil to their stocks while in combat. That doesn't mean it didn't happen. Perhaps it occurred when frontline units were taken offline for short periods for recuperation, etc. It is necessary for waterproofing the wood.

I was standing in line at the Camp Liberty PX in 2005 and noticed that the soldier in front of me had a sniper version of the M14 rifle, the M21. I was immediately struck dumb by the condition of his wood stock. It was so dried out it looked like bleached driftwood. I managed to refrain from launching into a discussion of the merits of regular applications of linseed oil to rifle stocks.

My own M14S wears a "big red birch" stock from Fred's. I played around with that finish. For about two weeks I would alternate a linseed oil coat, and then when that dried, a tung oil coat (not "tung oil finish"!). I eventually finished with several successive coats of tung in order to get the "wet wood" look that almost looks like a matte varnish finish. Looks pretty good and I know it is sealed excellently against water and probably pretty good against humidity too.
 

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A purist would use one of two greases for lubrication of the M1 rifle.

The original "grease pots" for M1 cleaning kits are still available in quantity. I know I've seen plenty of them at gunshows around here. These surplus "pots", small plastic containers holding enough grease to lube a rifle once after a good cleanng, contain "Plastilube". It is said to be better than the Lubriplate I talk about later in resisting heat.

http://www.scott-duff.com/ShooterAcc.htm

Honestly, seems a bit pricey to me.

Pre-dating the issue of Plastilube was Lubriplate, a white-colored grease. There are lots of Lubriplate greases out there. The one for M1s was called Lubriplate 130-A. Currently, Lubriplate seems to offer 130-AA, which they describe as an "excellent rifle grease". I have a tube of this in my kit and use it for my M1, M14, and bolt-action arms.

http://www.lubriplate.com/webstore/detail.aspx?ID=9

Brownells sells the original 130-A in 14 oz. cans, which should last a good, long while.

http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/st...6525&title=LUBRIPLATE+130-A+MIL.+SPEC.+GREASE

For awhile I used a "white lithium grease" on my M14, but it didn't seem to hold up well when temperatures rose. It got very "runny".

Fulton Armory seems to endorse Tetra Grease on their website. That might be worth a try too.
 

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That's a detail strip.

For example, why would you need to remove the stock ferrule or buttplate, like in figures 11 and 12 for routine cleaning?

The manual the CMP sends with your rifle will show you the difference between field stripping and detail stripping. It is easy. If you can do an M1A/M14, you can do an M1.
 
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