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I just sent in the paperwork for my first-ever M1 Garand, a CMP Service Grade. This will also be my first-ever USGI firearm, and I am a little nervous. All I know are Mausers and Mosins and AKs, and have been told that Garands are difficult guns to reassemble after stripping.

I have a few questions to ask the sages, if it's not a problem. Such as:

A. Why do the guys on the CMP forum say not to use new production, commercial ammunition in these? I'm quite fond of HotShot and Prvi Partizan and have always found them safe and reliable.

B. What parts will I need to grease? Is the brown axle grease from AutoZone o.k. to use?

C. Will my CMP Garand be safe to fire on arrival, after careful inspection and thorough cleaning? Or, does a gunsmith *still* need to check it out, anyway? There are no gunsmiths around here that I trust very much, sad to say.

Well, that's all I can think of for now. Thanks for any info and help...

Very sincerely,

Scott
 

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For the most part from what ive seen,garands tend to be a little picky on commercial ammo.USGI or Greek is probably the best bet,while there is still a good ammount out there. I put some Olympic 30-06 through my Dane garand, usually theres one or 2 that dont push the bolt back far enough to kick out the casing.It could just be a bad batch,but you never know. I havent had any trouble with greek or even WW2 surp ammo. Keep in mind WW2 surp requires extra cleaning. As for C make sure you clean that bugger out good. I bought a 1903 from the cmp and after approximately 5 days,the stock and gun were grease free. You might want to buy some headspace gauges,I think the cmp has them,they are a good investment. Maybe one of the gentlemen on the boards would headspace and time the thing for you. Other than that it should be good to go. If your garand has a timing issue then it may have to be sent to a smith. Some garands have a timing issue where they eject the clip a bit earlier than they should. Ive seen a few of those. One that passed by me,every 3 rds it would throw the clip out.


(P.S if any of my info is inncorrect,do correct me,but im pretty sure its spot on)
 

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The reason you shouldn't use commercial ammo in a Garand is that the burn rate of the powder,and the resultant pressure curve,may be different than what the rifle was designed for.This can result in more gas coming through the gas cylinder than the design allows for,and can stress the action or even bend the operating rod.However,there is hope.You can install a Schuster or McCann adjustable gas plug,which vents the excess pressure (once adjusted) and allows the use of commercial ammo.Midway sells the Schuster plug for around $35.00,Fulton Armory has the McCann for around $40.00 .
 

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A. Why do the guys on the CMP forum say not to use new production, commercial ammunition in these? I'm quite fond of HotShot and Prvi Partizan and have always found them safe and reliable.

B. What parts will I need to grease? Is the brown axle grease from AutoZone o.k. to use?

C. Will my CMP Garand be safe to fire on arrival, after careful inspection and thorough cleaning? Or, does a gunsmith *still* need to check it out, anyway? There are no gunsmiths around here that I trust very much, sad to say.

A. The M1 rifle was NOT designed to shoot the commercial round known as "30-06 Springfield". It was designed to shoot the US Military round known as "US Caliber .30". They look the same and will chamber in the same weapons. They are NOT the same round. USGI specs for pressure curve are quite different from SAAMI spec for commercial ammo. Many commercial varieties of 30-06 have a pressure curve that will cause damage to the M1 rifles gas system.

To stay safe and "in spec" with the M1 rifles gas system shoot only milsurp M2 ball ammo. Currently extant ammo includes USGI M2, Korean M2, both KA and PS headstamps (Note: KA is corrosive), and Greek HXP M2.

B. Get "The M1 Owners Guide" by Scott Duff. All you need to know about maintaining your M1 rifle.

C. The onus of safety with shooting any weapon is on the shooter . The statement from the CMP is mainly a CYA thing..... but if it makes you feel better.... have the rifle checked out.

Re Ammo: Please note that the Greek commercial Olyimpic Brand 30-06 ammo is NOT safe for the M1 rifle. Muzzle flash and report are noticeably higher than normal military M2 ball. This is a sure indicator of ammo that is loaded with powder that is way too slow and unsuitable for the M1 rifles gas system. Damage can be occuring over time with each round fired. Once the damage becomes apparent it is too late.... Parts replacement will be the only recourse. I believe that this is the primary reason that M1 op-rods are becoming so expensive in recent years..... The price has tripled in just the last 2 years.

If the Olympic brand that you were firing was on the low end of pressure... this just shows a total lack of consistency to the product. Not a good thing for an M1 at all.

Just my 2 bits,
Swampy

Garands forever
 

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The CMP sends a booklet along with M1s entitled "Read This First". It is an excellent booklet and has nearly all the facts you need to maintain your M1. Disassembly is pretty easy. I am mechanically all thumbs and after a little practice, I have no problem disassembling and reassembling my Garand. I don't usually even have too many pieces left over!!:p
 

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Olympic ammo is about the worst ammo I have ever used in any caliber.

I seems to me some commerical ammo maker would step up and make ammo according to mil. specs.. The demand is there and the surplus will not last forever.

Does anyone know when LC and FO stopped using corrosive primers? Also, I understand all the US Military match ammo made since about 1960 is noncorrosive including 308. Is that also correct? TIA.
 

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about

about late 1952 or 1953 is when they switched over to non-corrosive primers but I could be wrong. I always clean as if it was corrosive ammo just to be safe.
 

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Everybody has giving you great advice but I think there missing certain things. You can shoot commercial ammo but DONT go over 175 grain bullet. Your dealing with allot of presure an you dont want to bend your op rod. There are parts to grease and part to oil. I personally use Shooters Choice grease and Hoppe's Oil. They are not hard to assemble and disassemble. If you dont have a bolt disassemble tool get one. Its allot easier than using a flat head screw driver. Get some Boiled Linseed Oil for the stock. Dont varnish the stock. Respect your fore fathers and leave the varnish for Bubba.
 

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Boiled linseed oil or tung oil. I believe I read somewhere that gunstocks were dipped in tung oil (post-war) once and allowed to dry before being assembled into a rifle at the factory.

After that initial tung oil treatment, rifles issued to soldiers were given applications of linseed oil by those soldiers. Linseed oil, if I remember my reading correctly, was what was in the supply system for the military. Naturally, soldiers (in peacetime) would find "wonder finishes" to apply to their rifles that would give it a high "parade ground" sheen. Just like using "leather luster" finish on black boots. It is faster and easier and looks pretty good. I imagine some of them got away with it.

Honestly, I have never read of soldiers applying linseed oil to their stocks while in combat. That doesn't mean it didn't happen. Perhaps it occurred when frontline units were taken offline for short periods for recuperation, etc. It is necessary for waterproofing the wood.

I was standing in line at the Camp Liberty PX in 2005 and noticed that the soldier in front of me had a sniper version of the M14 rifle, the M21. I was immediately struck dumb by the condition of his wood stock. It was so dried out it looked like bleached driftwood. I managed to refrain from launching into a discussion of the merits of regular applications of linseed oil to rifle stocks.

My own M14S wears a "big red birch" stock from Fred's. I played around with that finish. For about two weeks I would alternate a linseed oil coat, and then when that dried, a tung oil coat (not "tung oil finish"!). I eventually finished with several successive coats of tung in order to get the "wet wood" look that almost looks like a matte varnish finish. Looks pretty good and I know it is sealed excellently against water and probably pretty good against humidity too.
 

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i used to feel the same way about the M1 rifle before i ordered mine from the CMP. and what i tell you i tell you from experience: they are worth every penny and everyone should own one.

when i go shooting i actually look forward to cleaning my M1 because it is so easy to disassemble and reassemble. follow the picture posted above by M1 crazy and remember that M1s love their grease. i use Hoppes 9 Gun grease and it works pretty good, mind you everyone has their favorite, but always use "gun" grease. its available anywhere gun cleaning stuff is sold. any other type of grease will just get weird on you with the heat and powder residue.

as far as the ammo goes stick to surplus 30-06. its just what these rifles were designed for; i would not recommend going off of the beaten trail in this area. CMP sells surplus ammo for decent prices as well as most retailers with some markup.

if you have any problems with your rifle just call the CMP. they are exemplary for their customer service, which is completely contradictory to their "as is" clause in the paperwork. they really want to be sure you receive a good functional rifle and for round about ~$600 you can't beat both the quality and service. pretty much you should be able to take the rifle right out to the range when you receive it after a quick once over like you do with any other firearm.

please let us know when you receive your garand and post pictures if you can!
 

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Great advice from everyone. I just like to add my .02 on what grease to use, everybody has their favorite of course. I prefer Tetra Gun Grease for my Garands but have used the brown grease in those little tubs that fit in the butt stock when out of Tetra. I hope you get a great rifle with some history for your first M1.
 

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A purist would use one of two greases for lubrication of the M1 rifle.

The original "grease pots" for M1 cleaning kits are still available in quantity. I know I've seen plenty of them at gunshows around here. These surplus "pots", small plastic containers holding enough grease to lube a rifle once after a good cleanng, contain "Plastilube". It is said to be better than the Lubriplate I talk about later in resisting heat.

http://www.scott-duff.com/ShooterAcc.htm

Honestly, seems a bit pricey to me.

Pre-dating the issue of Plastilube was Lubriplate, a white-colored grease. There are lots of Lubriplate greases out there. The one for M1s was called Lubriplate 130-A. Currently, Lubriplate seems to offer 130-AA, which they describe as an "excellent rifle grease". I have a tube of this in my kit and use it for my M1, M14, and bolt-action arms.

http://www.lubriplate.com/webstore/detail.aspx?ID=9

Brownells sells the original 130-A in 14 oz. cans, which should last a good, long while.

http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/st...6525&title=LUBRIPLATE+130-A+MIL.+SPEC.+GREASE

For awhile I used a "white lithium grease" on my M14, but it didn't seem to hold up well when temperatures rose. It got very "runny".

Fulton Armory seems to endorse Tetra Grease on their website. That might be worth a try too.
 

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Congratulations on ordering your first M1 Garand! I was in the same boat two years ago, experience with other surplus rifles, but not US rifles. There has been a lot of good advice given, but here is my .02: (I hope I don't repeat)

1. The manual CMP ships with the rifle is excellent. There are many other books available, but this one is a good start.
2. I have used Tetra grease with good results, as well as Lubriplate.
3. I was advised to change all of the springs on my rifles prior to the first trip to the range. This was good advice. I have done this and have never experienced any problems with my Garands. Spring kits are available from Orion7 and many others.
4. I have heard that the reason to stick with surplus M1 ball ammunition (as opposed to commercial ammunition) in a Garand is due to the potentially "soft" primers associated with commercial ammunition. There may be commercial brands that are not a concern, but the price on surplus Ball is so reasonable that I haven't looked into other types.
5. Once you fire your Garand you may find that your other rifles don't get out to the range very often.

Good luck! I hope you don't have to wait too long!
 

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That's a detail strip.

For example, why would you need to remove the stock ferrule or buttplate, like in figures 11 and 12 for routine cleaning?

The manual the CMP sends with your rifle will show you the difference between field stripping and detail stripping. It is easy. If you can do an M1A/M14, you can do an M1.
 
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