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The order to 'brown' = 'blue' these bayonets came in the 1930's IIRC (?1933?, as that sticks in my mind). Certainly an odd style adopted here, though!

The lack of a 1920 stamp is not in itself a big deal as this could have been ground off, but the lack of a Reichswehr unit stamp is more of a puzzle.

That aside, the great majority of dated bayonets of this type are, I think, 1915 or 1917 - for some reason 1916 examples are uncommon, and 1918 ones very rare - if they exist at all!

Julian
 

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I have 2 J A Henckels 84/98 bayonets dated 1916 and 1918.

I also have 1 Gottliebe Hammesfahr / BAYARD 84/98 dated 1916.

1918 dated 84/98 bayonets do seem to be hard to find. Maybe more so than 98/05 (18) dated examples.
Yes, without looking at my greatly out of date files, I agree, it is rarer to find a 1918 dated 98/05 than a 84/98.

Julian
 

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... LOL ...I'm laughing cause your question is so "Civilian" and typical of collectors who think military are looking at dates, proof marks and all manner of trivia ountries re cycle stuff to re use, just be aware of that.
No need to be rude! I think we are all aware of recyling. Look at all those Donbas 'conscripts' in East Ukraine today armed with M-N M.91/33's! And look at the over 20+ types of bayonet Turkey used into the 1950's...

The real matter under discussion here, matey, is the blueing...

The (two tone) blade bluing is something I've not seen on Yugo re-work K98 bayonets. As someone already mentioned, it has the characteristics of bluing seen on some British M1907 SMLE bayonets. Did Britian ever re-work any German items for reissue?
Quite - the blueing style here is very distinctive, as used on P.1907's, which our friend milprilrb does not seem to understand or be aware of(?)... I am by no means a bayonet expert but I have never seen that style used anywhere else - I am perfectly happy to be corrected! As far as I am aware the 20th century UK never re-used German bayonets.

One thought, though, is that the Bundesgrenzschutz was formed under allied control and so could have been issued with re-conditioned stuff?
 

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I emphasise the blueing because individual countries do have their own specific ways of treating steel blades. I am - as I have said - not a bayonet expert, but I have seen a far few in my time, and know reasonably well all the Western European post 1871 and pre-WW2 ones.

I note that AndyB - who knows Central and Eastern European bayonets better than most - hasn't made a comment on this one re: the blueing (or browning as the Germans termed it!). Over to you AndyB:)

Julian
 
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