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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, new member here!

I recently got a Chilean 1895 carbine and wanted to share it with you all. It lacks import marks, so I was curious if anyone had any insight about these rifles and their history. I know they were sold to various places after their stint in Chile, so there may be some fun history involved, other than simply sitting in a Chilean arsenal for 100 years.

Mine has a matching action, barrel, bolt body, and trigger guard. A lot of the small parts are not matching and the stock looks to have been swapped off of an A prefix carbine. The bore is super sharp until about the last half inch, where it has quite a bit of wear. Hopefully it can still shoot straight. We will see this weekend.







Though hard to capture with a phone, the plum follower is pretty pleasant.



Early single spring lock rear sight.







If there are other parts of the rifle of interest, let me know and I'll take more pictures.
 

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Hello, new member here!

I recently got a Chilean 1895 carbine and wanted to share it with you all. It lacks import marks, so I was curious if anyone had any insight about these rifles and their history. I know they were sold to various places after their stint in Chile, so there may be some fun history involved, other than simply sitting in a Chilean arsenal for 100 years.

Mine has a matching action, barrel, bolt body, and trigger guard. A lot of the small parts are not matching and the stock looks to have been swapped off of an A prefix carbine. The bore is super sharp until about the last half inch, where it has quite a bit of wear. Hopefully it can still shoot straight. We will see this weekend.







Though hard to capture with a phone, the plum follower is pretty pleasant.



Early single spring lock rear sight.







If there are other parts of the rifle of interest, let me know and I'll take more pictures.
I hope it shoots as good as it looks!
 

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I have the corresponding rifle. Mint and not import marked. That is common for the rifles. I like carbines too. I generally prefer a carbine right across the board. I like almost anything in 7x57. But; I take them as I find them. Anyway, I like yours. Looks like a good honest gun to me.

I did see a whole rack of 1895's at Cabelas pre covid, pre riots. While, I am not a real collector and condition is a secondary consideration to me, I had to take a hard pass on those. I was surprised that junk that bad would still be found in storage with any military! Now, we have a new low with Ethiopia quansett hunt condition. Dont get this wrong, I would pleased to have one like yours. Very much. Maybe sometimes, less history is better.
 

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Nice carbine.

Mismatching small bits and swapped stock might indicate some service use. Until recently other than the 1973 military coup to depose a socialist president that was carrying the country into a chaotic mess (Sadly now they're back and about to wreck the country again), Chile has been a rather stable, relatively peaceful nation with no wars or revolutions after the mid 1890s and, to S.A. standards, VERY LOW crime rates. Maybe some small revolts here & there but nothing important as long as I recall (In-laws are Chilean and have been there quite a few times)

Due to its size and weight these rifles were ideal to patrol either on foot or horseback the very harsh Chilean geography, virtually a thin strip of cold, desertic coastline jammed between the sea and the steep Andean mountains chain, full of valleys, rivers and forests, that extends North to South to the nearly artic Patagonia. In the cities they might have seen some light duty such as drills, guard posts or maybe some law enforcement tasks, but seldom if ever shot in anger.
 

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Welcome to Gunboards Liam and nice looking carbine! Like others who have posted, I gravitate toward carbines as well and have a M1895 carbine in the C-prefix range as well. It is a great shooter and the 7 x57mm cartridge is suprisingly easy on the shoulder, even in this short-barrelled carbine.

If you want a good reference source to look into for details on your carbine, try David Nielsen's "History of the Mauser Rifle in Chile". Good source, and surprisingly affordable

One other thought: if you find the rifle's accuracy wanting and think it is due to the worn rifling near the muzzle, you might look into having a gunsmith counter-bore the muzzle to remove the offending worn areas.
 

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My thoughts on counter bore are not to do that. I have plenty of guns that shoot poorly. That inludes (or past tense,included) two brand new Rugers. I am talking 6 MOA or more with a scope! There are lots of reasons and sometimes you never know why. it can be months or with current shortages years trying bullets and messing with pressure pads and screws and shims. Add to that carbines with mauser sights not the easiest guns to shoot well or beyond 50 yards for some of us. On the other hand a counter bore may really hurt the resale and there is no putting it back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah, I don't plan on doing anything to the rifle. It will be a little disappointing if it keyholes, but it's a 126 year old military rifle at the end of the day. They didn't treat them as nicely as the Swedes did!
 

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Nice carbine. It was most likely imported directly from Chile before import marks were required. Without checking, I think marks were required in 1968.
 

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Liam:

Very nice! And welcome to the forum! 👍
 

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Anything made by Ludwig Lowe is an antique (pre-1899) and not required to be import marked.

Nice honest gun. Yours shows fairly typical service wear. Small parts were replaced as needed. Stocks were a high-mortality item, often replaced.

Pleasant shooters in 7mm.

M
 

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Welcome to the Mauser Forum, Liam!

Thanks for posting this beautiful Chile M95 Carbine. Unike the Long rifles, the Carbines and Short rifles saw significant more use, so they're no longer available in unused condition... (like some M95 Long rifles)

Your Chile M95 carbine looks to be in pretty good condition: receiver crest still visible, matching bolt body, stock not ridden to death! The bolt innards (firing pin, spring...) were exchanged, since the Chilean gunsmiths changed the whole bolt innards, when the firing pin or spring broke...

If you feel the need for counter-boring, please feel free. Lots of these carbines are either ridden to death, or cleaned to death, due to their long service life. Again: don't compare the carbines to the Long rifles --> these had usually a quiet life in the rack...

For comparison: here 3 of my Chile M95 samples: Long rifle ('A' series), Short rifle ('C'), Carbine ('C')
The Long rifle is in most original condition, all matching #, with just some dents on the stock. Original fire blueing on bolt stop, and rear sight slider. Shoots perfectly!
The Short rifle and Carbine are in heavily used condition, with lots of wear on the metal parts (incl. receiver crest!). Carbine is matching # on most parts
3844031

3844033


hope this is helpful, Chris
 

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My short rifle is also a "C" block and definitely has seen a lot of use. Bore was kinda crappy but JB bore paste did make it much better. Bullet weight during its time of use was most likely the 175 grain round nosed bullet. Don't hold me to it but Grafs sells the Privi Partisan line of bullets and brass. And seem to remember that they had some 175 grain spitzers still up for sale. Again nice short rifle. Frank
 

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Anything made by Ludwig Lowe is an antique (pre-1899) and not required to be import marked.
... snip ...
I know this is 100% correct. I will add an observation The Lowe guns I saw at Cabelas were import marked and were only sold after a background check. It was apparently easier for CAI importer to stamp them all, rather than sort or risk any employee errors. Cabelas same deal, better safe than sorry and risk a mistake.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I am out at my parents' place for the weekend, so I took the Mauser with me and did a quick test to see how it was stabilizing bullets. The target is odd, but it was the only thing I could find sitting around. The groups aren't impressive for 20 yards off hand, which was partly due to me being low key worried about the potential odds of sending a bolt into my face.



This was 173 grain S&B SPCE. The quasi wadcutter design cuts really nice holes. The bottom right hole looks a little off, but I think that was due to the box being tilted back more than with the other shots.



This was 140 grain Federal SPs. It looks like the rifle is stabilizing bullets decently enough, in spite of almost being a smooth bore for the last half inch or so. I bet those long S&B bullets have a decent potential for accuracy out of these old rifles.
 

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I know this is 100% correct. I will add an observation The Lowe guns I saw at Cabelas were import marked and were only sold after a background check. It was apparently easier for CAI importer to stamp them all, rather than sort or risk any employee errors. Cabelas same deal, better safe than sorry and risk a mistake.

There are many retailers that are unaware of the antique status, or, by policy, automatically run full background checks for all firearms sales regardless of the status.
 
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