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Hi Alan,
What is the issue with removing the butt first. I’ve always heard it but never understood it
With thanks
Alan
The square end of this;

Household hardware Nickel Electric blue Metal Screw


Goes into the square opening in this.

Finger Wood Creative arts Gas Household hardware



So imagine what happens then you take a big screwdriver and turn the stock bolt left, while the forend is still attached...
 

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The square end of this;

View attachment 4046911

Goes into the square opening in this.

View attachment 4046907


So imagine what happens then you take a big screwdriver and turn the stock bolt left, while the forend is still attached...
Is the purpose of the square profile on the end of the stock screw to fit a spanner (wrench for our US friends) on if the screw is too tight to remove via the normal method with a screwdriver?
al
 

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Is the purpose of the square profile on the end of the stock screw to fit a spanner (wrench for our US friends) on if the screw is too tight to remove via the normal method with a screwdriver?
al
I don't think so, but I don't now for sure. Based on the fact that it interfaces with a steel plate in the back of the forend, I'm thinking the whole assembly was to provide more lateral and torsional strength to the forend-wrist interface. Notice that in the no.4 this was replaced with a steel strap, for lateral reinforcement. If the spanner purpose was the main goal here, I don't think they would have designed the plate to fit in such a way, that turning the bolt breaks things.
 
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Mongrel61,

You have a Short Magazine Lee Enfield (SMLE) Mk III* produced in 1919. The FTR below that stands for "Factory Thorough Repair," meaning at some point in its life (most likely before the start or WW2 or right after Dunkirk) it was refurbished. A new barrel was (or should have been) installed, new furniture, and other worn items replaced. Unfortunately, the bolt is mismatched.

All the other marks are examiners and inspectors marks.

Magazines are available for your rifle. Liberty Tree collectors, Apex gun parts, on-line auctions etc., have magazines. Make sure you order/buy a magazine for the SMLE MK III, or SMLE mk 3, or Lee Enfield No 1 Mark 3. All the same rifle, but sellers often call it by any variation of what I wrote above. A No 4 magazine WILL NOT work in your rifle.

And, as per the previous posts, you have the reasoning for the disassembly procedure. Nice rifle, and welcome to the Forum.
 

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The disassembly procedure requires a few other things to be concerned with aside from buttstock removal.
Proper removal of the forend is just as important.
Things like the order of the trigger guard screws. Not tipping the forend down and off by its front end etc.
Even though it would seem that would be the way to do it for the first-timer.
 

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You have a Short Magazine Lee Enfield (SMLE) Mk III* produced in 1919. The FTR below that stands for "Factory Thorough Repair," meaning at some point in its life (most likely before the start or WW2 or right after Dunkirk) it was refurbished. A new barrel was (or should have been) installed, new furniture, and other worn items replaced.
I was thinking the same, furniture looks the part. Might be the original barrel on this one though! Stacking swivel likely omitted by this point & unnecessary for a “restoration”.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
smle addict

Thank you for the info. I did end up finding a magazine from Apex (they are just down the road from me). Overall the gun seems to be in decent shape considering it has just sat in a box for the last 40 years. Just some minor rust here and there and dust grim in what ever lube was still in place. The chamber and bore seem to be clean and rust free. Once I track down the tool for removing the firing pin I will give the bolt a good look but the spring seems to be strong and crisp and the action seems to be smooth.
 

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If it were mine, I'd not take firing pin out of bolt, no need to do that. If weapon dry fires , all is needed is some oil shot into the bolt to keep things operational. Not much needed. Now with a non matching bolt, you do face some decisions regarding whether the rifle has correct head space or not. Many threads can be found addressing this issue. Its not just if the rifle goes bang and nothing happens. Since this is about a safety issue / potential risk, don't shoot live ammo in that a rifle unless its been thoroughly checked properly for head space.
 

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Since this is about a safety issue / potential risk, don't shoot live ammo in that a rifle unless its been thoroughly checked properly for head space.
And, more importantly, CHECK THE LOCKING LUGS INTERFACE CORRECTLY WITH THOSE IN THE ACTION.

With Lee Enfields, bolts are NOT plug & play. Work is needed to FIT then correctly.
 

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The problem with a mis matched bolt is the information above is inconvenient and rationalized away. Seen it done for decades and the party line of non believers is "Nothing bad happened". Indeed and thankfully so but I ask you, do you years from now want your son or grand son to find out tragically the rifle cause injury? That is a yard stick I'd recommend thinking about because when you are gone, that rifle will exist and potentially can injure someone. If anything I own could hurt my son firing it, its fixed or destroyed. No...I'll leave no grenades with pins pulled around to hurt anyone.

Ten fingers, Ten Toes, Two Eyes and One Face....Don't put any to risk.
 
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