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Hi guys - been lurking a long time - and finally picked up my first arisaka type 99 yesterday! (and a pair of enfields to boot)

using the great info from this site, it looks like its a Series 30 Toyo Kogyo rifle, serial # 99xxx.

I couldnt find any more parts numbers on the rifle - one link I was on seemed to indicate you could find a part number on the bayoney lug, but I don't see anything there.

Mum is untouched and the Bolt and Received match. It has the aircrafft sights.

The stock looks like someone hit it with a varnish or shellac at some point - and perhaps the exposed received and barrel metal got oversprayed - its a little shiny.

The bore is excellent and shiny. Sorry for the photo quality - I only had my camera phone handy.

So - what say ye experts? Shoulk I leave the stock alone , or do a little refinishing work to get the sheen off? Anything else I could/should know about the rifle? I am curious what year of production it is and couldnt figure that out.

PS: I paid $325 for it - I was hoping to stay under $300, but this one spoke to me - hopefully I didnt do something stupid - I'm still a novice when it comes to gauging the value of these old rifles.

hershmeister
 

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In my opinion the price is a little high, but the "speaks to me" factor has caused me to pay above market rate for rifles before and I have seldom regretted it. As far as finish goes, there rifles do have a sheen from the factory but if it is on the metal as well then it may need some careful restoration. if the stock wasnt sanded then the 2 proofs should be visible on the under side of the stock as seen in the pics below. To remove youll have to figure out the type of finish and use the appropriate solvent to gently and carefully remove the offending coating with out damaging the original finish. more difficult then it sounds but with patience it can work quite well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Mike - thanks for the reply - I do not see any cartouches on the underside of the stock - so they must be gone from a prior sanding job.

Now you have me wondering how badly did I overpay on this puppy - I'm still learning how to gauge the value of these relics. If for no other reason so I know ho to shop better next time.

PS: How can I determine my year of manufacture? Any tips?
 

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Knowing that T99 production started in 1941 and ended in 45, and the order of the series; you can pretty well estimate the year of mfg.

Your 30th is likely an early 1942 rifle.

Or you can buy the T 99 book when available and get the free chart inside.;)
 

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The book referred to is 'The Japanese T99 Arisaka Rifle' .
It must be sold out, but keep an eye on this forum. Maybe they'll crank out some more. The book has a very good chart in it that gives the approximate dates of manufacture. I think the original factory records may have been lost due to repeated visits by the U.S. Army Air Corps. Unlike many other countries, the japanese didn't stamp dates on their rifles. They did stamp series numbers on them (the serial numbers repeat themselves with each series), which helps establish a date of manufacture.

Dean (the other one)
 

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PRVI Partizan makes a 174 grain FMJ round in both .303 British and 7.7 Japanese. Reloading ammo should be easy enough for those three rifles. You can use the same primers, powder and .311 bullets in both the Enfields and the type 99 Arisaka. No use paying $40+ plus for a box of Norma soft points unless you are gonna do some hunting with the Arisaka...
 

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Hershmeisrter, don't sweat the price. Like others have said before me, you just bought it a little too soon. It will be a fun rifle to learn on.
I would follow Mike Rockwell's advice on cleaning the stock. Work carefully on the bottom side of the buttstock, there is where the proofs are. The proofs may start to show through as you remove some of the oil etc. from it. If you think it is a "shellac [sp?], alcohol will cut it.
Congratulations!

Chuck
 

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I thought the original poster had said it was a 20th series or kokura rifle, hence i posted kokura stock proofs. Well if he edited his original post or if i was in another galaxy below is a pic of a typical toyo kogyo "hiro" proof. On toyo kogyo this mark is repeated for both the upper and lower positions. on 30th and early 31st series there is an additional "mini 'hiro'" which is in the 2nd pic
 

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The book referred to is 'The Japanese T99 Arisaka Rifle' .
It must be sold out, but keep an eye on this forum. Maybe they'll crank out some more. The book has a very good chart in it that gives the approximate dates of manufacture. I think the original factory records may have been lost due to repeated visits by the U.S. Army Air Corps. Unlike many other countries, the japanese didn't stamp dates on their rifles. They did stamp series numbers on them (the serial numbers repeat themselves with each series), which helps establish a date of manufacture.



IMA has them for $5.00; just looked there a few minutes ago (I also aquired a type 99 the other day--FREE with an M1 Garand!)
 
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