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OK so I just bought a new Mauser on Gunbroker and my question is what kind of Mauser action does it have?

Western Field Model 750A EGP 30-06 Bolt Action Rifle - Bolt Action Rifles at GunBroker.com : 882813798

It is listed as a Western Field Model 750A which I know is a Golden State weapon and that they usually used military Mausers as a base. However I can tell that it isn't a military Mauser so what kind of a commercial one is it?
The Weaver catalogue lists the bases for the 750A as # 67 and #65 which are different from the Mauser 98 bases.

Thanks for the help.
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The bolt handle is neither FN nor Zastava pattern. Perhaps that defaults to Santa Barbara of Spain, assuming it's original. 'Most' such actions were marked "Spain" on receiver ring underside, or thereabouts. This particular rifle action in pix, utilizing the earlier standard striker impinging safety mauser action, versus the FN termed "Supreme" action with sliding trigger impinging safety. The Supreme more popular, though I prefer the classic as here. That for the ever so much more direct and positive safety system.
Lore over decades of SB questionable steel composition and of heat treating. It does seem probable there were some "soft actions". Also apparently that there was something akin to a recall - perhaps limited to guns yet in the hands of manufacturers. Another seemingly factual matter that Parker Hale experienced some soft SB actions in their production process. Perhaps the reason moving to Zastava.
I'd buy an SB rifle based on chambering, configuration and adjusted price. Also, contingent upon a satisfactory headspace check, soon as practicable.
Good luck with that rifle!
John
Best & Stay Safe.
 

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John,

I don't recall Parker Hale using Zastava actions. Not that it may not have happened but I've never come across a Parker Hale that used a Zastava action. If you got a pic, I'd love to see it. As for soft SB actions, the issues I'm familiar with are the exact opposite; actions too hard. Early on, SB flame hardened their actions in much the same manner that plagued Springfield armory, they eyeballed them. Actions too hard typically display a purple hue.

The OP's particular rifle is neat in that the blind magazine sheds a goodly amount of weight and makes for a handier rifle than your average commercial Mauser variant.
 

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full length photo of rifle, barrel and sights!
would be nice!

they didn't! use SB post 1963 back,
they use military receivers. from war inventory's stored in tunnels once govt. they bought the facility.
later the test fire tunnel.
after 63 some where in the following years SB were used!
over hardened purplish receivers ive also heard or too hot bluing solutions ?
when i wrote the factory ENG. concerning safari delux model I have.
pre SB.yes!
Company didn't have that info saying, ww2, records?
and, when ever the inventory of captured stored rifles ran out date?
 

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Regarding the purple color on either the receiver or other parts. I was told it was a chemical reaction between the receiver and the bluing solution. That and the too hot bluing solution. Wasn't the Parker Hale model 1200 in 308 or 7.62 Nato target rifles a Santa Barbara action?. And the rumor was going on about the actions being soft as in regards to heat treating?. Frank
 

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... the rumor was going on about the actions being soft as in regards to heat treating?. Frank
Rumor. Probably vestigial from when Spanish SR Mausers were chambered in 7.62x51 and fed .308 ammo. You don't get cracked receivers from them being soft. The loading gates on many older Ruger Blackhawks turns a plum color over time. There are many causes of a purple hue from bluing. All I'm saying is that the SB receivers that were overly hard were often found to display a purple color. They didn't get overly hard from the salt bath being too hot. I rebarreled a good many SB actions and never found one to be soft nor show any signs of setback.
 

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Tear it down and there will be a proof mark or origin of manufacturer on the rifle that will answer the question. Now...no where in the discussion above did anyone say this rifle would be suspect of being unsafe to shoot and tons of these rifles were sold during 60's. They and their kin from Parker Hale, HC Higgins, Montgomery Ward were great value and sturdy hunting rifles.
Heym is another maker that provided barreled actions for this market.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
full length photo of rifle, barrel and sights!
would be nice!

they didn't! use SB post 1963 back,
they use military receivers. from war inventory's stored in tunnels once govt. they bought the facility.
later the test fire tunnel.
after 63 some where in the following years SB were used!
over hardened purplish receivers ive also heard or too hot bluing solutions ?
when i wrote the factory ENG. concerning safari delux model I have.
pre SB.yes!
Company didn't have that info saying, ww2, records?
and, when ever the inventory of captured stored rifles ran out date?
Here is a full length
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FWIW, I picked up one of these a decade ago and rebarreled it in 6,5x55 for my oldest boy who was 8 at the time. The '06 was a bit much for him but a 100 grain 6,5mm bullet at 2600 fps was just the ticket. It has served him well.
 

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John,

I don't recall Parker Hale using Zastava actions. Not that it may not have happened but I've never come across a Parker Hale that used a Zastava action. If you got a pic, I'd love to see it. As for soft SB actions, the issues I'm familiar with are the exact opposite; actions too hard. Early on, SB flame hardened their actions in much the same manner that plagued Springfield armory, they eyeballed them. Actions too hard typically display a purple hue.

The OP's particular rifle is neat in that the blind magazine sheds a goodly amount of weight and makes for a handier rifle than your average commercial Mauser variant.
My information not a matter of available scholarly citations for sure! :) Rather just rumors of old. Yet with notation, differing-sourced sufficiently to consider "credible" until proven 'not'.
First, only to reaffirm my understanding concerning the "soft receiver" dialogue and discussions about some bolt "set back". Can't speak to the absolute truth of the assertions. But the fact of such allegations over time; they are 'out there'

As for Parker-Hale the matter of them long engaged with utilization of the Santa Barbara action, I do believe an established fact as well as some 'tiff' alleged possibly related to "soft action".
PH allegedly abandoning SB temporarily, perhaps more on the fly as a contract with Interarms/Zastava to manufacture the Whitworth brand Zastava action rifle. This gets convoluted. But essentially that Zastava provided complete barreled actions for PH controlled Manchester location shops doing the stocking & associated final fabrication. (Note that Whitworth name associated with & controlled by PH used prior in the muzzle loading repros.) So that was the Zastava connect. There were also alleged, both push-pull production problems as well as certain British proofing law difficulties early on. My disclaimer, all these memories as 'most fresh', no less than quarter century old. That in an eight decades aged mind...
And now, what was I saying... :) :) :)

Best! John
 

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My information not a matter of available scholarly citations for sure! :) Rather just rumors of old. Yet with notation, differing-sourced sufficiently to consider "credible" until proven 'not'.
First, only to reaffirm my understanding concerning the "soft receiver" dialogue and discussions about some bolt "set back". Can't speak to the absolute truth of the assertions. But the fact of such allegations over time; they are 'out there'

As for Parker-Hale the matter of them long engaged with utilization of the Santa Barbara action, I do believe an established fact as well as some 'tiff' alleged possibly related to "soft action".
PH allegedly abandoning SB temporarily, perhaps more on the fly as a contract with Interarms/Zastava to manufacture the Whitworth brand Zastava action rifle. This gets convoluted. But essentially that Zastava provided complete barreled actions for PH controlled Manchester location shops doing the stocking & associated final fabrication. (Note that Whitworth name associated with & controlled by PH used prior in the muzzle loading repros.) So that was the Zastava connect. There were also alleged, both push-pull production problems as well as certain British proofing law difficulties early on. My disclaimer, all these memories as 'most fresh', no less than quarter century old. That in an eight decades aged mind...
And now, what was I saying... :) :) :)

Best! John
John, you said it yourself here, "My information not a matter of available scholarly citations for sure! :) Rather just rumors of old."

Yes, just that, rumors. I am sure that, over time, you will find a "soft" receiver for any manufacturer. On the whole however, I've not come across one documented case of an SB receiver being soft. And, until I do, it is just that, "Rumors!"

Same for PH using Zastava supplied actions. Again, just speculation. It is well known and factual that PH used Santa Barbara commercial 98 pattern actions.
 

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If it is a Western Field 750 A, it is a Mossberg Model 42 using one of the Mauser 98 Actions, according to the Gun-data.com Montgomery Ward Firearms page.
I think you are reading that chart wrong seeing as the Mossberg Model 42 is a 22 lr.

Additionally, that chart is very much incomplete as Wards sold several different models of the Western Field brand that used Commercial 98 actions made by differing manufacturers. The Model EJN-757 being built on an FN Made Commercial 98 action and other models being built upon Zastava made Standard length 98 actions as well as another model being made on a Zastava Intermediate 98 action.
 

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John, you said it yourself here, "My information not a matter of available scholarly citations for sure! :) Rather just rumors of old."

Yes, just that, rumors. I am sure that, over time, you will find a "soft" receiver for any manufacturer. On the whole however, I've not come across one documented case of an SB receiver being soft. And, until I do, it is just that, "Rumors!"

Same for PH using Zastava supplied actions. Again, just speculation. It is well known and factual that PH used Santa Barbara commercial 98 pattern actions.
Hi z1r! In presenting material of controversy, I'm in the habit of being open about "sources" or lack of. Such in matters I haven't conjured in perhaps quarter century as investigating a couple of nice Zastava marked "Whitworth" rifles acquired. That as doing some backgrounding of them in early nineties. I do recall information satisfying my curiosity re Parker Hale as "usual suspect". I don't recall my source for that! Nor efforts to document in those "pre-Internet days/sources. Such partially while in England in mid-nineties. With my interest in FN commercial mausers, the matter of Santa Barbara, something tending to get my attention as in dialogue. I've noted such metallurgty allegations sufficiently to form the opinion of "probably factual". That said, rumors without foundation can be vicious and pervasive. The'other' issue, my certitude is high, my "certainty" simply as "more probable than not", concerning the PH firm contractor on the Whitworth rifles "assembled in England". notably whilest bearing no Brit proofs!
Ref to soft SB actions:

"@d4xycrq, The model you got was a Parker-Hale "Midland" model rifle, this is the probably the rarest of the PH rifles and was built on a proprietary push feed action which used a modified Springfield bolt. The other mode;s where either built on a sporterised .303 or mauser action, both military and commercial mausers where used and came from germany (the military mausers) as well as Spain, FN, CZ or Zastava in Serbia."

The bottom line for me is that Parker Hale was something of a "jack of all trades" rifle manufacturer. They sporterized both mausers and Enfields. Their "Midland" brand rifle for instance, a weird combo of surplus M1903 Springfield bolts and apparently investment cast receiver from ??? source. Sam Cummins Interarmsco had a huge warehouse in Manchester, England, notably the city locale of his Interarms "Whitworth" (Parker Hale historically owned name), Zastava mauser rifles, Interarms didn't build rifles there, PH had "manufacturing" capability and licensing. Further "guns passing through "under bond', needn't be English proofed. I'd suggest sufficient info to move the matter to "probability" status, to be disproven". What's your evidence to contrary? :) :) :)

Anyway, time to put this PH issue to bed from my perspective. I'll leave the matter with just another "curiosity"...

Parker Hale 1200 Bolt Action Blued

Best & Stay Safe!
John
 

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Whitworth was the name of a rifle made by Parker Hale back in the day. When Interarms started selling their Mk X rifles, remember that the then Yugoslavia, a communist country, could not import rifles into the US. So, Sam Cummings, had them sent to Manchester England whereupon they became eligible for direct import to the US. The Whitworth rifle was noted for its quality and accuracy so the name was cleverly applied to the Higher Grade Interarms rifles, usually fitted with cut checkered walnut stocks and higher grade polished high gloss bluing. FWIW, Parker Hale was base in Birmingham England, not Manchester. Even if PH had assembled the rifles, they did not market them as Parker Hale rifles so, saying PH used Zastava actions would be a stretch.

At best, this would be more like High Standard installing their barrels on to FN actions for Sears & Roebuck for the JC Higgins brand rifles. High Standard never marketed these rifles as theirs. So, would you then say High Standard used FN actions for their rifles? Don't think so. Instead, Sears used High Standard to assemble their FN based rifles.

That link to the PH 1200, well, that's not even a Mauser action? But, PH did use SB actions in their 1200's. Just goes to show, you can't trust everything you read on the internet. Clearly the seller doesn't know that the 1200 was based off a Mauser 98 type action.

Bottom line is, you are trying to pass your suppositions off as fact. Fact not supported.
 
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