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Platinum Bullet member
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Discussion Starter #1
Ken Elks is ready with the first of his 2 part set of books on Japanese Ammunition. I have a copy coming & hope to have it by this weekend. His first work is probably harder to find than Johnson's bayonet book, but is a great reference to have. Now, I'm sure this will be even better! Cost is $55 and you can reach Ken at this address.
[email protected]
 

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A-dogs, thanks for the valuable information. I will send an e-mail asking for a copy asap !
 

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Adogs, thanks for passing the word. Have just sent email to him about ordering the book.
 

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Dang it - now I'm going to have to order yet ANOTHER book! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just received my copy & it looks great! It's soft spiral bound with laminated front & back covers. This is part 1 that covers pistol, rifle and machine gun ammunition up to (but not including) 20mm. Has lots of great color photos of rounds and their packaging. Some are boxes I've never seen before and even one that is mine! Even has Murata ammo covered. This is a must have reference!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Part 2 (coming out next spring) will cover the larger stuff.
 

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Received my copy today and can only echo what Adogs has to offer on this book. A great addition to any collector’s reference library.
 

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I received my copy a couple of days ago. Everyone has to have a copy of this if he/she is a serious Japanese militaria collector. Really great book!

Frank
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Just think what it will be worth on e-bay in a few years! His original work is much rarer than Johnson's bayonet book & I've never seen a copy for sale since I bought mine.
 

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Kryptonite member
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Bought my copy from Jerry Price, came earlier in the week. Great book, but was disappointed in the T 38 section that, as usual in books/articles on Japanese ammunition, describes MG ammo as "reduced charge." The book does not note that while there was less powder in the case, it was a different power that gave the projectile (bullet) the same velocity as the earlier rifle ammunition, this Ed Libby who has examined the "reduced charge" vs regular rifle ammo told me.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Bought my copy from Jerry Price, came earlier in the week. Great book, but was disappointed in the T 38 section that, as usual in books/articles on Japanese ammunition, describes MG ammo as "reduced charge." The book does not note that while there was less powder in the case, it was a different power that gave the projectile (bullet) the same velocity as the earlier rifle ammunition, this Ed Libby who has examined the "reduced charge" vs regular rifle ammo told me.
Well, if you had told him about these findings, he would have known about them. An author can only go by what's been seen or learned so far.
 

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Even I had read about the 'reduced charge ammo' being a powder change; was it here(Gunboards) or in Banzai?

Authors do have some responsibility to keep up too; though I would be the last one to throw stones at anyone who would undertake a Japanese ammo book!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Rodent, I think you're, maybe, being a bit overly critical. I just re-read the part in the new book about "G" marked 6.5mm ammo (page 37 & 38), and I think he covered it pretty well from what he had to go by. To know that a lesser quanity of the new powder resulted in the same results would have required some ballistics testing. I'd be curious to know how accurate such testing would be with ammo this old??
Don't let the old crusty one dissuade you - it's a damn fine piece of work. His original booklet didn't cover the package markings at all & this one has a good number of package markings (many in color).
One box label has me puzzled. It's at the bottom of page 60. The box is marked as being for the T-97 tank MG using T-92 armor-piercing bullets. Yet, it has the reddish or pink circle in the upper left hand corner that always meant "ball" ammo to me before? Why not a black circle?? I've always thought this colored circle corresponded to the color of the casemouth seal.
 

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Noted a problem in the T-38 section, it still refers to MG ammo as reduced charge. Fails to mention that while there is less powder, it's a different powder than in the earlier infantry rifles and the new powder produces the same velocities. Not an arror, but not a through explanation. Most think "reduced charge" means reduced pressure. Thie information on new powder/pressures comes from Ed Libby who has resesrched the "reduced charge" myth thoroughly.

The book appears to be an excellent reference, but when I'm reading something I know 'zip' about I hate to find an omissison or error (like in a number of the Osprey (sp?) books. Makes you wonder if anything else is "out of kilter?"
 

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The El Olde is very correct. The G does not stand for "reduced load" but is probably an initial from glycerin or guanidine, the additional charge ingredients nitro-glycerin or nitro-guanidine added onto the new powder charge.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Some documentation on this would be great to put this issue to rest. I can't help but wonder - if the 'G' had no real significance to the soldier in the field, why stamp it on the box? Would it affect the choice of ammo to be picked up? Japanese ammo was way overcomplicated!
 

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This cartridge collector has been collecting Japanese ammunition for sixty five years and I consider him very knowledgeable person when it comes to ammunition in general.( He served in the Pacific during WW2). His name is John Scott and lives in Pgh. Pa. If you want a "qualified "answer,I'm sure he can give it to you. Maybe
A-Dog can call since he started this thread. 724 327 5565 Hope this helps, Joe
 

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Lack of headstamps

Some documentation on this would be great to put this issue to rest. I can't help but wonder - if the 'G' had no real significance to the soldier in the field, why stamp it on the box? Would it affect the choice of ammo to be picked up? Japanese ammo was way overcomplicated!
Right, so complicated they didn't (usually?) use headstamps; I guess to protect the guilty.

But why? Manufacturing time saver?
 
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