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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought this rifle from a co-worker who was selling some of his elderly fathers guns.
I bought some 22 caliber's and this Arisaka rifle that I identified as a type 38 after doing my own online searching.
All numbers match but no bayonet.
Where do you folks find your ammo? This takes 6.5x50 correct? I was told I should have a gun smith inspect before using.
I found this other Arisaka that is rough condition with its bayonet. I plan on restoring the bayonet and placing it on the good rifle.
 

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don't take it to a gunsmith imo it will be a waste of your time most gunsmiths will tell you a arisaka is unsafe . lots of rumors about these guns. if you feel scared to shoot it just do the old string tire trick.
 

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Where do you folks find your ammo? This takes 6.5x50 correct?
The Arisaka type 38 ammo is typically listed as 6.5x50 Japanese in the online drop down boxes. Unfortunately, it looks like it has been discontinued by both Norma and Hornady. Midway had some of the alaska 156gr hunting ammo but it looks like that is gone now also. Maybe one of the smaller producers will have a run soon.
 

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I was told I should have a gun smith inspect before using.
Usually if you have a matching bolt it is very unlikely that a type 38 is unsafe to fire. However, sometimes, the chambers were reamed for another cartridge (and not marked as such, ie 6.5x257 Roberts was a somewhat popular mod in the 1950s.) In my opinion you should take some type of appropriate precautions to verify the chamber. Carefully visually inspect with a known correct cartridge to the chamber for fit and remotely firing from a lanyard is probably a good idea. Then inspect the fired brass for signs of pressure and such.

I'm an amateur at this so someone else jump in to correct me, but this is what I expect to find on a fired case (new factory case, (fireformed reloads will headspace off of the shoulder)):

The fired brass should have a slight bulge (and may have bit of a shiny ring) about 1/3rd of an inch from the base, but otherwise look pretty much the same. The base may get some marks from the extractor and the primer may flatten some, but you should not see primer cratering or extension and the rim should not be distorted or gouged. This cartridge headspaces off of the semi rim, so rim damage probably means something is amiss with the headspace and your bolt. The case above the bulge stretches forward during firing until the shoulder rolls out and contacts the forward chamber, so you might see what looks like light stretch scratches along the case taking some of the shine off. The shoulder and neck should look almost like new without any crimping, bulging, or cracks. The length might be shorter or just very slightly longer. The crimp may or may not still be slightly visible and the neck will have opened enough that you can slide a new bullet into it without friction. Anything else I would try to get some hi res photos and post for others to help you with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the helpful information. I'll definitely check to see if this was reamed for another cartridge.

I've never heard of the old string tire trick. But any ways I do not see any thing to be scared about, the gun appears completely okay.
If I ever find a extra Arisaka stock I'd like to make a wall hanger out my damaged rifle. Was told to pour lead in the barrel so that no one will ever fire it. Was damaged in a fire 40 years ago.
 
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