Gunboards Forums banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just got this in the mail today: I've been looking for a 1917 in as original condition as possible that was likely a trench veteran, this one is... pretty close to original (original blue at least) but the markings have an interesting story to tell. From what i've seen all parts are Eddystone (barrel, receiver, front sight base, front band, rear handguard ring, trigger, safety cover, bolt, bolt shroud, butt plate trap, follower, follower spring and stock-although there is mysteriously a W stamped on the in the barrel channel) except the triggerguard (Winchester) and rear sight assembly (Remington). Bore is bright and shiny. Receiver is 6-18 and barrel is 5-18 so likely original.

The markings I've been able to decipher are the original US eagles and flaming bombs where they should be, Canadian army broad arrow on the stock and the CAI import mark on the barrel. The biggest mystery was the post front sight where the blade should be, marked with 060. From my research and these markings this appears to be an Eddystone sent to Canadian as a lend lease (red paint barely still present on forward handguard and stock), then sent to Denmark where it equipped the home guard as a Gevar M53 (and the front sight was swapped for better accuracy) before CAI imported it back here with a bolt that has a non-matching serial number on it. Very interesting story to tell on a pretty darn original rifle (for one of these). Looks a leeetle too nice to have been in the trenches but date-wise it could have made Meuse-Argonne so I'm going to let my imagination have this one, excited to shoot it once lockdown is lifted as I hear these run very well. Mechanics seem very good and I would say it has ~70% of its beautiful original blue.


Take a look at the photos I'll welcome any hive mind knowledge on this one, especially where to find info about its Danish service, and for those of you wondering I got this for $800 including shipping, seemed good to me for today's market.

















Sensitive content, not recommended for those under 18 Show Content

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
567 Posts
Just a thought but M1917's issued to the British Home Guard during WW2 had red paint added in key places to denote .30 and prevent attempts to use .303. If yours went to Canada perhaps the same was done there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
Got pictures of my Dads Training company in the Navy pre-WW2 using 1917's. He later went back in as a SeaBee when WW2 started. Landed in N. Africa.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
That's a Canadian issued stock. Arrow inside C. Very nice!
I think that was stamped on the original American stock since it is an original Eddystone. Yeah a super well-travelled gun that you can tell the story of from the markings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,605 Posts
Nice Model of 1917, I really like these rifles. Most probably supplied to Canada prior to our entry into WWII. Typical Canadian markings, including remnants of red pain on fore end. These had a red band painted on them to differentiate them from the P14s.

As I am stuck in Canasa for a few weeks, I think I'll contact the Museum at the Royal Westminster regiment here in BC and see what records they have on the deliveries of the 1917s across the border.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
240 Posts
Nice Model of 1917, I really like these rifles. Most probably supplied to Canada prior to our entry into WWII. Typical Canadian markings, including remnants of red pain on fore end. These had a red band painted on them to differentiate them from the P14s.

As I am stuck in Canasa for a few weeks, I think I'll contact the Museum at the Royal Westminster regiment here in BC and see what records they have on the deliveries of the 1917s across the border.
These rifles are well documented in the C.S. Ferris book of the "17.
They were purchased out right by the Canadians before the war, as opposed to later lend lease to Britain.
Another Canadian/ Danish trait you may find is the follower is milled to allow bolt closure on an empty mag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
These rifles are well documented in the C.S. Ferris book of the "17.
They were purchased out right by the Canadians before the war, as opposed to later lend lease to Britain.
Another Canadian/ Danish trait you may find is the follower is milled to allow bolt closure on an empty mag.
The ferris book is in the mail, I was hoping it would document these. the mag follower is milled which I really like. I was hoping for a WWI vet in close to original condition when I bought this and I think I got that plus much more, I hear these are very accurate with the front sight post and look forward to shooting it, it may be my most accurate rifle!
 

·
Platinum Bullet Member
Joined
·
52,414 Posts
These rifles are well documented in the C.S. Ferris book of the "17.
They were purchased out right by the Canadians before the war, as opposed to later lend lease to Britain.
Another Canadian/ Danish trait you may find is the follower is milled to allow bolt closure on an empty mag.
didn't the Danish rifles also have a notch milled in the top front of the reciever?

or was that Norwegian?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
These rifles are well documented in the C.S. Ferris book of the "17.
They were purchased out right by the Canadians before the war, as opposed to later lend lease to Britain.
Another Canadian/ Danish trait you may find is the follower is milled to allow bolt closure on an empty mag.
The ferris book came today and while it mentions the danish rifles, It doesn't show the front sight post at all, is there another source for these variations?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,724 Posts
If for any reason, you have to change out that front sight a sight insert or blade off a #4 British service rifle will fit. As was told to me on the British rifle forum here. The upright part of the sight is standard on all sights. The base thickness plus the height of the blade is the actual sight insert. If you look on a British rifle front sight you'll see some numbers. one set will be the height of the sight. Sometimes you will see P.H. for Parker Hale which manufactured that particular sight. Haven't seen such a nice U.S. Model of 1917 in years. Had a good one but someone offered me an insane amount of money fot. Now the only U.S. Enfield I own is a sporter. Bought all the metal and complete barreled action for $59 many years ago. Had it bead blasted,drilled and tapped for scope bases, weaver steel Grand Slam bases and Burris Zee rings. Then bead blasted and blued. Bluing came out almost black. Cut down Canadian Arrow within C marking on the wood. Have to glass bed it prior to shooting it. 22" barrel. Still a heavy rifle despite loosing all that weight. Wouldn't have spent the money in the first place except the barrel is almost mint. This was done on a Winchester action. Have another Winchester 06 action to play around with. Frank
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
240 Posts
The ferris book came today and while it mentions the danish rifles, It doesn't show the front sight post at all, is there another source for these variations?
Well I thought that was mentioned in Ferris as well. I researched mine years ago from internet forum sources as well, the "roll pin" front sight was explained as a replacement by the Danes as a more visible sight custom made for the rifle.
They had shooting competitions among the home guard which drove this alteration.
Try Milsurps.com or Jouster, or here, for old threads using the above roll pin front sight reference in a search.
My mostly untouched early Winchester has the windage hold chart still attached to the left butt stock from the Danes.
You have a well traveled, and well maintained piece of history there. Keep digging!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Well I thought that was mentioned in Ferris as well. I researched mine years ago from internet forum sources as well, the "roll pin" front sight was explained as a replacement by the Danes as a more visible sight custom made for the rifle.
They had shooting competitions among the home guard which drove this alteration.
Try Milsurps.com or Jouster, or here, for old threads using the above roll pin front sight reference in a search.
My mostly untouched early Winchester has the windage hold chart still attached to the left butt stock from the Danes.
You have a well traveled, and well maintained piece of history there. Keep digging!
YEah, not what I was looking for when I bought it but it is SO beautiful. I was looking for a well used WWI eddystone hahaha but dang this is so nice It might get a bonus (non-WWI pure) slot in my collection like my m39
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Range report, it shoots REAL good, I on a 2 foot spread on a rock at 490 yards off the shoulder while seated, and I'm not that good!
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top