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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recieved this unbelievably rusted monster last month, complete with a cut down barrel (sans front sight). I thought it would be a good challenge; it is. It was so bad that I figured it couldn't hurt to try the electrolysis method of rust removal, so I did.
So, now I have to figure out what I should do with it: sporter style, military bubba-monster, rebarrled restoration ($$) or... what?
What finish would any of you choose, given the pitting; paint? Duracoat? Bluing would look horrid, I should think, over the pitting.
The bore is surprisingly intact, with one patch of deep pitting mid bore. The end of the barrel is cut off cock-eyed and will need truing up and crowning. It will also need a front sight, unless tapped for scope.
Perhaps I should just use it as a tomato stake.....
I'd like to hear what you all would do with this beast......

Cheers,

DB
 

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Sometimes the patch of pitting found at mid bore, (Probably a two groove barrel) will be only a couple of ten thousandths deep but look a mile deep.

I polished out a similar mid bore patch and the bore is still reasonably tight at .304 land to land.

Lapping is the best way to go, though I managed okay using a tightly fitted leather patch tied down on a jag with tabs on either side acting to turn with the grooves.

If its a multi groove bore , four or five, Lead lapping is the only good way to go.

A forum member recently posted that some very good condition two groove barrels were still available from Numrich.

I see no harm in finishing this sort of botched job out as a sporting rifle. The Enfield actions make great sporters.
I use one because a hand injury makes operating other action types rapidly difficult and a bit painful.

PS
Better make sure this action hasn't been in a house fire. It has that look to it. If the springs are still good the temper of the metal is probably still okay.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
GunnerSam,
I thought house fire also, when I first saw it. The springs are fine, and I couldn't find any soot or charred material in any of the seams.
I'm interested in the lapping technique, although I've never done anything like that; it is a two groove bore.....

Thanks for your input,

DB
 

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GunnerSam,
I thought house fire also, when I first saw it. The springs are fine, and I couldn't find any soot or charred material in any of the seams.
I'm interested in the lapping technique, although I've never done anything like that; it is a two groove bore.....

Thanks for your input,

DB
Well I polished out the rough and uneven spots of my two groove bore using the fitted suede leather patch I mentioned and first ran a strip of one thousand grit silicon carbide paper through the bore, followed by two thousandth grit emery paper, then laid strips of muslin soaked with a paste of fine white polishing compound a mechanic gave me years ago back and forth till it shown like a mirror.
I didn't touch the grooves at all and kept the strips thin so they didn't contact the edges of the grooves so they stayed sharp.
I wouldn't suggest this as the best method though. I had a lot of time on my hands and just tried this as an experiment. It takes a fine touch.
One thing you don't want to do is leave any low spots.
When finished a tight patch should move smoothly up the bore without any variation in resistence as it goes.
When I fitted the leather patch I cut slots in the edges to tie it tightly to the grooves in the jag. The edges of the patch I mashed down and trimmed till they rode smoothly in the grooves.

I used a one piece rod with a guide trimmed to fit the chamber to keep it centered.

Lead lapping generally requires casting a lead plug onto a jag inside the bore itself. There are instructions on how to do this , perhaps you can find them on the net. If not I'll see if I can remember the exact procedure, then try to post it step by step.
Lead lapping is the best method, a method used by the best barrel makers before button and hammer rifled bores came along.

Two groove .303 barrels seem to vary somewhat in land and groove diameters, some are very loose to begin with.
The Hornady .312 bullets compensate for loose bores very nicely, and have proven highly accurate in every rifle I've tried them in.

I get consistent sub MOA groups so I must have done something right.

PS
A decent article on lead lapping.
http://www.shootingtimes.com/gunsmithing/st_lappingbarrel_200805/
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
GunnerSam,

Thanks for the info, and the instruct.s; I printed out the info from that website and will try to give it a try sometime next week.

Thanks,

DB
 

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82ndpara: I saw that auction. Reminded me of a similar one I got a few years ago. Mine was almost new and someone cut the barrel, but machined it to accept a stock front sight.
I had some Bubba'd and cracked parts and voila: A little baby Enfield. I call it an "Edfield".
The last pic is with a full sized No.4. EDINOH.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Now that's what I'm talking about!

Two great examples of what good ingenuity can come up with! Yeah, when I saw this old guy all crusted up I thought "that looks like a challenge, I'll give it a shot". But once I got the rust pretty much removed, I'm left saying OK, now what?....

Littlecleo: If the old bastard is accurate enough (the rifle I mean...), I might consider settingit up as a target rifle. I have to figure out how the bore is going to pan out. I actually rigged up an annode inside the bore when I did the electrolysis and you wouldn't believe what came out of it... Black, brown, orange and dark green foam was just oozing out for ten minutes.

Edinoh: I just saw an auction for a little guy just like yours, I loved it, but it went past my monthly budget (if I really have one...). If I can figure out how to mill the end of the barrel to fit a stock front sight, I would be interested in doing something like that....

Thanks for the ideas and the pics guys!

DB
 

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Littlecleo: If the old bastard is accurate enough (the rifle I mean...), I might consider settingit up as a target rifle. I have to figure out how the bore is going to pan out. I actually rigged up an annode inside the bore when I did the electrolysis and you wouldn't believe what came out of it... Black, brown, orange and dark green foam was just oozing out for ten minutes. DB
I know where you're coming from, the bore on mine was pretty questionable on first inspection, but after a lot of scrubbing, and electronic bore cleaning I started to see rifling! The bore had some minor pitting mostly in the grooves, but after 20 rounds of FMJ ammo, I started shooting 2" groups @ 100 yards from the bench, so I called it good. It has become my main deer rifle the last few seasons, and definately unique.
 
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