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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I just got a box of parts...

With an exception of few like the safety and magazine catch, they are all Inland. The CMP barreled receiver is Inland 5266xxx so 3rd quarter of 44. There is also a parkerized flat bolt, which I know is wrong so I may want to change that, but all the parts are accounted for according to a check with Numrich parts schematic. The sights is a later rebuild style one, so is the front band.

So, to assemble this jigsaw puzzle... Can this be done without special tools, like the bolt tool or the piston nut tool? Do i need to stake the piston nut?

Also, any good videos or guides for this little project?
 

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It is not impossible to put the bolt together without the tool. I have done it myself at least a few times The only 'tool' I really needed was a small screwdriver to hold the spring-loaded button to the rear while installing the extractor. Be sure to assemble the bolt somewhere where you won't lose the spring and button (and/or the ejector) if you lose control of it. You can use a slave pin to hold the ejector in the rifle while installing the extractor, but you do need to watch things when the extractor shaft pushes the slave pin past the ejector.

To this day, I do not own a Carbine Bolt Tool.

You can quickly make a piston nut tool by grinding the last 1/8" or so off every other flat of a 5/16" standard socket. Leave the 'corners' as square as possible. Due to alignment issues the socket works best with as small a wrench as you can find. I use my Chapman screwdriver set with the socket (the added leverage provided by the ratchet handle helps a lot with a tight nut)..

You will likely need the tool to get the nut off if it hasn't been removed before.

You do not need to stake the piston nut, but you do need to be sure you screw it down tight. I was shooting with a guy last year who had the piston nut back out on him while he was shooting..
 

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If the bolt is completely disassembled spend the $15 bucks and get a repro tool it will save you time and aggravation. While you are at it get the piston nut tool to keep from buggering the nut as you install it, use a small amount of blue lock tire on assembly. On front and rear sights use a non marking drift, I use brass and wipe the color off with a rag and Break free.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So I got a tool kit from numrich , both the bolt kit and piston nut wrench, $30.. better than damaging stuff.

I do have a question about the bolt thou. At that serial ,should I look for a round bolt ?

Also , still looking for some sort of article on order of assembly , and assembly of the whole thing .
 

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I recently got an M1 garand that was a CMP gun. It came with a manual for the M1 that had all the info for field strip, along with full disassembly/reassembly. Maybe the CMP offered the same for carbines when they sold them? I don't know how you might go about to find one, but maybe it would be a place to start.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ohh, I got the books and stuff , know where what goes all fine , just seeing if there is a sequence , tricks, , that’s all. I can just do reverse of a strip , sure .

I recently got an M1 garand that was a CMP gun. It came with a manual for the M1 that had all the info for field strip, along with full disassembly/reassembly. Maybe the CMP offered the same for carbines when they sold them? I don't know how you might go about to find one, but maybe it would be a place to start.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Here is the bolt that I have. Any thoughts? Just use it, or look for a round bolt to make it look more correct for the production date?

3751015
 

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For assembly instructions and how to insure everything is right, I strongly recommend the Kuhnhausen Shop Manual.
This is not just old Ordnance manuals recycled, it's all new information by a Master gunsmith who wrote it as a training aid for his gunsmithing students.
This covers everything in deep detail and can save you money and grief.
This is money very well spent.......


If you don't want the very best, there are the US Field Manuals which cover the Carbines, but not nearly in the deep detail of the Shop Manual.
NOTE the info at the top of the page on what password and username to use to get into the site........

 

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Here is the bolt that I have. Any thoughts? Just use it, or look for a round bolt to make it look more correct for the production date?

View attachment 3751015
Just go with USGI serviceable parts, especially if you already have them. I'd advise against going down the 'correct for the production date' rabbit hole. Parts are way more expensive and you'd end up paying out way more than it'd be worth in the end. It is what it is. Just enjoy it as a shooter. Still has a lot of value in today's market.

Sent from my SM-G973U1 using Tapatalk
 

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It is up to you, but 99% of the Carbines (well, maybe 98%) I see have the round bolts. Having a flat bolt on your Carbine would kinda set it off from being just another Carbine.

I also have zero enthusiasm for 'correcting' US military arms to their production date.

Parts were revised during the various production runs, usually for pretty good reasons. Personally I would prefer to have the most recent (thus theoretically the best) parts I could find.
 

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You have parts....use them! Changing bolts or bands or whatever is just going to give you different parts. Is the barrel assembled to the receiver? If not I have the tools to install it...you pay postage both ways and they are heavy. There are so few parts to a Carbine this is an afternoon project, also there is no sequence to follow, start with the trigger housing group and then the bolt as they are the two units with the most parts. The plunger on the bolt has a step in it make sure it is turned to lock it in or boing!!! The first chance it gets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for the offer! Barrel and receiver are already together. They were a CMP assembly the previous owner bought, in very good condition. The receiver is Inland and serial puts it on 3rd quarter of 44. All the other parts he put together are also Inland, including the flat bolt I have in the picture above. I got the rest of the parts from Numrich including the bolt assembly tool as well as gas piston nut tool, so I'm good there. I also just got the No-Go and Field headspace gauges.

Yes, the only reason for me to look for a round bolt it to make it look more original, like it was when made in 44. No other reason. With all of the above, including the stuff from Numrich, I am still under $750 into this Carbine, so I think I'll just stop there and enjoy it as is when I put it together. I can always get an IO round bolt later.

You have parts....use them! Changing bolts or bands or whatever is just going to give you different parts. Is the barrel assembled to the receiver? If not I have the tools to install it...you pay postage both ways and they are heavy. There are so few parts to a Carbine this is an afternoon project, also there is no sequence to follow, start with the trigger housing group and then the bolt as they are the two units with the most parts. The plunger on the bolt has a step in it make sure it is turned to lock it in or boing!!! The first chance it gets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Finally had the time to put it together. Not bad for little over $750

3765182
 
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