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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I picked this up on a whim. Now trying to figure out what I have. I was told it was in .43 Spanish, but I am not so sure as it appears to be chambered for a straight cartridge case.
The tang does not have any visible markings, but I think it may have been scrubbed, under a glass it looks like it was once marked.

Very few visible markings on this carbine. The FB on top is about it.
Any thoughts on what country used this, value?

What is the logic behind both a carbine ring and a sling? The rear swivel is too far forward on the butt for the sling to be practical
anyway.

thanks, runner
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Few more pictures
 

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I had one of these as well, same (lack of) markings, just "FB" and both carbine ring and sling.
I was informed that it was indeed re-chambered from .43 Spanish to .43 Spanish Reformado. I understand “FB” stands for Freire & Brull, the two Spanish military that developed the .43 Reformado.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I had one of these as well, same (lack of) markings, just "FB" and both carbine ring and sling.
I was informed that it was indeed re-chambered from .43 Spanish to .43 Spanish Reformado. I understand “FB” stands for Freire & Brull, the two Spanish military that developed the .43 Reformado.
Is there a source for brass and dies for .43 Spanish Reformed? I bought this to shoot.

thanks, runner
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have two reformando rifles. The bore size is .446, not the usual .439. Standard cases can be fire-formed into the reformando cases. Anneal the necks so they will not crack. Slug your bore to make sure.
I have read a couple sources that said the Spanish did not increase the bore size when converting to reformado, just reamed the chambers and loaded a larger diameter bullet. Apparently they felt the original lead bullet was undersized and hurt accuracy. In any case I will check my bore and see what it measures.

Were you able to find reloading dies for .43 Reformado, or do you use .43 spanish dies and "fire-form" cases each time?

thanks, runner
 

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Cuban irregular cavalry used rolling block carbines during the Spanish-American War, 1898-99. They were chambered for the Reformado. Bannerman's buyers in Cuba bought a million or more Reformado cartridges in 1899 along with a bunch of 1893 Mausers in 7mm. I remember seeing crates of loose rounds priced at a penny a piece in surplus stores back in the 1960s. It's a neat carbine.
Dan in Texas
 
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