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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'd rather focus on repairing the stock than how it got this way, but the short version of the story is bad milsurp ammo, pierced primer, hot gas and bits of metal on the shooter's face, stuck bolt and case, damaged bolt head and extractor. The kick seemed double the regular recoil and the rifle was dropped on gravel in the process. Since it's cracked behind the recoil lug, I assume it was caused by recoil and not just the fall from the shooting bench to the ground. Upsetting, indeed, but I'd like to fix it and move on, I rather not dwell on the loss.

The stock is cracked behind the recoil lug, the wood bridge for the trigger group (extremely tough to spread manually), along the top of the stock to a few inches short of the buttstock end/buttplate area, and along the bottom a few inches from the rear of the trigger guard. The crack along the top is longer than the one along the bottom and they do not mate or connect. Neither of the buttstock cracks run all the way to the back end (meaning, it's not split), and they all require quite a bit of force to manually spread open.

My initial idea is to somehow spread the stock as open as I can without further cracking it and somehow inject glue or epoxy, wrapping with elastic until set, then possibly touching up the finish.

I'm not sure how I'd open it up while injecting the glue, or even what type of glue or epoxy to use.

For those with experience in this, would my idea work to stabilize the stock or should I try something else? The rifle was bought with intentions of shooting.

Any suggestions on how to properly fix this are greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance!



Top of Stock


Bottom of Stock behind trigger guard




Shop towel to show/spread the crack
 

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First of all, I hope no lasting injuries came about as a result. In my opinion, trying to spread the crack to inject glue/epoxy will be very difficult and will probably make the crack worse. I have fixed similar damage by getting some brass pins from Brownells and using Acraglass. I would recommend countersinking the pins below the wood surface and cut some wooden plugs from a slave stock to Acraglass into the countersunk holes, then sanding flush. You will want to clamp the stock together firmly while the pins/Acraglass dries. You can also stain/dye the pugs to match the finish. With care, you should be able to fix the stock with the repairs being hard to detect. Good luck on your project.
 

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I use regular setting Epoxy - any brand. Acraglass is a bedding compound, not a glue, and hs shrinkage and elasticity characteristics tailored for bedding.

Pinning across the cracks is a necessity and you can hide the pins by using the splinter lifting technique, drilling for the pin under the splinter, epoxying it in and then gluing the splinter back down and refinishing around it. Done right it is invisible and I know of some very expensive shotguns where this was done.

You can try and get some glue in the crack, but be sure to wrap it with an inner tube or elastic, or clamp with a rubber pad, and carefully scrape away any excess epoxy before it cures 100%, when its still a little flexible. This will give you a smooth surface and rfinishing will hide the crack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you both for the suggestions! I've never tried the pinning, and don't think I have the tools for fabricating plugs to cover up the holes for the pins, but really liked the idea about splintering the wood and drilling underneath that (I may be able to do this). With that said, I'll probably look for a pro who can do it properly and/or look for a replacement stock.

Assuming the replacement stock is of the same vintage (and the hardware looks the same), other that the scope mount cutout, are there any other differences from a non-sniper 91/30 stock? I do realize I may have to play with the inletting as well as bedding.

Is the epoxy like the common two-part epoxy or Loctite that comes in a roll?

Are the brass pins (http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-t...repair-pins/stock-repair-pin-kit-prod617.aspx) available from any brick and mortar stores, or can I substitute long brass screws with the heads cut off?

Thanks again and I hope you have a good evening!
 

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I repaired a similar crack on a M28 and I was able to spread it a little and then I put titebond in a syringe and heated it in hot water and was able to inject it until it ran out the back of the crack and then clamped it and let it set, no pins were used
 

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They always crack for a reason and the typical failure after gluing is for a crack to open up again right next to the original. Pinning prevents this. The inletting should also be checked for areas that are too tight - shrinkage from age will cause cracking - and relieved if necessary, and the area behind the recoil lug reinforced if needed.
 

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I use Loctite 5000lb two part liquid epoxy.

Remember, old time armory Mosin repairs showed the brass pins, they didn't worry about plugs and such.
Do not use Gorilla glue, it expands.
IMO, a repair showing the pins is more "correct" than trying to hide them.
I have more than one Mosin with exposed brass pins as well as brass nails.
I even have a Winchester M75 military stock with brass nails.

I have used #4 and #6 solid brass phillips head screws to repair a crack just like that one, I sold the rifle and don't have pics.
I clamped the split using a c-clamp and a generous amount of blue painters tape as a cushion.
Drill pilots, using toothpick insert epoxy, run the screw in leaving the head and part of the shank above the wood line.
Allow it all to set.
I use a dremmel to cut off the head then file flat with the wood.

If you can get into the crack from the inside, you can drill a hole the length of it and fill it with epoxy as well, this is also an area where a wooden dowel could be used.
I have clamped, drilled, unclamped, cover dowel with epoxy, insert, clamp, allow to dry.

There is a good section on surplusrifleforum where a member has plenty of postings about various fixes and repairs.

My repairs might not be acceptable for some, but IMO they look closer to an original type arsenal repair than trying to hide it.
 

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Do not use Gorilla glue, it expands.
+1 It can become quite a mess. Even the best urethane glues are tricky and may come apart when exposed to some common chemicals and solvents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Guys, thanks for your continued help with this. I've decided I want to pin and epoxy it, but haven't decided if it's something I want to try or send to someone with experience.

Ratman, I wouldn't mind seeing pics of what the buttstocks looked like after your fix. If possible, either post a link or email me a pic or two.

A good week to all!
 

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Again, highly recommend Acraglass and brass pins for a quality repair. Please note the lower left side of the box; yes it is used for bedding but also for stock repairs. I have used it with very good results. In my experience, something else may let go but I would seriously doubt that it will be the Acraglassed part.

 

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Guys, thanks for your continued help with this. I've decided I want to pin and epoxy it, but haven't decided if it's something I want to try or send to someone with experience.

Ratman, I wouldn't mind seeing pics of what the buttstocks looked like after your fix. If possible, either post a link or email me a pic or two.

A good week to all!
I have a couple with arsenal repairs I can take some pics of this weekend.
I have a 28/30 with a nailed fore end of all things, it's hidden by the hand guard but you can just see the brass nails if you look hard enough.

I didn't take any pics of the one I sold, sorry. However, the buyer thought it was an armory repair until I told him otherwise.

Someone is selling a late date M39 on the trader right now that shows an armory repair on the tang, nothing but a slotted screw run into it.

Check out this thread:
http://forums.gunboards.com/showthr...-most-unusual-stock-repair!!&highlight=repair
 

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That's a pretty bad crack. Everything considered, would you be ahead to just get a surplus replacement stock? There are so many Mosins floating around right now that one shouldn't be hard to come by. If you're compelled to fix it, then I'd go with the threaded brass pins and AccraGlas Gel from Brownell's. First, using the supplied drill bits, drill the holes for the pins, then use a little tool like a tiny screwdriver and push as much of the AccraGlas into the holes as possible. Then chuck the smooth end of a rod into your electric drill or heavy duty Dremel and slowly run the rod into the hole until just short of the opposite side. Remove the drill, let it all set up, and then cut off the excess rod sticking out of the entrance side. The rod will push some of the AccraGlas ahead of it and some will come out the opposite side, so you can just sand that down and usually can't see the repair hole on that side. I've repaired many stocks using that system and it makes for a very strong repair. True, some do place a lot of store in hiding the ends of the pins, but I never found them objectionable and think that on older guns they add character. After all, unless you can hide the fact entirely that it was cracked (unlikely) why hide the repair? It was broken, and now it's fixed. My approach might be different on $2k o/u shotgun. Good luck with this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
I'm going back and forth on this...

If I were to buy a replacement stock from a regular, non-sniper, 91-30:

1) Other that the scope mount cut-out on the left hand side of the stock, and possibly adjusting inletting and bedding, what else would I need to do in order for the scoped PU action to drop in?

2) What's the best way to reproduce the curved edges on the stock cut-out for the scope base?

3) The action is dated 1944, what features should I look for in order for it to be "period correct"? (I know I can look for a stock that uses the same sling swivel hardware, but other than that, is there anything else I should look for?)

4) The current stock has what I believe are pressed in metal sleeves or protectors in the sling swivel slots. I've seen stocks for sale without these. Is it easy to remove these pieces from the original stock to install on a replacement stock? I imagine I'd have to loosen it with solvent which could in turn ruin the finish around the slot. I'll try to add pics of the sling slots following the posting.

Thanks again!

Btw, I'd probably still try to fix the original stock, but with a replacement stock I'd probably be up and shooting faster and it should look better.





 

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Taking it point by point:
1) Nothing else that I am aware of. Without the mount I believe the action would drop right in without any fitting. They were made to pretty loose tolerances.
2) There are several devices/tool that will allow you to closely replicate curves. You can find them in comprehensive tool catalogs. But probably the best way would be to just place the removed mount against the side of the replacement stock at the right location and trace around the curves with a sharp pointed pencil. Then remove the wood inside the pencil line up to the inside edge of the pencil line. That should give you a very tight fit, and be cautious in removing any more wood. Make the curves using a cabinet maker's wood rasp. Slowly and gently.
3)Again, nothing that I am aware of unless stampings/markings are important to you.
4) Yes, it can be done, these are very common; but so much easier to buy one that has the metal parts already installed. It really shouldn't be a chore to find one (proper stock) and since the Gunboards Forum has a couple of sections just dedicated to Mosin enthusiasts it might be done right here. You might even turn up a sniper stock. Find the right forum and post your wants.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for the quick reply!

So, if I buy one with the same style swivel slot liner it should be period correct? Is that the easiest way for me to identify a "correct" stock or are there others?
 

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I am not a Mosin collector per se, but I have 9 or 10 of them in various configurations. So I will offer the following, but defer to someone who specifically collects them. First, looking at your photos, all you would have to do to remove the old metal liners from the sling slots of your present stock is to bend one of the metal tabs upward 90 degrees and then push/punch it out through the slot to the other side. Install in the replacement stock in reverse order, but be aware that the metal might crack and break at the bend on the reinstallation. You could probably avoid it breaking by heating it red hot and letting it cool, and that should remove any temper and allow it to bend again---but no guarantee. I would answer your question about the proper time period by saying that I believe it to be correct that if your 1944 rifle has this type of slot liner, buying another stock that looks like yours in all other respects and has this same type of slot liner would be correct for the rifle. I base that upon having a M-44 carbine with the identical type of liners. Going back to our earlier conversation, if you post your photos on any of several of the Gunboards sub-forums and say., "Hey guys, this is what I need" I feel pretty sure you'll get a response.
 

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I have repaired cracks like that successfully using the following method. I clamp the stock using a padded jaw vise or other wood clamp to close the crack up. Next I drill a hole starting from the inlet portion (so that it is not visible from the outside) along the length of the crack and clean out the hole using air or by repeatedly running the drill in and out to remove all the chips. Remove the stock from the vise or clamp. Mix up a suitable portion of good 24 hour type epoxy and start stuffing it into the hole you have drilled. (A syringe may work well for this as well but I have not used one.) A piece of hardwood dowel that is a bit longer than the hole is deep is then pushed into the hole to drive the epoxy in deep and then withdrawn. Stuff more epoxy into the hole and repeat with the dowel. Several time of this and there should be bunches of epoxy in the hole and in the crack. When you feel you have enough epoxy stuffed into the hole/crack, drive the tight fitting dowel into the hole. The drill you used should be sized to make the dowel a good fit and the resulting hydraulic force will drive the epoxy into the crack from the inside out. Place the stock back into the vise or clamp and close the crack up and you should see the epoxy ooze out along the length of the crack. Wipe off the excess and let it cure. When fully hardened, use a sharp chisel to remove the part of the dowel and epoxy that is now in the inlet portion of the stock. Done properly, the repair should be stronger than the wood and invisible from the outside.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Excellent explanation above...thanks!

I'm "talking" to someone who thinks he has a correct replacement stock from a regular 91-30 with escutcheons in place. All I'd need to do is make the mount cut-out. In the short run, I think that's the quickest solution to get me shooting it again...but I will still deal with the current stock.

Now for the bolt head with extractor...

A great weekend to all!
 

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Custom rifles use cross bolts to prevent that type of crack for heavy recoiling cartridges. Something that will stand up to the shear force.

My recommendation is to predrill then run a brass wood screw directly across the crack. If done right it will pull the sides together. Leave the head exposed, nip it off, then file flush. I learned this years ago from a guy who was an armorer in the late 40's. I've seen this repair on many stocks on surplus rifles. You can add some glue to the screw before you run it in for effect.

Glue is tricky to use on a crack like that. If I could, I would break it completely apart before gluing it back together. However I would not do that based on what I saw in your pictures.
 
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