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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am planning on buying a Rimington 700 xcr .308. My goal is to shoot a mile someday and i am having trouble deciding what scope to get that will allow me to learn to shoot that far and still be able to use it for closer shots. What do you guys think? let me know what kind of scope i might want to look into. thanks!
 

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Leupold 8x25 LRT........... or a Nightforce............ two of the best scopes for the money ;) Although shooting a mile accurately with a 308 is almost impossible. Need a 338 lapua or a 50 BMG. Something large and nasty!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
oh nice thanks buddy.
i was told by the gun dealer that this gun is one of the best long range rifles. he also told me that i could shoot a mile with the .308 version seeing as this is one of the most expensive rimington 700 i was thinking this could be true. the gun dealer was very experienced he seemed to know what he was talking about. so if this gun cant shoot a mile then i dont think i will be interested in getting it. are you positive it this gun wont be able to accomplish this task?
 

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Hello Sir, 308 is a good round but is loosing its ummpphh at 1000 yards and a mile is over 1700 yards. The 300 win mag is good to say 1500 yards........ if you really want to shoot a mile accurately with a well built and constructed rifle find something chambered in 338 Lapua Magnum. My good friend shoots long range extensivly. He has repeatedly shot prairie dogs at 2600 yards one shot one kill. The lapua will be the one you want if your wanting to reach out that far. Hope this helps ;)
 

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Budget...that's your first hurdle....How much you looking to spend total versus how much are you willing to spend.

Gun dealers....unless he's blood kin or a old time school buddy you can trust...you're best to do your own research (like you are doing now)...they are trying to make a sale and forgive me for making an SWAG assumption but just from your posts you read as someone who is pretty green in precision shooting...which there is nothing wrong with that.

I can't see how the XCR could be any better than a 700 5R Milspec.

Besides, if dead set on .308 at 1000+ yards...you'll want to shoot a minimum 175 gr. bullet. for consistant accuracy with a preferable twist rate of 1-10" which the Remmy don't use....."yet".....(just Google Remington 700 AAC Blackout http://www.snipershide.com/forum/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=1761159&page=1 )

Remington is big on the 1-12" twist and it will work to an extent.....However the Savage 10FP and 12FV uses barrels with 1-10" and I think would be better choices for the extreme range you are talking about. They are less expensive (def not using the word "cheaper" here) than the Remmy's which allows you to add the extra money you would spend on the 700 to go torwards your glass fund.

1 mile? What NS said.... .338 LM or .408 Cheytac

Leupold, Nightforce or Schmidt & Bender are great optics with my opinion the Nightforce being the best for the money spent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys, the info i got from the gun dealer seems to be just like you said "trying to make a sale" so this helps a lot.

as you can see im pretty new to sharp shooting so bare with me.

im looking to spend about $1200 on the rifle and about the same (if i need to) for the obtics. I guess a mile shot is farther away from me than i expected because im not looking to spend 5 dollars a bullet so maybe .338 and .408 is not an option for me right now.

If i wanted to shoot around 900 yards what rifle specificly do you recommend? Im thinking .308 is where i want to be. unless there is a reason why i shouldnt want that.

please let me know what you guys think.
 

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308 will do it but I would bump up to a 300 win mag. If your wanting precision shot after shot look into relaoding. You can get a good RCBS rock chucker press and accessories and turn out good match grade mmo that will be more precise than production line ammo. ;)
 

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I am with Noble, go with 300 win mag. I have Tikka varmint 308 and Savage 110 Fcpk in 300 win mag. Love them both, but 300 win mag more flatter then 308.
300 win mag 1.5" 300 yards with reloads
308 2-3"300 Yards with reloads

P.S. Leopold Mark 2 on Savage and Vari x on Tikka
 

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Purpose? Size of target? Punch hole in paper or slay animal of what size?
Other than long distance, you fail to adequately describe exactly what you intend to do with it and results you expect to get out of it and how often you intend to shoot it.
While .308 has long been a standard in bolt "sniper rifles", why then is the military rapidly converting to the much farther reaching .338 that carries much more kinetic energy at extreme distance?
If you are going to be any good at shooting at long range, you have to practice practice and practice some more as well as becoming very good at windage and elevation compensation which becomes more complicated the further you shoot. Therefore, costs of ammunition to afford the necessary practice bears consideration and factoring into your project. If you can't afford to shoot a sufficient quantity of ammo to get good with the rifle, your long range shooting skills, and become thoroughly familiar with the characteristics of the ammo, what is the point? Don't expect to pick up the rifle once or twice a year and hit pie plate a mile away no matter how good the rifle, ammunition, and scope are and no matter how much you spend on it. You simply won't do it and the more expensive the ammo, the less of it you will shoot. There is no magic rifle, scope, or bullet which will allow you to pick it up and hit something a mile away without the necessary skills to go with it!

While the Rem 700 has enjoyed a name brand recognition for many years, I have had experiences with them indicating they just don't stand up to heavy or sustained shooting, the kind of which is needed for much practice, and suffer from much malfunction when shot hot and dirty.

Glassware is for small objects at distances farther than can be seen with the naked eye. Extreme distances can require extreme magnification. The higher you go on the magnification scale, the fewer scopes you will find offered in such configuration. Higher magnification, at longer ranges also come with their own problems such as mirage, light reflection, fine increments of adjustment, parallax adjustment and optical clarity. Compare 40x to 12x and note these differences. When you compare the few scopes in the higher magnifications, choices come down to extremely expensive (as in far more expensive than the gun you are mounting it on) or cheaper scopes that may not have the necessary features or quality. You won't know until you spend the money to try it out, at the intended distance, and see if it holds up to the recoil of the ammo you are shooting. Note that when you get into the larger magnum calibers, the scope is far more prone to breaking or failing. Be sure to look for that "limited lifetime warranty" and if it covers repair or replacement when the scope inevitably fails.

Aside from glassware, note that mounting is critical. Only the highest quality rings, on the highest quality mount, most securely attached and battleship turret rugged will prevent things from rattling loose. Your ability to maintain a reliable zero depends more on the mounting than the scope itself. Do not settle for an expensive scope on a cheap mount under any circumstances.

There is much to learn and many considerations here before you break out the checkbook and don't be quick to fall for whatever line some dealer is feeding you.
His objective is to part you from your money and you may be very unhappy with the results.
Take some more time to heavily research the subject and educate yourself before flushing your money down the drain on a wasted project that will not satisfy.
 

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I would agree with db2044, spare the following remark;

While .308 has long been a standard in bolt "sniper rifles", why then is the military rapidly converting to the much farther reaching .338 that carries much more kinetic energy at extreme distance?
While the .338 is becoming much more common, I wouldn't say that the military is "converting" to it, over .308. In fact, if they're converting to anything, in what are commonly accepted as "sniper rifles", it's shorter barreled .308 bolt actions and/or semi autos, which are better suited to urban combat scenarios. There's no question that the .338 fills a niche that others cannot, however. It's more accurate than a .50 caliber (without the overkill on smaller soft targets, recoil and weight), but far exceeds the capabilities of the .30 cal.

You may be best served by going with a smaller, less expensive caliber/rifle/glass, to get started and learn the basics. You can get set up very well with a rifle and glass, for around $1500. Spend the rest on reloading supplies, but put your biggest investment into research and time behind the trigger. Then, you can decide when it's time to take the next step and in what direction you want that step to be.

John
 

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Actually they are in the process of slowly converting their sniper rifles chambered in 308 over to 300 wim mag although they are still buying some rifles chambered in 338 lapua. The 300 wim mag will be the norm form the military report I read...........
 

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To be OT, it should be mentioned. If you post how much you are willing to spend for a good long range scope it would help.
There are LOTS of options and prices range from a little to thousands of dollars for a good scope and mount.

If you are new to long range shooting. I would not spend a lot right off the bat.

There are lots of options and you can work up to better options.

You will have to learn, how to dope for wind, which is more of a talent than science.

You will need a spotter with a scope to call your shots.

.308 is a good starting point in a good model rifle. You can get them for under $1000 already scoped.
LOTS of practice will be needed depending on your particular talent.
Some folks are naturally gifted to shoot long range, as in any endevor.


If you plan to go out over 1,000 yds. reading wind will be paramount. Wind shears will be challenge for you.

Comment on the sniper rifle angle.

To say "THEY" "are converting to a certain cal." is a broad subject. Who is "they" There are many agencies, units, in the miliatary that have different requirements for long range work.

Look up what the issue Marine sniper rifles were. Short .308 M40 IIRC in use for years.
So what does the "converting to" mean?

THe military has many agencies and outfits that all use different tools for different jobs that need to be done. When it comes to rifles and types.

Every branch has its own preference. Not to mention small units within a branch of service.

It is missleading to say that the military is using one type or another. Some outfits use several different types, to fit the job that needs to be done.



There is no one cal. or type that will be used by ALL the different branches of the military. Contrary to what some "expert" gun rag writers write about.

Don't want people to get the impression the U.S. military will use one cal. or type of sniper rifle.

Some militaries around the world use .22 for sniper work, as well as 50 cal. and everthing in between.

The .308 has been a standard around the world. 7.62X51 NATO, for many years in sniper rifles. Probably the most common used. So far.

Every mfg. has tried to topple it from being the most used, by introducing the new and improved fan dangled round and or rifle. None have so far.
The round that the Swedes used for over 100 yrs. 6.5X55 or variations thereof, have been hyped as the new super duper sniper round in past years. Just one expample of the marketing hype.

Obviously .308 isn't the best long range round, all cal. have limitations. But overall it is the most used.

Just a note, since this has been talked about for years and is getting as old as the cal. wars.


If you want to shoot over 1,000 yds. use .338L or even .50 easy concept.
300 Win mags another option. No brainer.



Sniper Rifles Twilight 2000

Anyone contemplating shooting at long range and extreme long range will benefit from looking through and reading the write ups on what is REALLY being used for serious long range work. Check out the link.

The gun rag hype and B.S. is never ending with opinions etc. Most have an agenda, selling something, few have any real experience in long range shooting.

THis will give the reader a broader view of what is really being used.
It is for sure that if a better platform in the civilian market is found for long range work, the military special units will look into it and test it. Use it if they find it to be a better system.


See what is REALLY being used by world class snipers and long range shooters. This is just a small sampling.

There are many others. Like I said for certain scenerious .22s are used. That ought to frost somebody nuts.

FWIW. There are several milsurp rifles that shoot very well at 1,000 yds.

We use Finn M/N M39s at that range with the right milsurp ammo. Rifles with unissued barrels. Trigger are exc. OTB. Some scoped, some aren't.

Also 91/30s Finn capture with new TIkkA barrels.

These are chambered in 7.62.


Swede M41b, M96

Even some 8mm Mausers using M75 Yugo, or P coded German 8mm from the late 30s. A little "iffy" at times, but we do shoot them at that range.

The current modern 1,000 yd shooter some of our club members use. AR10T in .308 May be a passng fad.

Remington 700 is an old standard for 1,000 yds. .308
 

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Hi there,when you are looking for scope mounts you might consider using a one piece picatinney rail with 15 0r 20 MOA cant built in so that you will be more in the center of your scopes elevation adjustment range,otherwise you may run out of elevation at the longer ranges. Ken Farrell is one maker,no affiliation,have 2 of his mounts,they are bedable and well made.You can also use Burris Signature Zee rings with the offset inserts.Practice at shorter ranges until you are consistant and comfortable reading the conditions,have a friend spot for you if possible,it really helps to have another set of eyes at times.Go to your local range if one is convenient especially if they have long range varmint or benchrest shoots and ask questions and advice,most shooters are usually willing to share knowledge and may even let you shoot their rigs.Homework now means less pain to your wallet later.Regards, Jim
 
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