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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello all,
I'm way out of my element on this one.... I have this LC Smith 16GA double barrel, hammerless, with exceptional engraving. I've looked at the LC Collectors website and couldn't figure out which model and or grade it is. According to some of the data the serial number of 61,082, with this type of barrel markings should place it at 1902 or so.....
It has a number 2 stamped on the receiver under the left side lock.
It has some detractions such as the ejection lever engraving doesn't match up at the top of the receiver, there are some minor dents from a previous removal of the locks and the safety is questionable (I don't have snap caps for 16GA).



Any and all info you can provide would be a great help,
Thanks!
DB
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
...More photos...




Also, all numbers match wherever one is visible....

Any kind of valuation would be welcome as well...

Thanks again,
DB
 

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It's a Grade #2 what the collectors call a 'Fulton' (NY)mfg'r L. C. Smith.
There's a distinction betw pre1913 and post 1913 mfg L.C Smith shotguns

After 1913 they changed the Grades from simple Numbers to Names like Crown Grade, Olympic, ect.

I agree that it was made in 1902. It has the early style extractor mechanism engagement system (the small side cuts in the frame table)
The firing pin bushings were pre-1913 LC Smith . After 1913 they were no longer used and a simple firing pin hole in the breech face was used.

The Grade #2 was one Grade above the Field Grade which was called the 'O Grade' at the time.
If the gun was fitted with ejectors , an 'E' was added to the guns description.
A 'Grade 2' with ejectors became a Grade 2E.
A 'Grade O' became a Grade OE.

The brass 'keeper screws' in the firing pin bushings are original.
DO NOT dry fire any L C Smith.
One reason is especially for the pre-1913 guns,,the firing pin bushings are prone to cracking in dry firing.
The other is that if you dry fire ANY LC Smith with bbls off of the frame,,you cannot put the gun back together again UNLESS you recock the locks manually.

To do that, use a screwdriver shaft or a very small cresent wrench to engage the cocking arms at the front of the action.
Uncocked,,the arms(s) will be in the up position. You must cock them by moving them to the down position. That will cock the hammer(s) inside the lock(s)'
With a screwdriver shaft. leveraging against one cocking arm, press against the other and move it to the lower position untill it clicks and 'cocks'.
Then move over to the other and do the same thing.
Using a small cresent wrench simply clamp onto the arm and rotate it downward. till cocked.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you very much for that information! I got some info from the LC Smith collectors association, but you filled in a lot of gaps....
Thanks again,
DB
 
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