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Epoxy is best. Acraglas, regular or gel, is NOT designed as a glue but as a bedding compound. It stays slightly flexible and its contraction on setting is controlled so you can pry the receiver out.
 

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Epoxy is good, perhaps ,strongest. Use slow-set. But I really prefer an aliphatic wood glue for that sort of thing and have found it works very well indeed. Especially if couple of armorer's screws are used as well.
 

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For replacing chipped area on any non-stressed wood repair, the aliphatic wood glue or even Gorilla Glue will work better than epoxy. These glues can be stained & repairs are virtually invisible. I just completed a stock refinish on a trapdoor carbine where someone used tinted acraglas. While the repair is solid and sound, it won't ever match the surrounding wood, since it won't absorb stain.
 

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Epoxy is best. Acraglas, regular or gel, is NOT designed as a glue but as a bedding compound. It stays slightly flexible and its contraction on setting is controlled so you can pry the receiver out.
I disagree. Brownell's tells dealers to use AcraGlas and glue together 2 small pieces of wood end to end and have customers try to break the two pieces apart. It can't be done. AcraGlas is excellent epoxy and I've used it to bond hundreds of gun and non gun items. Gary
 

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AcraGlas is not 100% epoxy, containing other plastics for flexibility. Brownells is to be expected to try to increase sales and AcraGlas is certainly stronger than wood, if not quite as strong as most epoxies, but its also a lot more expensive than epoxy. The 59 ml size of AcraGlas is $24.99 (plus shipping). The same amount of Epoxy glue would be $10. But I usually just buy the smaller $5 tubes because they are plenty for my projects. Epoxy is perfect for gunsmithing since its resistant to oils and the usual cleaning chemicals. Other wood glues work fine in lightly stressed areas but Gorilla Glue, a urethane glue, expands on curing, can be messy, and has been known to come apart from reactions with some chemicals and other glues. The Doublegun BBS reported some shotgun stock repair failures with Gorilla Glue, and it and other urethanes are avoided by boatbuilders because they are incompatible with common polyester and epoxy resins.
 
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