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Discussion Starter #1
When I pull back on my 1911a1 Colt slide and release to to chamber a round or even on an empty chamber, the hammer follows the slide and travels forward. I am not able to fire the pistol due th the hammer being forward unless I manually **** it back. What is worn out or needs to be replaced to make it function as designed?
 

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May be a spring or sear issue. To eliminate an issue that may cause you to shake your head try working the slide with a gorilla grip on the grip itself to make sure the slide isn't bouncing everything hard enough to release the hammer. That would be extreme end of issues but I think spring is either too weak or sear is worn.
 

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rpf,

What is the condition of you pistol? I mean, is it in excellent shape or has it been shot a lot? I would replace the sear and related hammer/sear spring and then give it a go. The sear may be worn or the 3-finger spring under the backstrap may have a broken finger.

I hope this helps.

Webley
 

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Discussion Starter #4
rpf,

What is the condition of you pistol? I mean, is it in excellent shape or has it been shot a lot? I would replace the sear and related hammer/sear spring and then give it a go. The sear may be worn or the 3-finger spring under the backstrap may have a broken finger.

I hope this helps.

Webley
Thanks ! Pistol is in good condition. I will replace sear and pull grips to check hammer spring.
 

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Thanks ! Pistol is in good condition. I will replace sear and pull grips to check hammer spring.
rpf,

No, Not the hammer spring, you need to check the 3-finger sear spring. The hammer spring is inside the arched housing and does not seem to be a problem.

Webley
 

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Discussion Starter #6
rpf,

No, Not the hammer spring, you need to check the 3-finger sear spring. The hammer spring is inside the arched housing and does not seem to be a problem.

Webley
OK, I have the 3-finger spring out... looking for a pic of a new one to compare to.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
3 finger sear looks good. The grip safety looks damaged and worn in the dog leg area where it protrudes... ordered a replacement
 

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Hammer-follows-slide is probably the most common 1911 fault.

FIRST, try bending the left hand leg of the sear spring forward slightly to put more tension on the sear.
Often that's all that's needed.
With not enough tension on the sear the closing slide causes the trigger to bounce in the frame and the sear is pressed enough for the hammer to drop to half ****.

If that fails to correct it, you need to look at the sear and the hammer notches.
They could be worn or damaged.

If the hammer is falling all the way down, that's likely a hammer or sear problem.

Be aware: A hammer that drops all the way is in immediate danger of causing the gun to fire in a full-auto burst. DANGEROUS.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hammer-follows-slide is probably the most common 1911 fault.

FIRST, try bending the left hand leg of the sear spring forward slightly to put more tension on the sear.
Often that's all that's needed.
With not enough tension on the sear the closing slide causes the trigger to bounce in the frame and the sear is pressed enough for the hammer to drop to half ****.

If that fails to correct it, you need to look at the sear and the hammer notches.
They could be worn or damaged.

If the hammer is falling all the way down, that's likely a hammer or sear problem.

Be aware: A hammer that drops all the way is in immediate danger of causing the gun to fire in a full-auto burst. DANGEROUS.
Much appreciated!! I did order a factory Colt replacement sear as well. I will just replace it and see if the problem is solved. Thankfully and function tested it prior to live firing it.
 

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Hammer-follows-slide is probably the most common 1911 fault.

FIRST, try bending the left hand leg of the sear spring forward slightly to put more tension on the sear.
Often that's all that's needed.
With not enough tension on the sear the closing slide causes the trigger to bounce in the frame and the sear is pressed enough for the hammer to drop to half ****.


If that fails to correct it, you need to look at the sear and the hammer notches.
They could be worn or damaged.
If the hammer is falling all the way down, that's likely a hammer or sear problem.
Be aware: A hammer that drops all the way is in immediate danger of causing the gun to fire in a full-auto burst. DANGEROUS.
Mr. defariswheel, it's these threads that make this forum great. Thank you, sir. (I also see your incredibly knowledgeable contributions on the Colt forum. It's people like you that make these forums work!)
 

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Fine thread. Common problem at times with this model pistol. Often , a result of improving efforts on trigger pull. Now its tedious and time consuming to tear down and do one change at a time but its not cost effective to outright replace hammer, sear, and sear spring. In fact the issue could be 1, 2 or all 3 of those parts or just 1. We know at least 1. Thus, bite the bullet, only replace one part at a time and on this particular instance, bending sear spring first to determine if that solves the issue would be my first approach. If not...take a hard look at that sear and hammer. I recently bought Colt mfg sears for $15 at Brownells to solve this same problem on one of my 1911 that has tons of hard use. I did not have to replace the hammer so the entire drama ended up tweeking sear spring and replace sear. Months later another 1911 with 30 plus years of hard use started showing signs of hammer drop as well as trigger pull becoming mushy. On that pistol the rescue efforts entailed a new sear spring, a new disconnector and a new sear. Tear down, replace part, build back...repeat process as each new part put into the pistol and so forth. Parts do wear and being a heavy shooter of the 1911 , I do have some pistols with very high round counts...40K to 60K . Its not surprising at this point in time, some parts show signs of wear. So far, I've not had to replace a hammer but do have a spare in parts bin just incase. Its been my SOP to replace recoil springs every 2500 to 3000 rds along with firing pin spring. My frames and slides do not show signs of peening as I am very religious about replacing those two springs. That said, an extractor really gets a ton of abuse and its one part I always keep a few spares on hand. On one specific Series 70 Colt that has 52,280 rds fired thru it (yes, I keep round count), its on its 3rd extractor , so they don't crap out very often but they will ..so if one does, duly note there are Series 70 and Series 80 type extractors. Know which to order.

In todays world , I prefer the following after market parts: Colt or Wilson sears, Les Bauer disconnector, Colt / Wilson sear springs, Wolf recoil springs , Mec Gar brand magazines, EGW or Wilson extractors. Those perform always so I go to those makers.

Last note : trigger pull. I have a jig to do this and can correctly get a match grade pull but for most of my 1911's my trigger pulls are 4 to 4.5 #, achieved by tweeking sear spring, and polishing sear, disconnector, trigger bar, trigger bar channel in frame...polish not take any metal off. Lots of videos on trigger pulls so look at them all and get busy. Great improvements can be made on pulls w/o use of a jig and removal of metal.

That said: I have found no matter how great I get a trigger pull , the short trigger and long triggers commonly on 1911 or sold for them make the pulls feel awkward. The length of trigger makes a difference and its compounded by how fat your hand grips are / are not. Also by how large or small your hands and also..if you have a flat or arched main spring housing. Lots of geometry going on. So again, if you are not happy with your trigger pull, sometimes a simple change from flat to arched main spring housing puts your hand higher and your finger in a better position onto the trigger and problem is solved.

There are Medium Triggers, you just got to hunt for them but a few can be found. On one of my 1911 everything was great but with my short trigger finger I was not happy with the long trigger on it and totally not happy with a short trigger on it....I bought a medium trigger and BINGO.

The 1911 is like the AR 15: lots of parts out there to make it 'fit" your specific requirements.
 
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