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Interesting story and nice looking rifle! I've had dozens of Trapdoors over the years, but still have yet to get a carbine or a Bannerman. That one looks like it's a good mix of the two. I wouldn't mind getting one of those to just plink with.

I read somewhere that Bannerman bought a large quantity of unissued rifles as well as parts. At the time, carbines were more popular because they were easier to handle and carry. Bannerman saw an opportunity for greater profit, so he cut down rifles into carbine length. That way he was able to sell them for a few dollars more than the rifles.
 

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very nice rifle, although I don't believe it's "near unissued" looks to me like a put together on a repro stock with fake cartouches. the stock looks way, way too good compared with the metal parts

and yes, they make fake cartouches, here is a example of one there are more other different ones

https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/esa-civil-war-cartouche-stamp-die-458110316

still it's a nice rifle

I was hoping someone would introduce that possibility before I had to decide whether to do so. I am far from certain, but it is a strong possibility.h

Te environmental factors which produce that very modest amount of discolouring of the metal, aren't the same as would produce deterioration of the wood. It could have been on the wall in a small museum for many decades. But the pores of the wood are still open. It hasn't been much oiled, waxed. handled or rven n a smoke-filled room. I

know some repro stocks don't have nearly as good ft of metal to wood. But I think that comes from one-size-fits-all hand fitting after the stock comes from the duplicating machine. Fitting to this metalwork might do a much better job.

It's a beautiful example, and good value unless you paid highly for total originality. But I would call it extremely good restoration, by someone with the good taste not to get too clever with the metal.

I seem to remember some good writing on the Springfield by (unless I'm wrong) Ned Roberts. He described long-range shooting at a riverside bluff face as the light faded, with the old Gould bullet, with a black powder blank inserted in the hollow nose, and locating the hits by the flash.
 

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"JQMD", the OP, is clearly experienced with "Trap-Door" Springfield rifles and has disassembled this recent acquisition.

He says, having seen the stock's interior (barrel channel and lock recess), "all the markers are there" to confirm it is an original.

I believe him.

(I can recall a time, when such well preserved specimens of model 1866 Springfield rifles appeared at gun shows).

BTW - Bannerman, and others, sold a lot of original U.S. and foreign military stuff "as issued". Not everything was messed with or parts cobbled together.

"JQMD", thanks for sharing photos of your truly nice Model 1866 Springfield!
 

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In my opinion you have a really nice rifle that although is not so nearly unissued it looks to be all original. I see wear on the stock that is consistent with the metal. The edges of the flat panel opposite the lock are a little dull/ worn and "match" the fading of the blue on the breech bolt and the case hardening colors on the lock. The lock panel edges are a little more sharp, which I've seen on CW muskets, as the lock bolt side is the side that wears against ones body when carried on parade or in the field.

As others noted there are mint condition M1866 rifles out there. Here is one that I "found" on Gunbroker around 2 years ago. It looks like it was made yesterday but like the OP's rifle, mine has rust marks near the muzzle. One of these days I will try to remove it by scrubbing with a copper dishwashing pad dipped in oil. Since copper is softer than steel it shouldn't scratch the barrel and the edges of the copper mesh should be able to scrape off the rust. I will test it first on the underside of the barrel just to make sure.
 

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Lightly rub the edge of a pure copper penny with some oil over the rust spot. Should take most if not all the rust off with no blemish.
 

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Lightly rub the edge of a pure copper penny with some oil over the rust spot. Should take most if not all the rust off with no blemish.
I would suggest leaving well enough alone. If the discoloration/blemish on Steve’s barrel doesn’t easily wipe away with a bit of oil and a soft, non abrasive cloth it makes no sense to resort to more aggressive techniques. The dark brown areas are clearly not recent or active spots of corrosion. It’s an age appropriate patina that is far more pleasing to the eye than the shiny areas that will result when the metal is scrubbed clean.

There may indeed be real craftsmen who have the talent and experience to properly (and nondestructively) “clean” artifacts and collectibles but those artisans are few and far between. The vast majority of cleaning and “restoration” efforts are performed by individuals who bring good intentions to the table but are lacking in skill and judgment. It’s important to know when to stop. It’s even more important to know when not to even begin. The end result is all too often the replacement of an old eyesore with one newly created.

The effects of time cannot be erased. Nor should they be. It’s important to be cognizant of what can and cannot be done keeping in mind at all times what should be any serious collectors guiding principles: Respect and appreciate the past. Accept reality. And do no harm.
 

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#28 - can't enlarge photo 2, but the eagle on the l/hand side of the receiver doesn't appear to be there or is v. faint. Still put's mine to shame:(.
 

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Hi Staffy, the eagle is there on the flat and it's very crisp, but just not visible in the photo. Also, on the top flat the "5" from 1865 is still there. The other numbers were cut out when the breech was modified for the trapdoor block.

Good advice from members about the rust spots and patina. If not simply removed with a copper penny or scouring pad it will stay there for its next custodian. I have no intention of buffing the metal.
 
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