Gunboards Forums banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Greetings everyone,

I just wanted to share this awesome Springfield Trapdoor rifle I recently picked up at an auction. It appears to be nearly unissued. The cartouches are sharpest I've ever seen, the bore is perfect, and the lock is as crisp as the day it was made. There are even remnants of the case colors on the lock. The wood is almost perfect as well. It's a great shooter too! The only downside is that there's some spots of rust on top of the barrel. Is there any way of removing these spots of rust without using any kind of abrasive? Anyway, I just thought you guys would appreciate seeing this!
 

Attachments

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
10,371 Posts
Beautiful! Love the sharp edges on the stock! :thumbsup:
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
10,371 Posts
JQMD:

I forgot to mention, welcome to Gun Boards! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,937 Posts
Nice piece! It is amazing how many of this model Springfield Survived in this condition. Especially when most were sold to France. I have two similar rifles. One with the oil finish stock and the other with the experimental varnished stock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,701 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
FWIW - The stock looks original to me and consistent with condition of metal.

Careful disassembly and viewing of quality of interior inletting for lock and action, should allow confirmation of originality.

IIRC - Since the Model 1866 Springfield was a conversion of the 1863 Springfield muzzle-loader, the stock will be inletted for a ramrod-spring, but, the spring will be absent.

The 1866 cleaning/clearing rod is shorter than the 1865 ramrod and screws into a plate above front of trigger guard.

The stock will have "new" inletting for clearance for the "horse shoe" shaped spring, that performs as the ejector.

P.S. - If you don't have it, get Richard Hosmer's great and inexpensive book on the .50 & .58 caliber 'Trap-Doors'.

(BTW - Put the lock on 'half-****' and lightly tap the loosened 'lock-screws' to start lock removal. This clears the main-spring from contact with the wood and avoids chipping the Stock around the lock-mortise).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,386 Posts
Small spots of rust can be removed without marking blue or metal by use of small diameter ,very hard ,steel or carbide rod .......must be highly polished and perfectly smooth.The smooth hard rod crushes the rust ,and it can be wiped off with a bit of kerosene on a rag.......keep the surface perfectly clean ,and no scratches will result.......Suggest you get a bit of practice on a test piece first ,to gauge the force ,etc needed to remove rust while leaving blue mingled with the rust behind......The pitting caused by the rust isnt removed ,and will stay ......It could be converted to black colour by boiling in dist water ,as with rust blue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
very nice rifle, although I don't believe it's "near unissued" looks to me like a put together on a repro stock with fake cartouches. the stock looks way, way too good compared with the metal parts

and yes, they make fake cartouches, here is a example of one there are more other different ones

https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/esa-civil-war-cartouche-stamp-die-458110316

still it's a nice rifle

Thanks for the reply, but I am positive the stock is original.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
FWIW - The stock looks original to me and consistent with condition of metal.

Careful disassembly and viewing of quality of interior inletting for lock and action, should allow confirmation of originality.

IIRC - Since the Model 1866 Springfield was a conversion of the 1863 Springfield muzzle-loader, the stock will be inletted for a ramrod-spring, but, the spring will be absent.

The 1866 cleaning/clearing rod is shorter than the 1865 ramrod and screws into a plate above front of trigger guard.

The stock will have "new" inletting for clearance for the "horse shoe" shaped spring, that performs as the ejector.

P.S. - If you don't have it, get Richard Hosmer's great and inexpensive book on the .50 & .58 caliber 'Trap-Doors'.

(BTW - Put the lock on 'half-****' and lightly tap the loosened 'lock-screws' to start lock removal. This clears the main-spring from contact with the wood and avoids chipping the Stock around the lock-mortise).

Thank you butlersrangers! I've collected Trapdoors for nearly 20 years, so the first thing I did when I got it was take it apart. All the markers were there to confirm that the stock was original. I've seen 66s sitting in repro stocks, and the fit of metal to stock is never quite right.

That is a great book! I had a copy of it, but it has gotten lost in the last move. I need to pick up another copy.

Thanks again for the reply!
 

·
Platinum Bullet member
Joined
·
20,127 Posts
Back in the early 60's a buddy's Dad got an unissued trapdoor with matching bayonet really cheap. Seems that unissued surplus rifles were a dime a dozen back then. When I first saw it, he had it all disassembled in his shop and was removing partially varnished cosmoline from it. It was a real showpiece. At the time we were in Boy Scouts and our Troop was working on our Marksmanship Meritbadges at a Rocketdyne employee range. One weekend he brought the trapdoor out to the range, along with a crate of ammo with copper cases. We all had a chance to fire it. It was great fun. After my buddy's Dad passed, nothing was ever mentioned about the whereabouts of the rifle. They were common in perfect condition back then. I don;t think he paid more than around $60 for it.
I have a Bannerman cut-down rifle that looks to have been assembled from parts & all metal has been blued. I bought it from an estate sale & the seller thought it was an Italian repro. The serial # indicates it was made in 1874. Unlike your rifle, mine's nothing special, but was assembled by Bannerman for sale likely as a cheap farm gun.
1873 Springfield.jpg
 

·
Silver Bullet member
Joined
·
48,498 Posts
Drops of kerosene will soak throughout the encrusted ..
then removal will leave bluing under rust that’s still intact safe!
methods to look up would be museums care of such..
a fine example... every one would feel special owning it..
welcome to boards..be blessed.<>< dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Back in the early 60's a buddy's Dad got an unissued trapdoor with matching bayonet really cheap. Seems that unissued surplus rifles were a dime a dozen back then. When I first saw it, he had it all disassembled in his shop and was removing partially varnished cosmoline from it. It was a real showpiece. At the time we were in Boy Scouts and our Troop was working on our Marksmanship Meritbadges at a Rocketdyne employee range. One weekend he brought the trapdoor out to the range, along with a crate of ammo with copper cases. We all had a chance to fire it. It was great fun. After my buddy's Dad passed, nothing was ever mentioned about the whereabouts of the rifle. They were common in perfect condition back then. I don;t think he paid more than around $60 for it.
I have a Bannerman cut-down rifle that looks to have been assembled from parts & all metal has been blued. I bought it from an estate sale & the seller thought it was an Italian repro. The serial # indicates it was made in 1874. Unlike your rifle, mine's nothing special, but was assembled by Bannerman for sale likely as a cheap farm gun.
View attachment 3704195
Interesting story and nice looking rifle! I've had dozens of Trapdoors over the years, but still have yet to get a carbine or a Bannerman. That one looks like it's a good mix of the two. I wouldn't mind getting one of those to just plink with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Drops of kerosene will soak throughout the encrusted ..
then removal will leave bluing under rust that’s still intact safe!
methods to look up would be museums care of such..
a fine example... every one would feel special owning it..
welcome to boards..be blessed.<>< dan
Thank you for the tips and the warm welcome!
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top