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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
After a few days of searching for examples of M1 Carbines in original as-issued condition, and coming up with very few verifiable examples, I decided to change the title of this thread so that other folks might have better luck in their searches.

They do exist, but mostly on the endangered species list. :)

All correct National Postal Meter Carbine as built in 1943 - enjoy the pics, and thanks for looking.




































 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Mike,

I haven't stripped it all the way down, but I have little doubt that this is an as issued or even unissued gun. Every part I checked is correct for a 1943 NPM. I bought it from a retired nurse, whose father passed away last year. She said, "My daddy came home (Korea) and this hung on the wall ever since."

The bore is perfect. The inside is full of dried oil/grease. Feedramp has all the milling marks. The mag was in original grease in a toolbox drawer (rusted anyway). The only wear is a light scratch from the charging handle stop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you, Tuna. Your well experienced input on the subject of carbines is always appreciated.

As I've followed many topics on the M1 over the years, I can convey that it is uncommon to find a specimen in its WWII configuration, and a good portion of those which exhibit original features have been "corrected" with a part or two swapped out. I don't believe that my carbine above is a corrected version.

My questions, to those who follow this subject more closely than I, would be how often do these war-time carbines appear in apparent unused condition? And, of course, what general range of value do they hold? TIA
 

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I have a Saginaw S'G' 1,183xxx in the same condition as yours and several offers were made at the SOS last weekend between $3400.00-$3800.00. However I didn't want to sell at any price. These type are as you know rare.
 

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6.2 million carbines made and if only 2% were brought back and put away then that is about 124,000 carbines of all makes combined. Not a lot of them around unmolested by a rebuild or by Bubba. Value of USGI carbines has been climbing and for one like yours even faster. Depending on what part of the country it's in the value would be in the $2500 to $4000 range. A real good cleaning of the stock with soap and water will help it. Better if something like Formby's furniture stripper/cleaner is used. Just a little at a time will clean over 70 years of oil and dirt from the stock. Do not sand it at all. Then a little bit of RAW linseed oil rubbed in by hand or flax seed oil if you can't find linseed. You have a nice gem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the accolades, folks.

And thanks again for your input, Tuna. I am fortunate to have one of the two-percenters.

But it was unfortunate that the seller had a local gunsmith "help" her with the sale preparation. He was supposed to clean it up, but from the fresh drying agent smell, I'm sure that he added a bath of BLO. As it didn't seem quite cured, I did take some soap and water on a damp sponge to the wood after taking pics, and it did dull the new shine and diminish the smell a little. I'll let it air for a few days, and gently go again. But truthfully, it ain't all that bad - mostly light hand oil staining. I may just call it good after another light wash.


I have a Saginaw S'G' 1,183xxx in the same condition as yours and several offers were made at the SOS last weekend between $3400.00-$3800.00. However I didn't want to sell at any price. These type are as you know rare.
Don't blame you one bit for keeping it! I feel the same way about the NPM and my other original build late Winchester.

Here are a few pics of my other beauty. All Winchester parts. This purchased directly from the 97 year old Navy Veteran, who traded his "long Japanese rifle" with another Vet on the return train trip from San Diego in late 1945.







 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I was very fortunate to have started rescue operations on the stock before the BLO took a deep set. After several hand rubs with water, the oil with the drying agents and a few decades of dust raised away, rolled up into little balls, and whisked away.

After drying, a couple applications of raw linseed oil worked into the wood and really enhanced the grain.

There was some absolutely gorgeous color under the gloss, too.




















 

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Beautiful Rifle....I just picked up 8 carbines.....5 of which have all early parts...high wood...push button safety etc.....will check on them when I get home in afew weeks.....(cant wait... got them day before I went on this trip)

Anyway my question is.... are you just using water on the stocks....(warm/cold?)....I have used Murphys oil soap added to warm water to clean (with a tooth brush)....wood pistol grips then applied a little boiled linseed on them after they were dry.....they come out great.....depending on how dirty they are may take afew bowls of the mixture to get them clean
Thanks Al
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
On the day I brought it home, I used a weak solution of liquid hand soap and warm water, lightly scrubbing with a sponge. The water turned greyish-brown.

The follow up was just warm water and hand rubbing. When the BLO finally released, I could feel the substance rolling up into little balls under my hand. I rubbed until no more contaminants came loose.

Raw linseed oil is a far better application than oils with a drying agent (BLO, Tung, etc.). The oils soak into the wood and enhance the grain, rather than drying in a glossy film on top of the wood.

The before and after difference for my example is stark, IMO. Even the cartouches came out with much greater definition. Now the gun looks like it should.



 

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If you find that there is still dark areas in the wood then try the Formby's to deep clean the wood. It won't hurt the stock at all and you will be surprised how much more old oil and dirt it will get out. Now Al, tell me just where in the small state of Corruption you found 8 carbines at the same time???? Seems I moved last year too soon.lol
 
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