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Copper Bullet member
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http://www.dw.de/national-german-gun-registry-on-target-for-launch/a-16390894

The German interior minister has said a countrywide database of all legal gun owners is set for launch on January 1. Hans-Peter Friedrich predicted a "considerable increase in security" as a result.

The German government plans to launch its complete registry of legal gun owners at the beginning of next year, two years ahead of a deadline set by the EU.

As with many German authorities, those responsible for weapons licensing and tracking operated on a local basis - with a total of 551 authorities around the country. Under new EU laws, all member countries are obliged to compile a centralized register.

There are an estimated 6 million licensed firearms in Germany.

Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich told reporters in Berlin that the database would provide "a very concrete contribution towards improving public safety." Thanks to the information, he said; police would be able to check "who owns which weapons legally, across the entire country," perhaps more quickly than in the past. ...

*EU laws ... embedded in UN gun ban treaty?
Not that you are not already on numerous lists as a gun owner, is this an ominous sign of what will be coming? After all, if it's good enough for the EU, a national gun registry is certainly a great idea here!
 

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Gold bullet with Oak Clusters member
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Pfffft! that is'nt going to work any better than the EU it'self. Seems that was tried back in 1938.
 

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Silver Bullet member
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as technologies become more advanced it compiled data happens any way......but humans have developed a non follow through attitude, paper work transferred to meetings, to data discussed is so over whelming as to cause things to fall, fail, unravel, unworkable, unreliable Enron failures, overreaching concepts, failed attempts to prove, provide, promote process.....prevent actions or put into place actions based on a moment in time.....enforced rightly, wrongly eternally historically...

so.....guard against the moment it all changes......is factually humanly inpossible....but on the other hand humanly responsible for all of us to react to when it happens!
 

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Banned
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I wonder, is it still only 'good Germans' who are allowed to own firearms? Well in my opinion it is the duty of all good Germans to make this registry as expensive, cumbersome and useless as possible.
 

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"a very concrete contribution towards improving public safety."

Improving public safety indeed. It will surely make the criminal element in that country sleep better at night knowing their illegally owned guns are not on the list and won't be confiscated.
 

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Silver Bullet member
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Pfffft! that is'nt going to work any better than the EU it'self. Seems that was tried back in 1938.
Actually the popular belief about Hitlers gun control act of 38 is shallow. There are plenty of things to despise Hitler for, but gun control isnt on the list. that is despite the best efforts of a blowhard group who made bumper stickers that read 'all in favor of gun control raise your right hand', complete with a picture of hitler saluting. Perhaps it would have been more accurate if it had a picture, well nevermind.

Though it was a registry it was more of a relaxation of laws for German citizens firearm ownership than the actual gun control imposed on them by the US and allies after the Great War, and the puppet Wiemar Republic. In fact before You could be executed for firearm possession before the 'registry' you speak of. Funny how the facts are always bent. Of course it wasn't a good thing if you were Jewish. But Germany at this point didn't consider Jews to be citizens of the country. Of course that was their right even if it is unpopular with us today. No uproar about China for Chineese, or Japan for Japaneese.

Restrictions imposed by the treaty of Versailles


In 1919 and 1920, to stabilize the country and in part to comply with the Treaty of Versailles, the German Weimar government passed very strict gun ownership restrictions. Article 169 of the Treaty of Versailles stated, "Within two months from the coming into force of the present Treaty, German arms, munitions, and war material, including anti-aircraft material, existing in Germany in excess of the quantities allowed, must be surrendered to the Governments of the Principal Allied and Associated Powers to be destroyed or rendered useless."[1]


In 1919, the German government passed the Regulations on Weapons Ownership, which declared that "all firearms, as well as all kinds of firearms ammunition, are to be surrendered immediately."[2] Under the regulations, anyone found in possession of a firearm or ammunition was subject to five years' imprisonment and a fine of 100,000 marks.


On August 7, 1920, the German government enacted a second gun-regulation law called the Law on the Disarmament of the People. It put into effect the provisions of the Versailles Treaty in regard to the limit on military-type weapons.


In 1928, the German government enacted the Law on Firearms and Ammunition. This law relaxed gun restrictions and put into effect a strict firearm licensing scheme. Under this scheme, Germans could possess firearms, but they were required to have separate permits to do the following: own or sell firearms, carry firearms (including handguns), manufacture firearms, and professionally deal in firearms and ammunition. This law explicitly revoked the 1919 Regulations on Weapons Ownership, which had banned all firearms possession.


Stephen Halbrook writes about the German gun restriction laws in the 1919-1928 period, "Within a decade, Germany had gone from a brutal firearms seizure policy which, in times of unrest, entailed selective yet immediate execution for mere possession of a firearm, to a modern, comprehensive gun control law."[3]


The 1938 German Weapons Act


The 1938 German Weapons Act, the precursor of the current weapons law, superseded the 1928 law. As under the 1928 law, citizens were required to have a permit to carry a firearm and a separate permit to acquire a firearm. Furthermore, the law restricted ownership of firearms to "...persons whose trustworthiness is not in question and who can show a need for a (gun) permit." Under the new law:


Gun restriction laws applied only to handguns, not to long guns or ammunition. Writes Prof. Bernard Harcourt of the University of Chicago, "The 1938 revisions completely deregulated the acquisition and transfer of rifles and shotguns, as well as ammunition."[4]
The groups of people who were exempt from the acquisition permit requirement expanded. Holders of annual hunting permits, government workers, and NSDAP party members were no longer subject to gun ownership restrictions. Prior to the 1938 law, only officials of the central government, the states, and employees of the German Reichsbahn Railways were exempted.[5]
The age at which persons could own guns was lowered from 20 to 18.[5]
The firearms carry permit was valid for three years instead of one year.[5]
Jews were forbidden from the manufacturing or ownership of firearms and ammunition.[6]
Under both the 1928 and 1938 acts, gun manufacturers and dealers were required to maintain records with information about who purchased guns and the guns' serial numbers. These records were to be delivered to a police authority for inspection at the end of each year.
 
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