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Discussion Starter #1
My father and I both own type 14 nambu's. His is early version and mine is a late version. We both have issues with the the gun cycling through the ammo when shooting. Has anyone heard of these having issues in this regard? Have a hard time believing it's just us, although with our luck you never know....thanks for the knowledge.....Joe
 

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There have been a few threads on this issue, try a search. That said it is usually the ammo(underpowered) or the springs need replacement.

A little more info on how your pistol doesn't cycle would help.
 

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I had this trouble with a mid-war Type 14 in excellent mechanical condition. I had started out with Wolff replacement recoil springs. I discovered that the 14 is very sensitive to weakened magazine springs. You can replace the mag springs, but what I did was to rely on another mag with noticeably stiffer spring. Also, you should be prepared to work up a load for your Nambu. It's expensive to do, but getting the right amount of recoil energy is important. The Nambu seems to have a narrow window of recoil energy tolerance. I'll look up a bit of load data for you in a sec, but bear in mind that it will not be official and loads for the Nambu should be worked up to with care and the guns should not be hot-rodded.

Okay. This from Midway Arms, Inc:

Bullet diameter: .320
Weight listed: 102gr (I prefer them closer to 90gr personally)
OAL: 1.220"

231, start 4.0gr, max 4.8
Bullseye, start 3.0gr, max 4.1
Unique, start 4.0gr, max 4.7

Nominal velocity: 1050fps

You may need to work up new loads for different bullets, depending upon the quantity and source reliability of your bullets. It's tricky business hand loading for these guns, even after all these years -- and it's really gotten much easier.

Good luck!

PS -- In case you haven't already figured this out, you can save a lot of wear and tear on your thumbs by fully depressing the later style Type 14 follower all the way down until it catches in the mag retention cutout. Then load the mag, taking care to get the ctgs in the correct alignment. Put tension back on the follower button and press the hooked edge of it back out of the mag retention cutout, and you're done. You can just pop it out with a ctg nose or pencil shaft, but I prefer not to stress the mag lips by slamming it internally with a sudden release.
 

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If you were shooting PCI ammunition, sold originally by Graf's, failure to eject and stovepiping is almost a certainty.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The ammo is H.D.8. 8mm Nambu. At least that is what is on the brass. Picked it up at a gun show locally....maybe that's the problem.
 

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I must be lucky. I don't shoot my Japanese pistols very often but have never had a problem with them. I've shot my 4.6 date Tokyo, my 14.9 date, an early T-94 and my Papa. All worked fine with Midway and Langley ammunition.
 

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The ammo is H.D.8. 8mm Nambu. At least that is what is on the brass. Picked it up at a gun show locally....maybe that's the problem.
A lot, maybe most, HD was sold as brass; you problem is likely related to reloaded ammo, IMO. Either way, change up the springs and get some different ammo.
 
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